UC Berkeley Library

Global & Human Rights Issues

Not for Sale

This documentary explores some little-known aspects of global trade agreements. Patents and other intellectual property rights are expanding what corporations can own and control -- from machines to knowledge and even living creatures. What does this mean for the environment, the food supply and human rights? This film looks at farmers, indigenous people, and global justice activists who oppose patents on life and advocate for a world where life is not a commodity but something to be treasured. c2002. 32 min.

On Our Watch

The world invoked its vow 'Never again!' after the genocide in Rwanda and atrocities in Srebrenica. Then came Darfur. Over the past four years at least 200,000 people have been killed, 2.5 million driven from their homes, and mass rapes have once more been used as a weapon of war in a brutal campaign by Janjaweed militias and the Sudanese government against civilians in Darfur. This documentary asks why the international community and the United Nations have once again failed to stop the slaughter. Written, produced & directed by Neil Docherty.

Outsourcing: White Collar Exodus

Contents: The death of distance -- A twist of the twine -- My job went to India and all I got was this lousy t-shirt -- Regulation -- Good-bye middle class -- Sushi and tulips -- There is only one constant: change.

Planet Work.

Has your job gone global? The television newsprogram Livelyhood packs its bags and heads to Italy, Ghana, Cambodia, Guatemala, India, Singapore and New England in this 2 part series on how the global economy is transforming work life. Neither a condemnation of the effects of economic globalization nor a celebration of it, this is an informative look at how the mass movement of information, products and people is affecting everything from national cultures to the nature of work and the patterns of individual lives. Originally broadcast on the PBS television program: Livelyhood. 2001.

Politics of Food. (1988) 20 min. each installment.

The Food Machine. Discusses the farm crisis in the United States in which small farms are being bought by large corporations. This pattern has been transplanted to underdeveloped countries, such as the Sudan resulting in increased food costs and a destabilizing of the rural population. . The Avoidable Famine. Examines the impact of changes in traditional farming methods on the economy of Sudan.

Politics of Food: A Question of Aid.

Discusses the different approaches to the problem of hunger in Kerala, india and Bangladesh. In Kerala government-run "fair price shops" assure that every person can afford basic nutrition and government developed programs assure high standards of health, education and birth control. Bangladesh, however, is heavily dependent on foreign aid, most of which is used to support the urban middle class while the rural poor remain malnourished, uneducated and trapped in a cycle of poverty. (1988) 20 min.

Politics of Food: Sharing the Land.

Discusses the costs of rapid industrial expansion in Brazil and the need for land reform. Brazil's "economic miracle" of the 1970's was supposed to "trickle down" to the poorest segments of the population but only the top 10% of the population benefitted from the economic policy, while the gap between rich and poor grew. The resulting huge debt has caused an even greater emphasis on the export of food, causing shortages and higher prices in Brazil. (1988) 20 min.

Politics of Food: The Avoidable Famine.

Examines the impact of changes in traditional farming methods on the economy of Sudan. When the Sudan was a colony of Great Britain, the best farm land was used to grow cotton but a drop in cotton prices in the 1970's dictated a return to traditional food crops, which made the Sudan self-sufficient in food. Then the International Monetary Fund insisted that the nation return to growing cotton as a condition for making loans to the Sudan. Cotton prices remained low and the nation was forced to import grain from the U.S.--thus pushing the Sudan deeper into debt while the people starved.

Politics of Food: The Food Machine.

Discusses the farm crisis in the United States in which small farms are being bought by large corporations. This pattern has been transplanted to underdeveloped countries, such as the Sudan resulting in increased food costs and a destabilizing of the rural population. (1988) 20 min.

Politics of Food: The Hunger Business.

Film examines how the international trade of agricultural products effects underdeveloped nations. The U.S., as the world's dominant producer of cerealgrains, is an important player in the global trade of food. Grain exports are seen in the U.S. as a good way of eliminating agricultural surpluses but food aid can prevent poor nations from becoming self-sufficient because the government of those nations has no incentive to develop policies to increase food production. (1988) 20 min.

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