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Russia/Soviet Union

Revealing Russia Series.

The noted Russian filmmaker Marina Goldovskaia turns her camera on herself, her family, and her friends to examine the opportunities and challenges now facing people in the rapidly-changing Russian society. The Shattered Mirror. The noted Russian filmmaker turns her camera on herself, her family, and her friends to examine the opportunities and challenges now facing people in the rapidly-changing Russian society. Includes scenes of tense street confrontations between opposing political forces. The Shattered Mirror Part II.

Revolution in Red.(World War I series)

Archival newsreel footage surveys the forces and factors leading to the Russian revolution and the role of Lenin and his diciplined Bolshevik Party. A CBS News production; producers, John Sharnik, Isaac Kleinerman; written by John Sharnik. Originally produced by CBS Television in 1964-1965. 25 min. each installment. 28 min.

Revue (Predstavlenie)

A narration-free compilation of documentary scenes from the Soviet way of life. Excerpts from newsreels, propaganda films, TV shows and feature films present an evocative portrait of Soviet life during the 1950s and the 1960s. The cumulative impact reveals a life of hardship, deprivation and seemingly absurd social rituals, but one always inspired by the vision, or illusion, of a communist future. Revue is both a nostalgic and instructive look back at a communist past that represents social engineering on a grand, and frightening, scale. A film by Sergei Loznitsa. 2008. 80 min.

Russia and America: Where Do We Go From Here?.

Handel Evans (San Jose State U.), Evgenyi Tretyakov (Ural State U.), Andre Bril (Dir., Quorus Group), Alexander Ponomaryov (Russian businessman), Elena Budanova (Artist, Russian businesswoman), Natalia Vetrova (Dept. of Soc. Services), Mark Brown (USAID), Nataliya Shcherbakova (Dir., Housing construction company), Nikolay Semikhatov (Dir., former Soviet factory), Wilbur Wright (IESC), Vladimir Gabanov (Russian physicist), Tamara Alaiba (Russian politician). Discusses Russia's difficult transition from state socialism to capitalist democracy.

Russia In Transition: Fabrika.

A stunning visually tour through the belly of an old Soviet industrial plant in the Urals filmed in 2004. While male workers toil over fiery blast furnaces, pour molten steel into giant casting ladles, and hammer metal spikes into colossal machines, their female counterparts operate the assembly lines, endlessly moving clay blocks from one conveyor belt to another. The film presents an unapologetic questioning of Russia's ability to emerge as a modern industrial nation in the 21st century. 2004. 30 min. Dist. By Cinema Guild. Produced, directed and edited by Sergei Loznitsa

Russia In Transition: Haltepunkt.

In this haunting film, set inside an isolated train depot in rural Russia at nightime, everyone is asleep. Without narration and bathed in a ghostly light, the film has been described as a metaphor for what people in Russia are feeling today, a sense of "falling out of time." 2001. 24 min. Dist. By Cinema Guild. Produced, directed and edited by Sergei Loznitsa

Russia In Transition: Portret.

What first appear to be photographs of elderly Russian peasants and farmers, becomes an evocative meditation on old Russia and new, a snapshot of a disappearing way of life. As they stand in their work clothes, often with tools by their side, looking into the camera, this remarkable film with poetic rigor, captures a people, a world, that is quickly vanishing. 2002. 30 min. Dist. By Cinema Guild. Produced, directed and edited by Sergei Loznitsa

Russia In Transition: Poselenie.

This visually arresting documentary about a strange community in the Russian countryside, shows residents of a rural settlement seemingly involved in everyday farm work -- harvesting fields, chopping wood, working at a sawmill and maintaining the property. Yet, as the film evolves, the viewer comes to realize that the workers, are in fact, patients. Their daily chores serve only therapeutic purposes. Suffused with the sounds and rhythms of rural life, is the film a parable of post-Soviet society or simply a testament to the importance of nature in modern lives? 2001. 79 min. Dist.

Russia's Fracturing Federation ( Power of Place: World Regional Geography ; 7-8.).

Prog. 7. Facing ethnic and environmental diversity: Dagestan, Russia's southern challenge. Vologda, Russia's farming in flux.--Prog. 8. Central and remote economic development: Saint Petersburg, Russia's window on the West. Bratsk, the legacy of central planning.

Russia's War: Blood Upon the Snow

A 10 part documentary on the struggles of the Soviet people during World War II. 51 min. each installment. 1995. The Darkness Descends. In this first segment Lenin dies and leaves behind a power stuggle for the leadership of the Soviet empire. He also leaves a testament--a fatal warning against Stalin's ambition. Nevertheless, Stalin rises to power and begins his war against the Soviet people: an assault on the peasantry, mysterious assassinations of political rivals, and on the eve of the war with Germany, his disastrous purge of the Red Army. The Hour Before Midnight.

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