2011 Prize Winners

Chase Burton

Spare the Cell, Spoil the Child: The History and Philosophy of American Juvenile Justice

Christina Flores They Rule the Valley: The Story of How Large Central Valley Landholders Became the Primary Beneficiaries of the Central Valley Project
Helen Kim 'I Miss Green:' A Comparison of Prison and Space Shuttle Design
Zachary O'Hagan Proto-Omagua-Kokama: Grammatical sketch and prehistory
Mark Rodgers Taste, Gender, and Nation in the Material Culture of Domestic Musical Performance: The Pocket Opera Anthology in England, 1724-6
Preeti Talwai Praying through Politics, Ruling Through Religion: The Rajarajeswaram as an Instrument of Economic and Political Unification in the Chola Empire

Chase Burton
Spare the Cell, Spoil the Child: The History and Philosophy of American Juvenile Justice
Legal Studies H195A
Prof. Michael Musheno

For his honors thesis in Legal Studies, Mr. Burton wrote a history of the American juvenile justice system from 1899-1967, with a focus on changing philosophies and attitudes towards punishment for juveniles. He discovered that the University Library had in its print collection institutional reports from reform and industrial schools, which he used as primary sources. He also used library databases such as Making of Modern Law to read contemporary texts on youth criminology, and was granted access by the Law School to Westlaw and Lexis-Nexis to read the case law. Prof. Musheno, Director of the Legal Studies Program and Lecturer in Residence at Berkeley Law School, wrote that “It is in studying original writings generated over time and correlating these with changes in legal practices that make Mr. Burton’s thesis outstanding.”

top


Christina Flores
They Rule the Valley: The Story of How Large Central Valley Landholders Became the Primary Beneficiaries of the Central Valley Project
History 101
Prof. Kathryn Eigen

Ms. Flores wrote her senior thesis in History on one aspect of 1940’s federal irrigation regulation in California’s Central Valley. She describes how the Valley’s largest landowners were able to use the Central Valley Project to their own advantage, despite the intentions of the United States Bureau of Reclamation, which was managing the project. Ms. Flores used many different types of sources, including congressional hearings and reports, newspaper archives, and the Bancroft Library’s Paul S. Taylor Papers, among others. Kathryn Eigen, Ms. Flores’ thesis advisor, wrote that “Christina has never been satisfied with merely recounting events. Instead, she has worked and reworked her arguments to make them as clear as possible and to make the best use of the materials that she has found.”

top


Helen Kim
'I Miss Green:' A Comparison of Prison and Space Shuttle Design
College Writing R4B
Prof. Maggie Sokolik

In “‘I Miss Green:’ A Comparison of Prison and Space Shuttle Design”, Helen Kim examines the role of design in two disparate examples of confined space. Using materials available from Doe, Engineering, Environmental Design, Education-Psychology, and Moffitt libraries, as well as articles from numerous databases, she developed an annotated bibliography that allowed her to organize her comparison along three lines: general structure, psychological effects, and economic efficiency. Helen also took advantage of the Library’s Research Advisory Service and Chat Reference to assist her in exploring the “nature of architecture as a mediator of society’s thoughts and interactions.” In the words of her College Writing instructor, Helen’s paper is “an example of outstanding interdisciplinary work.”

top


Zachary O'Hagan
Proto-Omagua-Kokama: Grammatical sketch and prehistory
Linguistics H195B
Prof. Lev Michael

Mr. O’Hagan’s Lingustics honors thesis explores the history of several endangered Amazonian languages. He demonstrates that two of these languages, Omagua and Kokama, “were already distinct languages by the time the Jesuits arrived in the Amazon,” as his thesis advisor, Professor Lev Michael, writes. In addition to his fieldwork in Peru, Mr. O’Hagan made extensive use of collections on the Berkeley campus and at NRLF, corresponded with scholars in Europe and South America, and used Interlibrary Loan to access books and letters by early explorers and missionaries to the Amazon region. Professor Michael writes that “Quite simply, Zach increased by a factor of at least ten the amount of Old Omagua material known to linguists by his meticulous and creative searching through the Jesuit materials.”

top


Mark Rodgers
Taste, Gender, and Nation in the Material Culture of Domestic Musical Performance: The Pocket Opera Anthology in England, 1724-6
Music 195H
Prof. Davitt Moroney

Mark Rogers’s Honor’s Thesis, “Taste, Gender and Nation in the Material Culture of Musical Performance, the Pocket Opera Anthology in England 1724-6,” explores this “small but circumscribed genre of pocket books for gentlemen and ladies… primarily offering songs and arias from Italian operas” for performance by amateurs in domestic situations as apposed to the operatic stage. Despite admittedly sparse documentation on such private performances, Mark’s research was exhaustive, leading him to several libraries, including the Business Library to track down information about Italian businessmen in early 18th century London, and the Environmental Design Library to seek information on 18th century dress “(since the books were designed for pockets)”. Mark also used digital sources from Early English Books Online and Eighteenth-Century Collections Online, as well as availing himself of the rich resources in original 18th century editions in the Hargrove Music Library. Mark’s advisor, Prof. Davitt Moroney, calls his writing “mature and elegant, with intellectual subtlety and wit. He makes full use of all the resource available to him…like a professional scholar…. I am delighted by his vast and playful exploration of the non-musical dimensions of these pocket books, including questions of fashion, dress, iconography…and the all-pervasive issues of class and commerce with studies of print culture.” Prof. Moroney adds that “if the Prize is partly designed to identify young researchers who use library resources, and to encourage them as they go forward in their careers, working with library materials, then here is a truly exceptional candidate.”

top


Preeti Talwai
Praying through Politics, Ruling Through Religion: The Rajarajeswaram as an Instrument of Economic and Political Unification in the Chola Empire
Architecture 170A
Prof. Andrew Shanken

Preeti Talwai provides an original and multi-layered reading of the Rajarajeswaram temple in 11th century southern India. Through images and words, Preeti demonstrates how she drew from broad and specialized resources of the UC Berkeley Library (in many locations and formats) to construct an informed and engaging paper on the significance of one particular Hindu temple, built between 1003 and 1010 C.E., and during the apogee of the Chola Empire under Rajaran I. She made use of both OskiCat and Melvyl to search across UC collections, and she used the Avery Index to Architectural Periodicals, JSTOR, and other electronic article databases to gather both Western and Eastern perspectives on the Rajarajeswaram. The photographs and drawings which didactically and beautifully embellish her paper were scanned from books from the Environmental Design Library or discovered in the Library’s subscription to the ARTstor Digital Library. Preeti’s well-thought out and iterative research strategy included a careful analysis of the temple’s physical space based on primary visual sources, followed by searches for diverse interpretations in secondary literature. Not the likely location for architecture or primary sources on India, Preeti even consulted seminar archives that reside in the Bancroft Library to support her thesis that Rajaraja I combined architectural forms and structure with art, iconography, sculpture, and inscription to create a temple to Shiva that transcended the realm of Hinduism as it was known until his rule.

top