UC Berkeley Library

Blacking Up: Hip-hop's Remix of Race and Identity

This documentary examines the popularity of hip-hop among America's white youth and asks whether white identification is rooted in admiration and a desire to transcend race or if it is merely a new chapter in the long continuum of stereotyping, mimicry and cultural appropriation. Does it reflect a new face of racial understanding in white America or does it reinforce an ugly history? Against the unique backdrop of american popular music, the film explores racial identity in the United States. The film draws parallels between the white hip-hop fan and previous incarnations of white appropriation from blackface performer Al Jolson to mainstream artists like Elvis Presley, the Rolling Stones and Eminem. It interweaves portraits of white hip-hop artists and fans with insightful commentary by African American cultural critics. 2010 57 min.
web web sites: Description from California Newsreel catalog