UC Berkeley Library

Latin American Studies

Battle of Chile: The Struggle of an Unarmed People Part 1: The Bourgeois Insurrection.

The first film in a two-part documentary on the fate of Allende's Popular Unity government filmed throughout Chile from February to September 1973. Part one examines the escalation of rightist opposition following the left's victory in Congressional elections held in March, 1973. Finding that parliamentary democracy would not stop Allende's socialist policies, the right-wing shifted its tactics from the polls to the streets. The film follows months of activity as a variety of increasingly violent tactics are used by the right to weaken the government and provoke a crisis.

Battle of Chile: The Struggle of an Unarmed People Part 2: The Coup.

The second film in a two-part documentary on the fate of Allende's Popular Unity government filmed throughout Chile from February to September 1973. Part two opens with the attempted military coup of June, 1973, which is put down by troops loyal to the government but everyone now realizes the final showdown is only a matter of time. The film shows a left divided over strategy, while the right methodically lays the groundwork for the military seizure of power.

Before Reggae Hit the Town.

Discussion of the roots of reggae and ska in the music and dance of Jamaica's traditional African religion, with scenes of religious ceremonies and sacrifices; also contains scenes of Rastafarians and their music. Filmed and recorded in the parish of St. Ann, Jamaica. c1990. 22 min.

Before We Knew Nothing: With the Ashaninka of Eastern Peru

A portrait of the life and culture of the Ashaninka (also called the Campa), who inhabit the Amazon rainforest of eastern Peru, as well as a profound reflection on the experience of living and filming among people who continue to resist acculturation. Filmmaker, Diane Kitchen, spent seven months living with the Ashaninka. Her camera reveals the activities of men and women, the lush tropical environment, and the emotional climate of daily life. 1989. 62 min.

Benedita da Silva

Documentary on Benedita da Silva, the first Black woman Senator in Brazil. As a resident of the Chapeu Mangueira slum in Rio de Janeiro, she ran for office and was elected federal representative in 1986 and ran again for re-election in 1990. This is her story along with her views on social conditions in Brazilian and on the Brazilian political process today. Directed by Eunice Gutman. Dist. Cinema Guild. 1990. 30 min.

Betraying Amnesia, Portraying Ourselves: Video Portraits by Latin American and Latino Artists

The diversity of films in this program present representations as broad as the cultural and historical circumstances that have shaped the many cultures within Latin American and US Latino/a communities. This particular group of video makers have politicized their work by visualizing these unique geographical characteristics and by forging links between self, history, and memory. The exploration and experimentations represent here constitute a politically charged and significant contribution to what we know as video portraiture.

Between Light and Shadow: Maya Women in Transition.

Interviews with Mayan women artists who work to preserve Mayan culture, improve the lives of the Mayan people and promote a Maya presence in their community. Includes Mayan folk art in the form of woven textiles and embroidery and contemporary paintings. 1997. 26 min.
Related web sites:Description from Berkeley Media LLC catalog

Between Midnight and the Rooster's Crow

Multinationals are working to extract billions of dollars of oil reserves from beneath Ecuador's rainforest. This film documents the environmental and social impact the EnCana Corporation is having on Ecuador as they build a heavy crude pipeline from the Amazon, across the Andes, to the Pacific coast. Also looks at the relationship between EnCana and the government of Eduador. Directed, produced and written by Nadja Drost. 2005. 66 min.
Related web sites:Description from Icarus Films catalog

Birdsong and Coffee: A Wake Up Call

Explores the inextricable economic and environmental connections between farmers in Latin America, coffee drinkers in the U.S., and the fate of migratory songbirds throughout the Americas.

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