UC Berkeley Library

Movies with Notable Food Scenes

Alice Adams (1935)

Directed by George Stevens. Cast: Katharine Hepburn, Fred MacMurray, Fred Stone, Evelyn Venable, Hattie McDaniel. Social climber Alice tries to push her clodhopper family to the background and assumes airs to win the love of an amiable, wealthy young man. In this tender comedy of Americana and manners each must overcome the obstacles of their backgrounds for their love to flourish.

Annie Hall (1977)

Directed by Woody Allen, Cast: Woody Allen, Diane Keaton, Tony Roberts, Carol Kane, Paul Simon. A romantic and sensitive comedy revolving around the diverse and diverting relationships of two nervous New Yorkers, Alvie Singer and Annie Hall.

Austin Powers, The Spy Who Shagged Me (1999)

Directed by Jay Roach. Cast: Mike Myers, Heather Graham, Michael York, Rob Lowe, Robert Wagner, Seth Green and Elizabeth Hurley. "The best opening credits of the 1999 summer movie season belonged to this outrageous sequel, in which the titles flash while breads, meats, and produce are strategically placed in front of characters' naked physiques. This several-minute buffet of visual puns includes melons held in front of breasts, a male groin hidden by a salami, and a baked ham to mask the bum of cheeky Agent Powers (Mike Myers).

Autumn Moon (Qiuyue) (Hong Kong / Japan, 1992)

Directed by Clara Law. Cast: Masatoshi Nagase, Li Pui Wai, Choi Siu Wan, Maki Kiuchi. Set in contemporary Hong Kong, a young Japanese tourist is bargain-shopping and looking for food, sex, or preferably both. He meets a fifteen-year-old waif and the friendship that develops allows the young man's passion for food to be assuaged by the girl's grandmother, the wielder of a magic wok. But sex is a different matter than friendship--which is what this film is really about. 102 min. ; Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

Battle of the Century (1928)

Cast: Laurel and Hardy. Features a monumental, metropolitan pie fight in which no one is spared. 28 min. ; ; :1903

Behind the Screen (1916)

Directed by Charles Chaplin. Cast: Charlie Chaplin, Edna Purviance. Charlie is an overworked labourer at a film studio who helps a young woman find work even while his coworkers strike against his tyrannical boss. A satire of life at a silent movie studio, a thinly veiled satire of Mack Sennett's Keystone Company. In one scene, Charlie is on a lunch break with fellow stagehands, but without a lunch. "One stagehand has spread out a great stack of sandwhiches before him, another has unwrapped the remains of a leg of beef, while another has brought a large bunch of green onions.

Christmas Story (1985)

Directed by Bob Clark. Cast: Melinda Dillon, Darren McGavin, Peter Billingsley. A young boy must convince his parents that a toy rifle is the only Christmas gift that will make Christmas worthwhile. Not only do his parents face what many other parents must deal with during the holiday, but their actions reflect the classic All-American response to Christmas. Contains possibly the most hilariously catastrophically derailed Christmas dinners in movie history Based on the novel "In God We Trust, All Others Pay Cash" by Jean Shepherd. 98 min.

Chungking Express (Chung-ching sen lin) (Hong Kong, 1994)

Directed by Wong Kar-Wai. Cast: Tony Leung Chiu-Wai and Brigitte Lin."From supreme visual stylist Wong Kar-wai comes this stunning, dream-likevalentine to youth and hopeless love. Kar-wai juxtaposes two quirky, offbeatstories with beautiful, mysterious women and colorful cops against a backdropof a Chinese fast-food restaurant. An emotionally cool, post-modern romanticcomedy. "...an ideal introduction to his work...a vibrant commentary on younglove today, packed with punch and personality" (Jonathan Rosenbaum, ChicagoReader).

Don't be a Menace to South Central while Drinking your Juice in the Hood (1996)

Directed by Paris Barclay. Cast: Shawn Wayans, Marlon Wayans. From block parties and beepers to high tops and high-powered weapons, it's everything that's funny about growing up in the 'hood ... the Wayans Brothers' neighborhood, that is! "A parody of the spate of contemporary black urban ghetto films distributed in the late eighties and early nineties. The Wayans brothers tackle the elements of these films that became distracting cliches, such as the unhealthy, low-price food the characters eat.

Five Easy Pieces (1970)

Directed by Bob Rafelson. Cast: Jack Nicholson, Karen Black, Susan Anspach, Lois Smith, Billy Green Bush, William Challee. In the most memorable classic scene in a roadside diner on his way home, he is again aggravated and exasperated by meaningless rules. A live-by-the-rules waitress (Lorna Thayer) stubbornly refuses to serve him a plain omelette (with tomatoes instead of potatoes), a cup of coffee and a side order of wheat toast, because she dryly explains: "No substitutions":
Dupea: I'd like a plain omelette, no potatoes, tomatoes instead, a cup of coffee, and wheat toast.

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