UC Berkeley Library

Business & Economics in South Asia

Made in India.

Portrait of the women's organization in India, called SEWA, that holds to the simple yet radical belief that poor women need organizing, not welfare. Inspired by the political, economic and moral model advocated by Gandhi, SEWA has grown since it founding to a membership of 217,000 and its bank now has assets of over $4 million. SEWA is at its core a trade union for the self-employed that offers union membership to d) the illiterate women who sell vegetables, pick up scraps for recycling from the streets and engage in small cottage industries. A film by Patricia Plattner. 1998. 52 min.

Nalini by Day, Nancy by Night

A documentary about the outsourcing of American jobs to India. From the perspective of an Indian immigrant living in the United States, using humor and satire to capture the lives of Indian telemarketers who undergo voice and accent training to speak to U.S. customers with an American accent. A complex look at life as per Eastern Standard Time in India. A film by Sonali Gulati. 2005. 27 min.

Outsourcing: White Collar Exodus

Contents: The death of distance -- A twist of the twine -- My job went to India and all I got was this lousy t-shirt -- Regulation -- Good-bye middle class -- Sushi and tulips -- There is only one constant: change. More than two million jobs have been outsourced from the U.S. to India since 2000. This documentary explores factors that encourage the outsourcing (U.S. laws, special training and cheap wages in India ...) and the impact the outsourcing has on both the U.S. and Indian workers. Analysts consider possible U.S. policy and natural economic responses to the outsourcing.

SEWA: Self-employed Women's Association

A portrait of the women's organization in India, called SEWA, that holds to the simple yet radical belief that poor women need organizing, not welfare. Inspired by the political, economic and moral model advocated by Gandhi, SEWA has grown since it founding to a membership of 217,000 and its bank now has assets of over $4 million. SEWA is at its core a trade union for the self-employed that offers union membership to the illiterate women who sell vegetables, pick up scraps for recycling from the streets and engage in small cottage industries. 52 min. 1998.

Shipbreakers

Welcome to Alang, India, the site of a gargantuan scrap yard where ocean-going ships come to die. Forty thousand Indians live and work here, dismembering and scavenging the hulks of 400 vessels every year. This documentary chronicles the daily lives of the people who work here, the barefoot men who take apart giant mountains of steel by hand, piece by piece, as they spend months toiling sun-up to sun-down destroying ship after ship. It is the world's most unregulated industry. Ship owners rarely bother to abide by the UN Base Convention, which bans shipments of transboundary waste.

Sixteen Decisions

Examines the social charter of the Grameen Bank of Bangladesh and the 16 principles which undergird its success by examining the life of Selina, one of the 2.4 million Bangladeshi women building stronger rural economies through microcredit lending. 2000. 59 min.

Swayam

Documentary film on the short and long term impact of micro-credit mechanism on Women's self-help groups with reference to South India. A film by Arun Chadha. 2003. 30 min.

The Bomb Under the World.

An ornately decorated elephant leads a parade through anIndian village, in a promotional campaign for soap. Consumer society is coming, and India's growing population looks for the same goods and a similar living standard as the West enjoys. This film examines the consequences of Western-style consumerism in a large developing country. 1994 52 min.

The La$t Market

Featuring an interview with C. K. Prahalad, Professor of Corporate Strategy at the University of Michigan, "The Last Market" explains how the world's poor, who collectively have enormous buying power, represent an untapped engine of global economic growth. The film explores the pros and cons of strategies to market to the poor, questioning whether it is truly possible for corporations such as Philips to revamp capitalism so that it works for everyone. Can poverty be fought with profitability? Is this a win-win situation or merely a neocolonial strategy in disguise?

The Other Side of Outsourcing

What happens when the demands of the global economy with all of its excess baggage of Westernizing forces collides with the deeply held traditions of an age-old culture like India's? Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Thomas L. Friedman heads to the heart of the conflict and examines how this clash of cultures is affecting the everyday lives of Indian workers, many of them young people, who are caught in the middle.

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