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JANUARY

EXHIBITION: FACING WEST 1: CAMERA PORTRAITS FROM THE BANCROFT COLLECTION

Through March 15th
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday
The Bancroft Library Gallery

The first part of a double exhibition continues! Facing West 1 presents a cavalcade of individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. Be sure to return to the gallery in April for the concluding half of this fascinating exploration of portraiture and the Bancroft collections.

 

EXHIBITION: FIAT YUKS: CAL STUDENT HUMOR, THEN AND NOW

Through May 31st
Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library
Rowell Cases, 2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

Let there be laughter! This exhibition features Cal students' cartoons, jokes, and satire throughout the years selected from their humor magazines and other publications.

 


 

FEBRUARY

ROUNDTABLE:  MIGRANTS IN THE MAKING: INVISIBLE AGRICULTURAL CHILD LABOR AND THE LIMITS OF CITIZENSHIP, 1938-1965

February 21st
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez, Ph.D. candidate, History, Columbia University, and Visiting Dissertation Research Scholar, UC Berkeley Latinx Research Center

Farm work is the most hazardous industry for young workers. Yet despite the implementation of a national child labor ban in 1938, Latinx children continue to toil in fields nationwide with an estimated 200,000 to 500,000 agricultural child laborers employed each year. Ivón Padilla-Rodríguez identifies the child labor ban’s agricultural exemption as the reason for this disjuncture. Between 1938 and 1965, the legal exemption made it possible for growers and their allies to circumvent child labor protections and compulsory school attendance laws and as a result, migrant Mexican and Mexican American children from the Southwest lost rights crucial to childhood and the exercise of citizenship.

 


 

MARCH

ROUNDTABLE: SACRED TIME ON THE FRONTIER: SABBATH-KEEPING AMONGST PROTESTANTS AND JEWS IN CALIFORNIA, 1848-1920

March 21st
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Michel Sunhae Lee, Ph.D. candidate, Religious Studies, University of Texas

How did the white Protestant tradition of Sunday-keeping take root in a religiously and racially diverse frontier society—if at all? This presentation will explore the contestations between majority first day-keepers and minority voices during the Gold Rush and early decades of California statehood, giving special attention to Jews, Seventh-day Adventists, and the religiously unaffiliated. It draws from sources in the Magnes Collection of Jewish Art and Life, diaries, and institutional records held at The Bancroft Library to offer a glimpse into how sacred time was negotiated at a moment in American history.

 


 

APRIL

EXHIBITION: FACING WEST 2: CAMERA PORTRAITS FROM THE BANCROFT COLLECTION

April 1 - July 12
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday
The Bancroft Library Gallery

The final part of a double exhibition, Facing West 2 continues the celebration of the individuals who made, and continue to make, California and the American West. These camera portraits highlight the communities and peoples of Hubert Howe Bancroft's original collecting region, which extended from the Rockies to the Pacific Islands and included Mexico and Central America. They represent photographic techniques, formats, and genres from the Gold Rush era to the present, from the daguerreotype to the digital, from the panoramic to the personal, and from the studio to the street. In them we see ourselves and others through time, light, and lens.

 

LECTURE: A GREEK OFFICER AND AN EGYPTIAN LADY: ETHNIC DIVERSITY IN A WEALTHY HOUSEHOLD IN HELLENISTIC EGYPT

April 16th
5:30-8:00 PM
Morrison Library

Presented by Katelijn Vandorpe, Professor of Ancient Greek, KU Leuven

When Alexander the Great's general Ptolemy established a new dynasty of pharaohs, many Greeks emigrated to the land of the Nile. In this lecture, Professor Vandorpe will outline the policies of the Ptolemaic kings and queens in this early multicultural society, and focus on the eventful life of a family that is richly documented by a bilingual papyrus archive. This bicultural family, which lived in the southern part of the country, consisted of a Greek officer, his son from his first marriage, his Egyptian wife, and their five daughters.

 

EVENT: CAL DAY

April 13th
10:00-4:00 PM
UC Berkeley Campus

The Bancroft Library Gallery will be open for visitors on Cal Day from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

 

ROUNDTABLE: CHEROKEES AND CHOCTAWS AMONG THE MIWOK AND YOKUTS: LEGACIES OF CULTURAL BLENDING AND INTERTRIBAL RELATIONS IN NINETEENTH-CENTURY CALIFORNIA

April 18th
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Andrew Shaler, Ph.D. candidate, History, UC Riverside

The California Gold Rush is remembered for the thousands of immigrants who traversed continents and oceans for a chance to gain quick wealth. Lost in these narratives are the rich histories of the Native American emigrants who made the same journey to California's Gold Country beginning in 1849. In many ways these indigenous emigrants—Cherokees, Choctaws, Wyandots, among others—straddled the spheres of "settler" and "indigenous" societies, often maintaining close relations with both. Andrew Shaler will discuss the legacies of these Native emigrants, who often acted as intermediaries between tribal and settler communities at a time when California Indian peoples faced an increasingly violent white settler population.
 


 

MAY

EXHIBITION: IT'S THE WEST!

May 1 - July 2019
Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library
Bancroft Corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

For more than a century The Bancroft Library has collected the material record of the West. Its limitless possibilities continue to draw people to this region, and to the Bancroft collections that preserve the history of its communities. In April 2018, the University Library embarked on a $8 million initiative to ensure the future of Bancroft's oldest and most heavily used collection—Western Americana. This exhibition pairs images from the Western Americana collection with lyrics by 2012 Western Music Association Hall of Famer Dave Stamey. "It's the West" has become the virtual theme song of the Western Americana campaign. The text appears here courtesy of Dave Stamey, who is also a Friend of The Bancroft Library.

 

ROUNDTABLE: "LOANS FOR THE LITTLE FELLOW": CREDIT, CRISIS, AND RECOVERY IN THE GREAT DEPRESSION

May 16th
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Sarah Quincy, Ph.D. candidate, Economics, UC Davis

Both lauded as "the great bank of the West" and reviled as a "huge financial octopus," the Bank of America introduced several modern banking practices during the Great Depression. Quantitative and qualitative evidence gathered from archives, including The Bancroft Library, indicates that the Bank of America's unusual emphasis on lending to underserved populations helped the communities in which it operated to thrive during the 1930s. Sarah Quincy will discuss her research of this unusual bank's impact on the state's economy during the 1920s and 1930s, and how its services played an integral role in California's development during the worst financial crisis in the history of the United States.