UC Berkeley Library

African Studies

And What if Latif was Right! (Et si Latif avait raison!)

"This is treason! You know what would happen to you in another African country. You're lucky I'm a democrat," is how President Abdoulaye Wade of Senegal cuts down on TV a simple rational proposition for solving a regional crisis. In this razor-sharp analysis of Senegal's perverted democracy, Joseph Gaie Ramaka shows us how unlucky the Senegalese feel to have Wade as "a democrat." The film is based on journalist Abdoulatif's Coulibaly's denunciation of Wade's scandalously unmet promises for democratic change and pays homage to the victims of his regime. A film by Joseph Gai Ramaka. 2006.

Angano...Angano: Tales from Madagascar.

Contemporary storytellers recount the founding myths of Malagasy culture, the creation of man and woman, the origin of rice cultivation, the reason for animal sacrifice. 1989. 64 min.
Related web sites:Description from California Newsreel catalog

Arlit, The Second Paris (Arlit, deuxième Paris)

A case study in migration and environmental racism set in an uranium mining town in the Sahara desert of Niger. Here European corporations extracted nuclear power and profits, leaving behind illness due to radiation, contamination and unemployment. Arlit flourished during the oil crunch of the early 70s when its uranium mines employed 25, 000 workers from around the world in high paying jobs. It has now become a ghost town, a place of transit. A film by Idrissou Mora Kpai. 2005. 78 min.

Arlit, The Second Paris (Arlit, deuxi`eme Paris)

A case study in migration and environmental racism set in an uranium mining town in the Sahara desert of Niger. Here European corporations extracted nuclear power and profits, leaving behind illness due to radiation, contamination and unemployment. Arlit flourished during the oil crunch of the early 70s when its uranium mines employed 25, 000 workers from around the world in high paying jobs. It has now become a ghost town, a place of transit. A film by Idrissou Mora Kpai. 2005. 78 min.

Asinamali!.

This play, commissioned by the BBC, is written, directed, and acted by "The Committee Artists", a South African performing group. Five prisoners in a South African jail recall--through word, song, and dance--the events which have brought them there. "Asinamali" means we have no money. The men portrayed in "Asinamali" have been victimized by the laws, police brutality, unemployment, and humiliation of apartheid. Based on the play by Mbongeni Ngema. 1995. 66 min.

At Home and Abroad: The Two Faces of Jan Smuts

Examines the life of Jan Smuts, Afrikaner and prime minister of the Union of South Africa from 1919-1924 and 1939-1948. He was hailed in Europe as a peacemaker, but in South Africa he missed the opportunity to push for a more inclusive racial vision that could have saved the nation from years of turmoil and suffering. Features archival film footage with commentary by authors, academics and historians. Supplementary short issued with: The Adventures of young Indiana Jones. 2007. 32 min.

Bahia, Africa in the Americas.

Elements of African culture are powerfully expressed in the food, art, dance, and most importantly, the Candomble (Umbanda) religion of the Afro-Brazilian majority of the state of Bahia. 1988. 58 min.

Baka: People of the Forest

Depicts a journey to a rain forest in southeastern Cameroon, home of the Baka people. The camera follows a family -- father, mother, and two young sons -- for an intimate look at everyday life in a hunter-gatherer society. Viewers join the Baka by day as they harvest honey, catch fish, and use forest plants to make medicines and see them by night as legends are passed on and as a family prepares for the birth of a baby. Originally produced in 1988. 61 min.

Behind the Mask.

Examines some of the carved ceremonial masks of the Dogon tribe of Nigeria. Shows how these artifacts are created and explains how they are used in the Dogons' sacred rituals. 1976. 52 min.

Belonging.(Real stories from a free South Africa; v. 3)

Directed by Minky Schlesinger and Khetiwe Ngcobo. Born into exile as the daughter of political emigres, Kethiwe Ngcobo and her family returned to their longed-for homeland, South Africa in 1994. Now ten years later, Kethiwe, a hip, young woman with a British accent finds herself struggling to find her place in the new South Africa. Hoping to reconcile the warring strands of her identity, Khetiwe seeks healing in her Zulu traditions. At the same time, her sister refuses to participate in any ceremonies as meaningless rituals. Khetiwe is not alone in her journey to find belonging.

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