UC Berkeley Library

African Cinema

Matamata and Pilipili (Congo)

In the 1950s a Belgian missionary and a film fanatic in the Congo, Albert Van Haelst, made twenty films featuring the African Laurel and Hardy -- Matamata and Pilipili. This documentary presents several of these first colonial films to come from the Congo, reclaiming an important episode in the history of Congolese popular culture while exploring the complex terrain of colonial relationships and media representations. 55 min.

Moolaade (Senegal / France / Burkina Faso / Cameroon / Morocco / Tunisia, 2004)

Directed by Ousmane Sembene. Cast: Fatoumata Coulibaly, Maimouna Helene Diarra, Salimata Traore, Dominique T. Zeida, Mah Compaore, Aminata Dao. Set in a small village, four young girls face ritual "purification" decide to flee to the household of Colle Ardo Gallo Sy, a strong-willed woman who has managed to shield her own teenage daughter from the mutilation. Colle invokes the time-honored custom of moolaade (sanctuary) to protect the fugitives, and tension mounts as the ensuing stand-off pits Colle against village traditionalists.

Mortu Nega. (Guinea-Bissau , 1988)

Directed by Flora Gomes. Cast: Bia Gomes, Eugenio Almada, Uri Mamadu Baldo, M'Male Nhasse. "In 1973, independence was proclaimed, ending five centuries of Portuguese colonization and a decade of armed struggle. [This film], Gomes' first feature-length film, portrays this critical period in history through the story of one woman, Diminga, whose husband is fighting on the front lines. The camera captures Cabral's assassination, the ending of hostilities, and the reconstruction of the economically and spiritually devastated country struggling with drought and famine.

My American Nurse [Part 1] (Nigeria, 2006)

Directed by Pascal Atuma. Cast: Pascal Atuma, Vida Darko, Ashley Nwosu, Emeka Ani. Shehu, a Nigerian cab driver who's had less than stellar luck with women, recently had the misfortune of picking up a woman who wasn't one at all. Out of frustration, Shehu vows to never touch another American woman again. He travels home to Nigeria to find a wife and hang up his bachelor ways. His plan is to find a nurse so she can get certified in the USA and make enough money for him to stay home and drink beer if he so chooses.

My American Nurse [Part 2] (Nigeria, 2006)

Directed by Pascal Atuma. Cast: Pascal Atuma, Vida Darko, Ashley Nwosu, Emeka Ani. Shehu, a Nigerian cab driver who's had less than stellar luck with women, recently had the misfortune of picking up a woman who wasn't one at all. Out of frustration, Shehu vows to never touch another American woman again. He travels home to Nigeria to find a wife and hang up his bachelor ways. His plan is to find a nurse so she can get certified in the USA and make enough money for him to stay home and drink beer if he so chooses.

My Idol (Nigeria, 2008)

Directed by Tchidi Chikere. Cast: Genevieve Nnaji, Yemi Blaq, Ofia Afuluagu Mbaka. Ifunanya, the princes of Edemele, suffers from a secret forbidden love for Obiozor, the warrior of Abia. Does love really conquer all? 124 min. Credits and other information from the Internet Movie Database

My Mother's Tears (Nigeria, 2000?)

Directed by Ifeanyi Ogbonna. Cast: Pete Edochie, Ngozi Ezeonu, Tony Umez, Uche Jombo, Ikem Chude, Joy Helen Chima is in for revenge and his friends are willing to help him get back at whoever caused his mother's sorrow which led to her death. Chima together with his friends holds the igwe [Chief] in council including his grandfather for ransome demanding money and an escort out of the village and that's just the beginning.... Sequel: Why Me, Father. 140 min.

Nagstappie (A Walk in the Night) (South Africa, 1998)

Directed by Mickey Madoda Dube. Recounts a single terrible night in South Africa when the fragile world of Mikey Adonis, a young coloured steel worker, disintegrates; illustrates how a decent man can be driven to an act of brutality by a racist society which humiliates him at every turn. Adaptation of an Alex La Guma short story. In English and Afrikaans with English subtitles. 79 min. ;
Related web sites:Description from California Newsreel catalog
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Naliaka is Going (Kenya, 2003)

Directed by Albert Wandago. Cast: Benta Ochieng (Naliaka) ; Ken Ambani (Pik). Filmed in Kenya, this film is based on an authentic story about a 14 year old girl (Naliaka) who drops out of school to work as domestic help to sustain her family. She learns typing and improves her spoken and written English with assistance from her employers' children. Moving to the city, Naliaka works as a typist. She grows disenchanted with the job. At the same time her friend, Pik, driven by ulterior motives at first, begins to genuinely care for and fall in love with Naliaka. PAL format VHS tape.

Ndeysaan (Le prix du pardon; The Price of Forgiveness) (Senegal / France, 2001)

Directed by Mansour Sora Wade. Cast: Hubert Kounde, Rokhaya Niang, Gora Seck, Alioune Ndiaye. In a mythical pre-colonial fishing village on the south coast of Senegal, a strange ocean mist hangs over the waters for weeks and the local fishermen fear to go out to sea. One son of a wise elder decides to take his boat onto the waters and returns when the mist lifts with a full catch. He has become a hero, and has won the heart of the prettiest girl in the village, but has also won the envy of his best friend, who also covets the girl. Based on the book: 'Le prix du pardon' / by Mbissane Ngom.

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