UC Berkeley Library

African American Studies

4 Little Girls

Producer/director, Spike Lee. The Birmingham Campaign was launched in 1963. Martin Luther King Jr. and other activists were soon jailed... but it was the participation of the children that advanced the momentum of the Birmingham movement. They marched alongside the adults and were taken to jail with them as well. The 16th St. Baptist Church was close to the downtown area, it was an ideal location to hold rallies and meetings. On Sunday morning, Sept.

761st, The Story of the Black Panther Tank Battalion

The 761st Tank Battalion, the first unit to enlist African-American soldiers to operate armored vehicles was activated on April 1, 1942, at Camp Claiborne, Louisiana and deployed to Europe, landing at Omaha Beach in France on October 10, 1944. Over the course of 183 days of continuous fighting (including action in the Battle of the Bulge) the "Black Panthers" became the first African-American armored unit to enter combat. With the motto "Come Out Fighting!" they faced racism at home and death overseas in a war for many freedoms they did not enjoy in America. Directed by Pete Chatmon. 200-?

A Day to Remember: August 28,1963.

Focuses on the civil rights demonstration in Washington, D.C. led by Martin Luther King. 29 min. [preservation copy];

A Great Day in Harlem

Commentators: Art Kane, Robert Benton, Gerry Mulligan, Bud Freeman, Mike Lipskin, Nat Hentoff, Milt Hinton, Soville Browne, Eddie Locke, Horace Silver, Art Farmer, Robert Altschuler, Art Blakey, Mona Hinton, Steve Frankfurt, Dizzy Gillespie, Sonny Rollins, Marian McPartland, Horace Silver, Sonny Rollins, Hank Jones, Max Kaminsky, Buck Clayton. A documentary about a photograph taken in 1958 by Art Kane of the jazz greats of the period. Includes home movie footage of that day of the musicians arriving and greeting each other the morning of the shoot.

A People's Temple Meeting with Jim Jones.

Features Jim Jones presiding over a meeting, presumably in Berkeley. Members offer testimony and songs in praise of Jim Jones and the Lord. Rare black and white footage of unknown origin and date. 30 min.

A Place of Rage.

Features interviews with Angela Davis, June Jordan, and Alice Walker. Within the context of the civil rights, Black power and feminist movements, the trio reassess how women such as Rosa Parks and Fannie Lou Hamer revolutionized American society. Angela Davis talks about her involvement with the Black Panthers and the communist party. Also included insights from filmmaker Trinh T. Minh-ha . 1991. 52 min.

A Portrait of Jason.

"Filmed in one wild night at New York's Chelsea Hotel, Shirley Clarke's explosive Portrait of Jason is a landmark of nonfiction film, the combination of a visionary director, a complex and enigmatic subject, and a moment of new cinematic and social possibilities. Jason Holliday is an unapologetically gay cabaret performer with charisma to spare, a knack for drama, and a life that's provided him with plenty of stories to tell about racism, homophobia, parental abuse, show business, drugs, sex, prostitution, the law, and whatever else he can think of while the cameras are rolling.

A Question of Color.

Examines the issue of color consciousness within the black community. This film explores a caste system based on how closely skin color, hair texture and facial features conform to a European ideal. A variety of African Americans give their experiences and attitudes towards the questions of color. 58 min.
web web sites: Description from California Newsreel catalogFull-text review from: ABC-CLIO Video Rating Guide for Libraries

A Question of Racial Profiling.

The issue of racial profiling of minorities by police is highly-charged with legal, political, ethical and social implications. This report examines the issue from the points of view of ordinary black Americans, the police and social scientists. Originally broadcast as segments of NBC Dateline in 2004. 40 min.

A Son of Africa.

A docudrama based on the book, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of Oloudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vaasa the African, which was the first influential slave autobiography. When it was published in 1789, it fueled a growing anti-slavery movement in the U.S. and England. This production employs dramatic reconstruction, archival material and interviews with scholars. Equiano's narrative begins in the West African village where he was kidnapped into slavery in 1756. He was shipped to a Virginia plantation and then later sold again to a British naval officer.

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