UC Berkeley Library

Aime Cesaire: A Voice for History.

web web sites:California Newsreel catalog description The Vigilant Island. Part 1 of a 3 part series on the Martinique author, Aime Cesaire, introduces Cesaire, his wife Suzanne who founded in 1939 the seminal literary review, Tropiques, a journal which influenced Caribbean intellectuals and spawned the Negritude Literary Movement. After WWII, Cesaire served as mayor of Fort-de-France and Martinique's representative in the French National Assembly during the crucial years of decolonization. He discusses the difficulty of balancing the life of a poet with that of a practical politician for over 50 years. 1994. 54 min. ; Where the Edges of Conquest Meet. Part 2 or this 3 part series moves to Paris in the 1930s where Cesaire, Leopold Senghor, first president of Senegal, and the French Guyanese poet, Leon Damas developed the concept of Negritude, a world wide revindication of African values. After WWII the Negritude movement centered around a French publishing house, Presence Africaine, which attracted the support of progressive French intellectuals including PabloPicasso, Albert Camus and Jean Paul Sartre. 1994. 56min. ; The Strength to Face Tomorrow.In Part 3 of this 3 part series Cesaire responds to the disappointments of the post-colonial world and expresses his hopes for the future. In the 1960s hisplays were among the first to warn of the dangers of neo-colonialism. French anthropoligist Edgar Morin, biographer Roger Toumson, novelist Maryse Conde and American writer Maya Angelou and others testify to Cesaire's central role as a "founding ancestor" for the current flowering of African Diaspora literature. 1994. 50 min. ;