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African American History 1950 to 1970 & Civil Rights Movement

[Parks, Rosa] Commentary of a Black Southern Busrider

[Sound recording] Rosa Parks discusses her refusal to give up her seat to a white man and the resulting bus-boycott in Montgomery, Alabama. KPFA broadcast, December 20, 1962. 16 min.

[Parks, Rosa] Mighty Times: The Legacy of Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks' simple act of defiance on Dec. 1, 1955, against racial segregation on city buses inspired the African American community of Montgomery, Alabama, to unite against the segregationists who ran City Hall. Over the course of a year, the Montgomery Bus Boycott would test the endurance of the peaceful protestors, overturn an unjust law and create a legacy of mighty times that continue to inspire those who work for freedom and justice today. A project of the Southern Poverty Law Center. Producers, Robert Hudson; director Bobby Huston. 2002. 40 min.

[Parks, Rosa] Rosa Parks Memorial Service.

Julian Bond, Sam Brownback, Johnnie Carr, John Conyers, Cain Hope Felder, Ernest Green, Dorothy I. Height, Gwen Ifill, Edward M. Kennedy, Eleanor Holmes Norton, Cicely Tyson, Melvin Watt, Oprah Winfrey. Televised coverage of the memorial service for civil rights legend Rosa Parks. Participants pay tribute to Ms. Parks as a catalyst of the civil rights movement, her legacy as a voice for the black community, and her service to the nation, in passionate speeches and with music. October 31, 2005. 176 min.

[Parks, Rosa] Rosa Parks.

Program sponsored by the Afro-American Studies Dept. of U.C. Berkeley, honoring Rosa Parks and Septima Clark who were civil rights activists in Montgomery Alabama. 75 min. :1-2

[Powell, Adam Clayton] Adam Clayton Powell.

A look at the most influential and flamboyant civil rights leader in America from the 1930s through the 1950s. From his emergence as a pastor of Harlem's Abyssinian Baptist Church, to his riotous political climb and eventual ruin. He had an illustrious but controversial career. He had multiple marriages, taunted the white establishment, his desegregation of Congress, and his shameful smearing of Martin Luther King Jr. Narrated by Julian Bond. Directed by Richard Kilberg 1989. 53 min.

[Powell, Adam Clayton] Adam Clayton Powell: An Autobiographical Documentary.

Documents the life of Adam Clayton Powell, congressman and pastor of the largest Black congregation in the country. Traces Powell's efforts to eliminate oppression and injustice in America. 58 min.
web web sites: Filmakers Library catalog description

[Randolph, A. Philip] A. Philip Randolph: For Jobs & Freedom.

Biography of the African American labor leader, journalist, and civil rights activist, A. Philip Randolph. Randolph won the first national labor agreement for a black union, The Sleeping Car porters. His threat of a protest march on Washington forced President Roosevelt to ban segregation in the federal government and defense industries at the onset of WWII and again he forced Truman to integrate the military.

[Rustin, Bayard] Brother Outsider: The Life of Bayard Rustin

One of the first "freedom riders," an adviser to Dr. Martin Luther King and A. Philip Randolph, organizer of the March on Washington, intelligent, gregarious and charismatic, Bayard Rustin was denied his place in the limelight for one reason -- he was also gay. This is a film biography of his life. Produced and directed by Nancy Kates, Bennett Singer. 2002. 84 min. ; ALA Video Round Table Notable Video for Adults

[Smith, Eugenia] Miss Smith of Georgia

Portrait of the Georgia author and civil rights activist Lillian Eugenia Smith who was the first prominent white southerner to denounce racial segregation openly and to work actively against it. This program includes extensive interviews with the author as well as brief appearances by author Carson McCullers and actress Ruby Dee. Originally broadcast as a television program in 1962. 30 min.

[Till, Emmett] The Murder of Emmett Till

The shameful, sadistic murder of 14-year-old Emmett Till, a black boy who whistled at a white woman in a Mississippi grocery store in 1955, was a powerful catalyst for the civil rights movement. Although Till's killers were apprehended, they were quickly acquitted by an all-white, all-male jury and proceeded to sell their story to a journalist, providing grisly details of the murder. Three months after Till's body was recovered, the Montgomery Bus Boycott began. Produced and directed by Stanley Nelson. Dist.: PBS. 2003. 60 min.

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