the UC History Digital Archives

the UC History Digital Archives

Search the Los Angeles collection
Home > General History > The Ten Campuses > Los Angeles >

Departments


About UC Los Angeles
:: Historical Overview
:: Administrative Officers

Academic Units
:: Colleges and Schools
:: Academic Departments
:: Graduate Division
:: Institutes and Research Centers
:: Summer Sessions

Student Life
:: Student Housing
:: Student Government
:: Student Publications
:: Student Services
:: Traditions

Libraries and the Arts
:: Cultural Programs
:: Libraries

Additional Resources
:: Related Links
:: Bibliography

:: Sources

print-friendly format

Los Angeles: Departments


A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 

Earth and Space Sciences
East Asian Languages and Cultures
East Asian Studies
Economics
Education
Electrical Engineering
Engineering
English
English as a Second Language
Environmental Health Sciences
Environmental Science and Engineering
Epidemiology
Ethnomusicology
European Studies


Earth and Space Sciences
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

East Asian Languages and Cultures
Formal instruction was first offered in Chinese and Japanese at the Los Angeles campus in the fall of 1947, when a Department of Oriental Languages was organized by Richard C. Rudolph, chairman, with the assistance of Ensho Ashikaga and Yong C. Chu. The movement for such a department was initiated by Peter A. Boodberg, chairman of the parallel department at Berkeley. The curriculum in the fall of 1947 consisted of eight courses in language, literature and civilization; a total of 52 students were enrolled for this initial offering. Ten years later, in the fall of 1957, course offerings had risen to 21, including several in Arabic; the staff, including two members in Arabic, totaled seven. By this time enrollment had risen to 157 students. Arabic courses were later transferred to the Department of Near Eastern Languages.

In the fall of 1964, undergraduate and graduate courses totaled 39 and the staff, with Ashikaga as chairman, totaled 11. Students enrolled for courses in the department totaled 362; there were 22 majors in Oriental languages, of whom 15 were graduate students.

A master's degree program was started in 1958, and a Ph.D. program was being planned in the mid-1960s. Instruction in the Mongolian language was offered in the fall of 1965, and Vietnamese was offered the following year.

There were no Chinese or Japanese books in the campus library when instruction was first offered in these languages. Large-scale purchasing in China in 1948-49, just before the country was closed to Americans, provided a firm foundation for the Chinese side. The Japanese collection was gradually built up, regular additions were made to the Chinese collection, and the combined total amounts to about 80,000 volumes. These library facilities were significantly enriched in 1964 with the moving of the Monumenta Serica Sinological Research Institute to the Los Angeles campus from Japan. The institute brought its library, formerly in Fu Jen University, Peking, also numbering about 80,000 volumes, and placed it on long-term loan in the Oriental Library where it may be used by qualified faculty and students, although the title remained with the institute. The institute was responsible for the editing and publishing of the well-known journal of Chinese studies, Monumenta Serica. This work was done in association with the department and was published under the UCLA bannerline. source

to top

East Asian Studies
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Economics
The Department of Economics had its origins in the establishment of the Southern Branch of the University on July 24, 1919. It was then known as the Department of Commercial Practice, offering only lower division courses, one of which was a year course in elementary economics; the others pertained to commercial practices. The staff consisted of three members.

In 1920, the name was changed to the Department of Commerce. Additional courses in commerce, such as accounting and transportation were added in 1921, and in 1923, the Regents authorized the department to offer upper division work for the junior year. In 1924, the name was changed to the Department of Economics which was then authorized to give instruction in the fourth year leading to the A.B. degree. The first class graduated in 1925, with 12 students receiving the bachelor's degree.

The department took on more of the characteristics of a department of economics in 1925, when it added courses in history of economic doctrine, labor, social reform and public finance. Its composite nature, however, was emphasized by the addition of courses in accounting, business organization and administration and personnel management. Instruction was offered for majors in economics, and teaching credentials; particular emphasis was laid on preparation for professional accounting, for which the department gained an enviable reputation.

With the establishment of the College of Business Administration, economics became a separate department in the College of Letters and Science in 1936. It was left with the lower division course in Principles of Economics and 11 upper division courses, including two in sociology. The staff was reduced to seven members. In 1937, a separate curriculum in sociology was added and the staff expanded to nine members. In 1940, sociology was transferred to anthropology and the department became a Department of Economics only, for the first time.

The department embarked on its program of graduate work in 1933, with graduate courses in the history of economic doctrine, economic theory, monetary theory, and accounting. In June, 1934, five candidates received the M.A. degree. Significant expansion in the graduate program had to await the end of World War II. In 1946, the department was authorized to offer work leading to the Ph.D. degree. The first Ph.D. in economics was conferred in June, 1948.

After 1948, the department expanded rapidly. The curriculum was broadened to cover almost every phase of economic instruction at both the upper division and graduate levels. The teaching staff expanded from eight members in 1946 to 34 members in 1965, of whom 23 were full-time instructors. There were also 19 teaching assistants. The lower division enrollment for the fall semester of 1964 was 885 students: 1,366 upper division, 127 graduate. source

to top

Education
See Colleges and Schools, School of Education.

to top

Engineering
See Colleges and Schools, College of Engineering.

to top

Electrical Engineering
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

English
When the Los Angeles State Normal School opened its doors in 1882, a required three-year program in English awaited all students with instruction in writing, reading, spelling, grammar, composition, and literature. By the turn of the century, the English staff had grown from one to a total of five members. Two literary societies were founded, the Normal Literary Society (coeducational) and the Webster Society ("composed of young gentlemen only"); the latter group founded the first campus paper, The Normal Exponent, in a four-page issue of January, 1894, which was rapidly expanded to 20 pages with faculty encouragement.

In 1905, the Department of English was formally created and grew to a staff of 13 before the Los Angeles State Normal School became the Southern Branch of the University. The work of the department was organized under the subject headings of grammar, composition, and literature, with a special staff for reading (with recitals) out of which the Departments of Theatre Arts and of Speech grew. Instruction in librarianship was also offered at one period.

The transfer to the Southern Branch entailed the recruitment of a faculty with graduate degrees and the development first of an English major and later of graduate programs, which began in 1935, the first doctorate being awarded in 1943. National and international scholarly recognition came to the department through the distinguished books of Lily Bess Campbell, the founding of the Augustan Society Reprints (1946), The Trollopian (1945) which became the Journal of Nineteenth Century Fiction (1949), and the University of California edition of the Works of John Dryden, beginning in 1956. Further recognition came from the establishment in 1956 of the Ewing Lectures to bring British and American men and women of distinguished achievement in the world of letters to the Los Angeles campus, and from the creation in 1957 of a special program for specialist teachers of English as a second language with overseas operations in the Philippines, Colombia, and Japan and with a joint degree program (one of the first established between a British and an American university) with the department of English Language and Literature at the University of Leeds. In 1950, the English Reading Room was opened for undergraduate students, and in 1960, the departmental Honors Program began.

During these years of development, the enrollments in English increased steadily. By the mid-1960s, the department enrolled more than 19,000 students annually (not including summer sessions), and had over 13,000 undergraduate majors and nearly 400 graduate students. Thus it was the largest department in the College of Letters and Science on the Los Angeles campus and one of the largest English departments in the country in the number of its students. source

to top

English as a Second Language
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Environmental Health Sciences
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Environmental Science and Engineering
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Epidemiology
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

Ethnomusicology
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top

European Studies
There is no history currently available for this department.

to top


A  B  C  D  E  F  G  H  I  J  K  L  M  N  O  P  Q  R  S  T  U  V  W  X  Y  Z 

 
 
the UC History Digital Archives

Copyright © 1999-2005
The Regents of the University of California. All rights reserved.
Last updated 06/18/04.