UC Berkeley Library

African American Soldiers & Japanese Internment During WWII

Contents: Challenge to democracy / U.S. Office of War Information, Domestic Branch, Bureau of Motion Pictures (1944, 17 min.) -- Close harmony / sponsored by General Motors (1942, 11 min.) -- Farmer Henry Browne / U.S. Dept of Agriculture (1942, 11 min.) -- Japanese relocation / U.S. Office of War Information, Domestic Branch, Bureau of Motion Pictures (1943, 9 min.) -- Negro colleges in wartime / U.S. Office of War Information, Domestic Branch, Bureau of Motion Pictures (1943, 9 min.).
Challenge to democracy: The Internment of Japanese-Americans during World War II is here explained according to the Government's point of view. Close harmony: Attempts to show the need for good labor/management relations in the U.S. arms industry, resorting to the "step 'n fetch it" stereotype of Black Americans. Farmer Henry Browne: Shows how a black Georgian farmer does his part for the war, with his farm, his family and the service of his Tuskegee fighter pilot eldest son. Japanese relocation: A propaganda film designed to show the co-operation and satisfaction of the Japanese American internees in terms of being relocated, re-employed, re-educated and interned. Negro colleges in wartime: An exposition of the teaching and training of Black Americans for war, science, industry, agriculture, husbandry, meteorology, medicine, engineering and technical trades at black colleges. 57 min.