2009 Prize Winners

Christine Russell

"We Don't Scare Easily": The Gary Case and Housing Discrimination in Richmond, Ca, 1952

Jaimee Comstock-Skipp Whose Painted Reality? Redefining Orientalism in British Representations of the Sultan Hasan Mosque in Cairo
Jesse Hoffman A Family of Prophets in 2nd Century Roman Egypt
Mark Mallery Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Lands for Cannabbis Cultivation
Kelly Fabian Dissecting Andreas Vesalius's Epitome

Christine Russell
"We Don't Scare Easily": The Gary Case and Housing Discrimination in Richmond, CA, 1952
History 101
Professor Waldo Martin

Christine Russell’s senior thesis "We Don't Scare Easily": The Gary Case and Housing Discrimination in Richmond, Ca, 1952, documents the extreme white opposition towards the Gary family’s move into Rollingwood, a previously all-white Richmond subdivision. In her paper, Christine explores how the police upheld the law in theory, but not in practice, and the importance of the NAACP and community support in supporting the Garys in their fight to remain in their home. The Newspapers/Microforms collection in Doe was essential to Christine’s research with access to the San Francisco Chronicle and the Oakland Tribune and black-owned newspapers like the Sun-Reporter. Even the Communist Party’s Daily People’s World reported on the Gary case. Christine also found an oral history from the Regional Oral History Office and the NAACP archives at Bancroft to be crucial to her report. However, the most important source was a personal interview Christine arranged with Constance Gary, a child of the Gary’s.

Christine’s advisor writes “Ms. Russell has written a well conceived, thoughtfully argued, and compelling essay that showcases not only the range of our local and national NAACP collections, but also the strength of the West Coast branch office as evidenced in their files in particular.”

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Jaimee Comstock-Skipp
Whose Painted Reality? Redefining Orientalism in British Representations of the Sultan Hasan Mosque in Cairo
Near Eastern Studies H195
Professor Margaret Larkin

Jaimee Comstock Skipp’s honors thesis, “Whose Painted Reality? Redefining Orientalism in British Representations of the Sultan Hasan Mosque in Cairo, led her from Berkeley to London to Egypt. Aided by travel grants, Jaimee was able to view key works in London museums and archives and then by traveling to Egypt, see the actual sites depicted in the artworks. Jaimee ultimately concentrated her research efforts on the Sultan Hasan Mosque as it was the site where she had both “a profusion of nineteenth century artistic responses” and physical access. Back in Berkeley, Jaimee found published travelogues from the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries at Bancroft and the Environmental Design Library that helped to contextualize the artwork in their time period. Her paper’s final selection of images “invites the reader to look at this large corpus from numerous sources never before grouped together.”

Jaimee’s advisor writes, “Jamiee’s contribution extends beyond the limits of art history, for the nuanced sensibility and expanded theoretical approach that she argues for will inform studies not only of Orientalist art in the future, but also all fields related to Near Eastern studies, from history to literature to the social sciences.”

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Jesse Hoffman
A Family of Prophets in 2nd Century Roman Egypt
Classics H195
Professor Todd Hickey

Jesse Hoffman researched five Greek-language papyri from Roman Egypt for his Classics Honors course in classical civilization (H195) for his project, A Family of Prophets in 2nd Century Roman Egypt . Four of the five papyri which were related to a known family archive and the fifth was unrelated but of the same time period. Of the five, three were in The Center for the Tebtunis Papyri (CTP) at the Bancroft; one was in the Beinecke Library (Yale) and the other in the Lunds universitetsbibliotek (Sweden). Jesse first deciphered the handwriting of each document and then created a working transcript of the Greek text. Once he had the transcription, the translation was next, and finally, an analysis of the translated text. In the process of translation and analysis, Jesse searched the Duke Database of Documentary Papyri (DDDP) to find references to relevant published papyri. Through the collections in Doe and Art History/Classics, he was able to locate and study these publications. These resources along with searches of JSTOR and the Bulletin of the American Society of Papyrologists were essential for his in-depth analysis of the translated text.

According to his advisor, “Mr. Hoffman’s senior thesis is a “remarkable piece of professional research. The fact that it is nearly ready for peer-reviewed publication is testament to the rigor with which Mr. Hoffman used the library resources here at Berkeley and at other institutions.”

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Mark Mallery
Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Lands for Cannabis Cultivation
Interdisciplinary Field Studies 195
Professor Renate Holub

Mark Mallery’s, honor’s thesis, Marijuana National Forest: Encroachment on California Lands for Cannabis Cultivation, began as an environmental problem-solving term paper and as he says, it “turned into an honors thesis and long term public education project.” Mark explored his topic from all perspectives including legal propositions, scholarly research and environmental assessment field notes. When he exhausted these sources, he identified key experts and interviewed them to gather information crucial to the research project. In the process, Mark has produced a thorough review of the topic, including proposals for policies that could change current trends in marijuana production on public lands.

Mark’s thesis advisor writes that “Mark has taken many very complex issues that cover a wide range of legal, social and environmental issues and developed a concise and well written thesis.”

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Kelly Fabian
Dissecting Andreas Vesalius's Epitome
Undergraduate Seminar on Archival Research UGIS 39B
Professor James Casey, Mechanical Engineering
Peter Hanff, Bancroft Library
David Farrell, Bancroft Library

Kelly Fabian’s enthusiasm for Renaissance art was the spark that caused her to request Andreas Vesalisus’s Epitome from the Bancroft vault for her Undergraduate Seminar on Archival Research project. The Epitome, a monument in the history of printing and culture, was published in 1543 as an anatomy textbook for medical students. Kelly says she was immediately “hooked” when she held the item; its size and image quality were impressive. She adds, “Even better, the pages were stained with the memories of dissections long ago, something I found simultaneously revolting and fascinating.” In her research paper Kelly focuses on the image of the female cadaver on the title page and relates it to the role of the female form in renaissance art. In addition to the Bancroft Library, Kelly found resources through the Art History, Classics and Bioscience Libraries to support her analysis that Vesalius was attempting to probe the secret of human creation in his dissection of the female reproductive organs.

Kelly’s advisor writes that she “brought her own perspective, as a student of Renaissance art, and as a modern young woman, to bear on the analysis of the drawings. In them, she deciphers much more than the important anatomical details they were created primarily to depict.”

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