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SEPTEMBER

EXHIBITION: SUSTAINING GRANDEUR

Through September 14, 2018
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday
The Bancroft Library Gallery

Marking the 100th anniversary of the founding of the Save the Redwoods League, Sustaining Grandeur is a collaborative exhibition between The Bancroft Library and the League. The exhibition explores the organization's first century protecting California’s redwood forests and the surrounding lands that sustain them, and looks forward to the League’s continued efforts to steward these magnificent landscapes. The exhibition documents the League's acquisitions of land, beginning in 1918, and its partnerships and negotiations with local, state, and federal governments as well as the timber industry—work that resulted in the creation of some of California’s unique and most treasured parks. The exhibition also showcases the League’s science-based initiatives, which deepen appreciation of the redwood ecosystem and provide insight into how the League will continue to protect and care for these magical places in the future. The materials presented include founding documents, photographs, archival footage, campaign material, correspondence, and artifacts illustrating important moments from the League’s and redwoods' history.

EXHIBITION: BEARING LIGHT: BERKELEY AT 150

Through February 1, 2019
Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library
Bancroft Corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

This exhibition celebrates the University of California's sesquicentennial anniversary with photographs, correspondence, publications, and other documentation drawn from the University Archives and The Bancroft Library collections. It features an array of golden bears, including Oski, and explores the illustrious history of UC Berkeley.

EXHIBITION: FIAT YUKS: CAL STUDENT HUMOR, THEN AND NOW

Through May 2019
Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library
Rowell Cases, 2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

Let there be laughter! This exhibition features Cal students' cartoons, jokes, and satire throughout the years selected from their humor magazines and other publications.

ROUNDTABLE:  A WISE COUNSELOR AND FAITHFUL SERVANT: THE LIFE OF REGENT ANDREW SMITH HALLIDIE

September 20, 2018
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Taryn Edwards, Librarian, Historian, and Strategic Partnerships Manager, Mechanics’ Institute of San Francisco

In honor of the 150th anniversary of the founding of the University of California, Regent Andrew Smith Hallidie’s biographer, Taryn Edwards, will give a talk about his life. Considered the father of San Francisco's cable car, Hallidie arrived in California during the Gold Rush and quickly rose to meet the challenges of the frontier using his gumption and his father's patented wire rope to build bridges, ore transportation systems, and a business empire in the West. In addition to being a leader of the state's industrial endeavors, he was a champion of the San Francisco Bay Area's libraries and educational institutions. Hallidie was named an ex officio regent of the University of California in 1868 and was later appointed a regent in his own right, carefully serving until his death in 1900.

 


 

OCTOBER

ROUNDTABLE:   EDUCATION AS THE PROJECT OF FREEDOM: A STUDY OF THE BERKELEY EXPERIMENTAL SCHOOLS PROJECT, 1968-76

October 18, 2018
12:00 PM
O'Neill Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Joanne Tien, doctoral candidate, Education, UC Berkeley

Educators and activists have long debated the relationship between constructivist pedagogical approaches — which emphasize the autonomous, self-directed construction of knowledge from a learner's experience — and the cultivation of explicit political values that challenge systems of oppression. Joanne Tien will discuss her research on archival material at The Bancroft Library and how teachers and students in the Berkeley Experimental Schools Project (BESP) navigated this ideological tension. A public educational program that existed from 1968 to 1976, BESP sought to incorporate the goals of both the Free School and Black Power movements. This historical case study sheds light on the dilemma with particular clarity because the Free Schools represent one of the United States' most radical experiments in constructivist learning, just as the Black Power movement promoted one of its most heightened efforts to challenge systemic oppression.

 


 

NOVEMBER

EXHIBITION:   FACING WEST 1: CAMERA PORTRAITS FROM THE BANCROFT COLLECTION

November 9, 2018 – March 15, 2019
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday
The Bancroft Library Gallery

The first part of a double exhibition celebrating the tenth anniversary of the renewed Bancroft Library and its gallery, Facing West 1 presents a cavalcade of individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. These camera portraits highlight the communities and peoples of Hubert Howe Bancroft's original collecting region, which extended from the Rockies to the Pacific Islands and included Mexico and Central America. They represent photographic techniques, formats, and genres from the Gold Rush era to the present, from the daguerreotype to the digital, from the panoramic to the personal, and from the studio to the street. In them we see ourselves and others through time, light, and lens.

ROUNDTABLE:   PICTURES OF A GONE CITY: TECH AND THE DARK SIDE OF PROSPERITY IN THE SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA

November 15, 2018
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Richard A. Walker, Professor Emeritus, Geography, UC Berkeley, and Director, Living New Deal Project

The San Francisco Bay Area is currently the jewel in the crown of capitalism — the tech capital of the world and a gusher of wealth from the Silicon Valley Gold Rush. It has been generating jobs, spawning new innovation, and spreading ideas that are changing lives everywhere. It boasts of being the "Left Coast," the "Greenest City," and the best place for workers in the U.S. So what could be wrong? It may seem that the Bay Area has the best of it in Trump's America, but there is a dark side of success: overheated bubbles and spectacular crashes; exploding inequality and millions of underpaid workers; a boiling housing crisis, mass displacement, and severe environmental damage; a delusional tech elite; and complicity with the worst in American politics.