the UC History Digital Archives

the UC History Digital Archives

Search the Los Angeles collection
Home > General History > The Ten Campuses > Los Angeles >

Departments


About UC Los Angeles
:: Historical Overview
:: Administrative Officers

Academic Units
:: Colleges and Schools
:: Academic Departments
:: Graduate Division
:: Institutes and Research Centers
:: Summer Sessions

Student Life
:: Student Housing
:: Student Government
:: Student Publications
:: Student Services
:: Traditions

Libraries and the Arts
:: Cultural Programs
:: Libraries

Additional Resources
:: Related Links
:: Bibliography

:: Sources

print-friendly format

Los Angeles: Departments


A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 

Scandinavian
Slavic Languages
Social Welfare
Sociology
Southeast Asian Studies
Spanish and Portugese
Speech
Statistics
Surgery

Scandinavian
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Slavic Languages
The study of Slavic languages at the Los Angeles campus began in 1948, with the appointment of two instructors for elementary courses in Russian. In 1949, a Department of Slavic Languages formed (with Dean Franklin P. Rolfe as acting chairman); four instructors were appointed, upper division courses were introduced in Russian language and literature, and a Russian major was established. The years 1950-57 saw a modest expansion. A four-year sequence of Russian language courses was complemented by six courses in Russian literature. The student enrollment (130) remained approximately constant, as did the size of the teaching staff.

In the late 1950s, the character of the department began to change rapidly. By 1958, student enrollment had increased over 200 per cent and the number of majors had more than doubled. The necessity of planning a graduate program in Slavic became apparent. Graduate courses were first offered in the department in 1959; new staff members were recruited for this purpose, and the number of instructors in the department increased twofold. Courses in the Polish language were initiated in 1959; Serbo-Croatian was first taught in 1961. The first master's degrees in Slavic were granted in 1961.

The 1960s saw a continuation of the trend begun in the late 1950s. The graduate course offerings were strengthened considerably. By 1965, some 30 graduate students were enrolled in the department, four of whom advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. degree; 24 master's degrees have been granted. The largest enrollment continued to be found in first-year Russian and in the service courses (Russian literature in translation). An important addition to departmental facilities was the acquisition in 1964 of a language laboratory serving students in Russian, Polish, and Serbo-Croatian language courses.

The above summary showed the degree to which the department changed between 1948 and the mid-1960s. Although language teaching was still a central activity, the department also developed into an important center for advanced research in Slavic languages and literatures. The enormous growth of library holdings in the Slavic field was essential to this new function. The association of staff members with the Slavic Institute and with its successor, the Center for Russian and East European Studies also contributed greatly to the stimulation of research activities. source

to top

Social Welfare
See Colleges and Schools, School of Social Welfare.

Sociology
Sociology and anthropology were formally organized and combined to form a new department on July 1, 1940. The joint staff consisted of three members previously associated with the Departments of Economics and Psychology. Ten upper division courses were added in 1941-42; graduate research courses were added in 1944-45, and a Ph.D. program was introduced in 1947-48.

The companion departments cooperated in research, and also in building courses of aid to other departments. Some instruction interlocked with work in the Schools of Nursing and Social Welfare, the Departments of Linguistics and Folklore, and Latin American and other centers for area studies. Through joint appointments and professional collaboration, starting in the 1950s, the sociologists worked closely with the Departments of Education, Psychology, Anatomy and Psychiatry; the Schools of Business Administration and Public Health; and the Institute of Industrial Relations.

During the first fifteen years of the department, staff recruitment was focused on broad rather than narrow training and interests. Between 1940 and 1960, the joint faculty grew from three assistant professors to six instructors, ten assistant professors, seven associate professors and nine professors.

Undergraduate sociology majors numbered 250 by fall, 1948; 300 by fall, 1963; and 413 by spring, 1965. From 1948 to 1964, the graduate student body grew from four to 123; 16 master's degrees and 27 doctoral degrees were granted.

The joint department achieved many of its aims, but it was increasingly distracted by administrative problems arising from its growth, the needs of students, and the multiplying interests and activities of its faculty. After long study, the combined faculty voted to form separate departments, effective July 1, 1963.

By 1964, undergraduate courses in sociology had reached 40; graduate courses, 29; and the full-time faculty, 18. The undergraduate curriculum was broadened, training in research methods increased, and new laboratory equipment acquired. Also in 1963, the National Institute of General Medical Sciences furthered departmental aims by giving it a grant to develop a general research training program. Annually, 15 outstanding students were selected for this instruction. In 1962, the department initiated an honors class in sociology for freshmen with a grade point average of 3.5 or more, from any department. Students were eager to enter, and faculty were eager to teach this class. The department also cooperated with other disciplines to set up a Survey Research Center. source

to top

Southeast Asian Studies
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Spanish and Portuguese
Classes in Spanish were first offered at the Los Angeles State Normal School in 1917. For the first five years after the school became the Southern Branch of the University, both Spanish and French were taught by the Department of Romanic Languages. In 1924, the two language departments were separated, and Leonard D. Bailiff became chairman of the Department of Spanish. He held this position until 1942 when a combined Department of Spanish and Italian was established under the chairmanship of Marion A. Zeitlin, with courses offered in these two languages and their respective literatures and also in Portuguese, which had been taught in the department since 1938. Seven years later, the department was divided and the Spanish department, with John A. Crow as chairman, was officially designated the Department of Spanish and Portuguese.

When the first Bachelor of Arts degrees were awarded by the Southern Branch in 1925, eight students received the degree with a major in Spanish. Graduate courses were instituted in 1934, and three Master of Arts degrees in Spanish were granted in June of 1935. The first doctoral degree in romance languages and literatures with a specialization In Spanish was awarded in 1950, and five years later the first doctoral degree in the field of Hispanic languages and literatures was granted. In the year 1964, 40 students received the A.B. degree in Spanish, 12 received the M.A. degree and six the Ph.D. in Hispanic languages and literatures.

In 1965, the department, under the chairmanship of José R. Barcia, had a staff of 26 members and offered some 80 courses in Spanish and 12 in Portuguese, ranging in both instances from elementary language instruction through graduate seminars in literature and linguistics. Total enrollment in Spanish courses was 2,300, including 313 undergraduates majoring in Spanish.

The Spanish and Portuguese language laboratory, incorporating the latest in electronic equipment for the teaching of foreign languages, was opened in 1964. Plans for further expansion of departmental offerings included the establishment of instruction in methodology for teachers at the elementary school level, a major program in Portuguese, and undergraduate courses in Hispanic folklore. source

to top

Speech
The Department of Speech was established in July, 1963 after a long period of development within the Department of English. In the early years of the 1930s the Division of Public Speaking included courses in play production, oral interpretation of literature, phonetics, and public speaking. Most of the courses were lower division service offerings and were taught by junior staff members.

Following the establishment of the Department of Theater Arts in 1947, the Department of English established a major in speech, with emphasis on public address and oral interpretation. There was increased emphasis on theory, particularly in upper division courses. The courses at this level were concerned with understanding theories and principles of oral communications; with the phonetic, linguistic, and physiological aspects of oral language; with the history and criticism of public address in the ancient world, Great Britain, and the United States; and with the understanding and critical analysis of literature as an oral art.

In 1949, four graduate courses were added to the curriculum and students were prepared for the secondary teaching credential. Four years later the addition of four more graduate courses made possible the awarding of the M.A. degree. In 1958, the addition of still more courses on both the graduate and upper division levels made possible the program for the Ph.D. degree, which was first granted in 1963.

From 1948 to 1964, students could emphasize work in public address, oral interpretation, or speech correction. In 1964, the program in speech correction was discontinued, but in cooperation with the Department of English, a program of study in experimental phonetics was added in its stead. source

to top

Statistics
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Surgery
The Department of Surgery was proposed in the original plans for the School of Medicine by Dean Stafford L. Warren. The first appointments in the department were made May 21, 1948 and consisted of three assistant clinical professors and two associate clinical professors. Of this original group, Drs. Ernest Bors, C. Arnold Stevens, and Joseph Weinberg continued to participate in the affairs of the department in the mid-1960s.

The first full-time appointment in the department was that of the chairman, William P. Longmire, Jr., on October 1, 1948. The first budget awarded to the department was for the fiscal year 1949-50. Dr. William H. Muller, Jr., joined the full-time faculty as assistant professor of surgery, and Dr. John M. Beal came as instructor in surgery on July 1, 1949.

During this period, before the admission of medical students, the faculty time was largely spent with building plans, curriculum discussions, and the recruitment of additional personnel. Effort was also devoted to developing the teaching and training services in affiliated hospitals.

From the time the medical school opened in 1951 until the University of California Hospital, Los Angeles, was opened in 1955, clinical surgery was taught at the Wadsworth Veterans Administration Hospital. Since the completion of the new Los Angeles County Harbor General Hospital in February, 1963, this institution was made an integral part of the clinical teaching program in surgery. The department utilized all three hospitals in its teaching and training programs.

Until 1950 there were no research grants in the department. Over the years they increased steadily. During 1964-65, there were 112 grants, totaling $2,699,053 awarded to support the research and training activities in the Department of Surgery.

The size of each medical school class steadily increased from the 28 students admitted to the first class in 1951 to the 72 students admitted in 1963. During the first year the hospital was opened (1955-56), there were seven interns and 14 residents registered. There were no residents registered from affiliated institutions. During 1964-65, there were ten interns, 55 residents, and 71 affiliated residents registered in the department.

Surgical procedures continued to increase in complexity and specialization tended to become greater. The combined skills and efforts of a number of disciplines were required to diagnose and successfully manage a patient during the course of many operative procedures. A medical student's experience with the surgical patient provided a unique opportunity for the student to study firsthand alterations of physiological processes by disease, further alterations occasioned by operation, and the return to normal upon removal or relief of the pathological condition. These experiences formed the basic framework upon which the teaching program of the Department of Surgery was founded. source

to top


A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 

 
 
the UC History Digital Archives

Copyright © 1999-2005
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
Last updated 06/18/04.