UC Berkeley Library

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JANUARY

EXHIBITION: THE GIFT TO SING: HIGHLIGHTS OF THE LEON F. LITWACK & THE BANCROFT LIBRARY AFRICAN AMERICAN COLLECTIONS

Through February 17, 2017
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday

The Bancroft Library Gallery

For decades professor emeritus of history Leon F. Litwack has been accumulating what is arguably the world's finest private collection of books on African American history and culture. This exhibition displays highlights of the collection that will be coming to The Bancroft Library as a bequest. The Litwack collection is particularly noteworthy for its Harlem Renaissance first editions in strikingly illustrated dust jackets. The exhibition includes books with distinguished provenance such as a copy of Frederick Douglass's Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave with an inscription by the famous abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison. Complementing the Litwack books are treasures from Bancroft's significant African American holdings, including the first book by an African American, Phyllis Wheatley's Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in 1773.

 

EXHIBITION:  GUERRA CIVIL @ 80

Through July 1, 2017
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Monday - Friday
2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

 


 

FEBRUARY

ROUNDTABLE:  VIEWS OF THE WOMEN'S LIBERATION AND FEMINIST MOVEMENTS OF THE 1970S AND 1980S: SELECTIONS FROM THE CATHY CADE PHOTOGRAPH ARCHIVE

February 16th
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Led by Cathy Cade, documentary photographer

Cathy Cade was introduced to the power of documentary photography as she participated in the Southern Freedom Movement of the 1960s. In the years that followed, she took an array of images that depict the women’s liberation movement, union women, tradeswomen, lesbian feminism, lesbian mothering, lesbians of color, LGBT freedom days, fat activism, and the disability rights movement. Cade will speak of her personal experiences with social justice causes and the connections between these movements and communities. She will feature highlights drawn from her extensive photograph archive acquired by The Bancroft Library over the past several years.

 


 

MARCH

ROUNDTABLE: THE SAIL BEFORE THE TRAIL OR HAVE WE MISSED THE BOAT?

March 16th
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Led by Fred E. Woods, Professor of Latter-day Saint Church History and Mormon Doctrine, Brigham Young University

This presentation tells the captivating story of Mormon maritime immigration in the nineteenth century. It is based on hundreds of first-person immigrant accounts collected and dissected over the past two decades and reveals the superior modus operandi used by the Latter-day Saints to bring European converts to America.

 

LECTURE: NEW RESEARCH IN ORAL HISTORY: EXPLORING THE AFRICAN AMERICAN EXPERIENCE IN THE 19TH & 20TH CENTURIES THROUGH ORAL HISTORY

March 20th
12:00 PM
Oral History Center Conference Room, The Bancroft Library, Room 267

Led by Shirley Ann Wilson Moore, Professor Emerita of History, California State University, Sacramento

Professor Moore, an alumna of UC Berkeley, is the author of numerous works on African American history in the West, including To Place Our Deeds: The African American Community in Richmond, California 1910-1963, and most recently Sweet Freedom's Plains: African Americans on the Overland Trails 1841-1869. In this ongoing series, "New Research in Oral History," Dr. Moore will discuss her use of oral history in these two books, as well as its overall importance in documenting the African American experience in California and the West. Please check the Oral History Center's website for additional events in Spring 2017.

 


 

APRIL

LECTURE: ANTINOUPOLIS, YESTERDAY & TODAY

April 5th
5:00-7:00 PM
The Morrison Library, Doe Library

Led by Professor Rosario Pintaudi, Università degli Studi di Messina, Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana, Director, Excavations of the Istituto Papirologico "G. Vitelli" (Università degli Studi di Firenze) at Antinoupolis

In this illustrated lecture Professor Pintaudi will discuss the history and current excavations of Antinoupolis, the magnificent city (later a provincial capital) that Emperor Hadrian founded in Middle Egypt near the site at which his favorite, Antinous, drowned in AD 130. Professor Pintaudi has been excavating at the site for nearly two decades.

 

EXHIBITION: TEACHERS AT THE CENTER: THE STORY OF THE NATIONAL WRITING PROJECT

April 17 - September 1, 2017
Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library
Rowell Cases, 2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

The National Writing Project is a professional development network for teachers of writing at all levels, from early childhood to university. Drawing from the newly available National Writing Project records and other Bancroft Library collections, this exhibition explores the history of the organization from its origins within the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley to its present status as a nationwide network.

 

ROUNDTABLE: MARKING TIME: GWENDOLYN BROOKS AND THE MUNDANE WORLD

April 20th
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Led by Amani Morrison, Bancroft Library Study Award recipient and doctoral candidate in African Diaspora Studies, UC Berkeley

Poet, novelist, and Pulitzer Prize winner Gwendolyn Brooks is heralded for her deftness in capturing the everydayness of black people, especially black Chicagoans, in her writing. Works like A Street in Bronzeville (1945) and Maud Martha (1953) portray the mundane aspirations and realities of their characters. Brooks's papers in The Bancroft Library show that the author was very much attuned to the commonplace and ordinary in her own life as well. This talk looks at some of Brooks's artifacts and writings, and suggests how the author's own practices of marking time and experiences might help us to creatively rethink our own.

 

EXHIBITION: NEW FAVORITES: COLLECTING IN THE BANCROFT TRADITION

April 21 - September 1, 2017
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday
The Bancroft Library Gallery

For the first time in many years The Bancroft Library presents an exhibition of recent additions to its major collections. The exhibition also includes recently rediscovered masterpieces carefully collected in years past. Gold-Rush-era memoirs and advertisements, early editions of William Langland and Jane Austen, "branded" books from 18th c. Mexico, and David Johnson's photographs of the African American community in San Francisco after World War II are but a few of the items featured. The exhibition showcases the Bancroft curators and their distinctive collecting practices, which expand the remarkable vision of library founder Hubert Howe Bancroft—documenting California as it was happening and building a library for the American West that would rival its older European antecedents.

 

EVENT: CAL DAY 2017

April 22nd
9:00 AM - 4:00 PM
UC Berkeley Campus

The Bancroft Library Gallery will be open for visitors on Cal Day from 10am to 4pm.

 


 

MAY

ROUNDTABLE: NATIVE AMERICAN COLLECTIONS AT THE BANCROFT LIBRARY (please note program change!)

May 18th
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Led by Lee Anne Titangos, Bancroft Library's Information and Instruction Specialist, UC Berkeley

Lee Anne Titangos will share highlights of The Bancroft Library’s Native American collections, spanning from original research material gathered by Hubert Howe Bancroft himself to contemporary photographic documentation of cultural heritage revitalization of local indigenous groups. She also will discuss how these amazing collections are being used by the campus community and beyond.