UC Berkeley Library

Chile

11 de Septiember, 1973: El Ultimo Combate de Salvador Allende

Through archival footage and commentary by military and government officials presents the last 24 hours of the government of Allende and the first days after the coup d'etat in Chile. (Companion text: Kalfon, Pierre. Allende: Chile: 1970-1973, cronica Main Stack F3101.A4.K3) 1998 In Spanish. 1998. 57 min. PAL format.

Actas de Marusia.

The chronicle of the repression exercised by an English company over a small Chilean town whose inhabitants are determined to win the minimal human rights due to them as workers and citizens. 1985. 90 min.

Americas in Transition.

Focuses on American military intervention in Nicaragua, Guatemala, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, Chile, and El Salvador. Discusses the roots of dictatorship, its effects on citizens, movements toward majority rule, and communist influences. 1982. 29 min. . Shelved at NRLF.

Battle of Chile: The Struggle of an Unarmed People Part 1: The Bourgeois Insurrection.

The first film in a two-part documentary on the fate of Allende's Popular Unity government filmed throughout Chile from February to September 1973. Part one examines the escalation of rightist opposition following the left's victory in Congressional elections held in March, 1973. Finding that parliamentary democracy would not stop Allende's socialist policies, the right-wing shifted its tactics from the polls to the streets. The film follows months of activity as a variety of increasingly violent tactics are used by the right to weaken the government and provoke a crisis.

Battle of Chile: The Struggle of an Unarmed People Part 2: The Coup.

The second film in a two-part documentary on the fate of Allende's Popular Unity government filmed throughout Chile from February to September 1973. Part two opens with the attempted military coup of June, 1973, which is put down by troops loyal to the government but everyone now realizes the final showdown is only a matter of time. The film shows a left divided over strategy, while the right methodically lays the groundwork for the military seizure of power.

Calle Santa Fe: un amor revolucionario

A documentary about a leftist activist coming back to Chile from exile. Old harrowing memories come back to mind along with fears of finding a submissive Chile that doesn't fit in with the ideals they struggled for, so it triggers mixed feelings and the sensation of a lost battle. Presented at the International Latino Film Festival held in the San Francisco Bay Area. Directed by Carmen Castillo. 2007. 167 min.

Canto a lo poeta (Poet Song)

This documentary explores the roots and the social significance of the oral tradition known as Canto a lo Poeta as an expression of Chilean identity. Directed by Maria Jose Calderon. c2008. 70 min.

Chile, Obstinate Memory</a>

The director returns to Chile and visits with Chileans who experienced the coup first-hand (some of whom are seen in The Battle of Chile from 25 years ago). Survivors reminisce as they watch that film, recognizing lost comrades and recalling their courage, gaiety and love of life. Those who were not killed during the coup itself were crowded into the National Stadium in Santiago, where many were tortured, disappeared, and never seen again. Survivors talk about the terror that characterized the Pinochet regime until the dictator was finally obliged to relinquish power.

Chile: Defeat of a Dictator (Force More Powerful: A Century of Nonviolent Conflict)

General Augusto Pinochet seized power in Chile in a 1973 military coup and banned political parties, closed newspapers, and spread fear throughout the country as disappearances, torture and imprisonment became common. In 1983, an economic crisis pushed many Chileans to oppose the dictator for the first time. Copper miners called for a nonviolent national protest day against Pinochet. Mainstream opposition parties re-ermerged after ten years and staged frequent non-violent demonstrations.

Chile: Hasta Cuando?

Expose of Pinochet's regime of terror in Chile, including interviews with people who have been terrorized by the government. Describes how student protestors have been tortured and killed by government police. Directed by David Bradbury. 1985. 56 min ;
Reviews and articles:
Ryan, Susan. "Chile: Hasta Cuando? An Interview with David Bradbury." Cineaste, vol. 16 no. 1-2. 1987-1988. pp: 76-77.

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