UC Berkeley Library

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AUGUST

EXHIBITION: NEW FAVORITES: COLLECTING IN THE BANCROFT TRADITION

Through September 1, 2017
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday
The Bancroft Library Gallery

The Bancroft Library presents an exhibition of recent additions to its major collections and recently rediscovered masterpieces carefully collected in years past. Gold Rush-era memoirs, "branded" books from 18th-c. Mexico, and David Johnson’s photographs of the African American community in San Francisco after World War II are but a few of the items featured. The exhibition showcases the Bancroft curators and their distinctive collecting practices, which expand the remarkable vision of library founder Hubert Howe Bancroft—documenting California as it was happening and building a library for the American West that would rival its older European antecedents.

 

EXHIBITION: TEACHERS AT THE CENTER: THE STORY OF THE NATIONAL WRITING PROJECT

Through September 30, 2017
Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library
Rowell Cases, 2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

The National Writing Project is a professional development network for teachers of writing at all levels, from early childhood to university. Drawing from the newly available National Writing Project records and other Bancroft Library collections, this exhibition explores the history of the organization from its origins within the Graduate School of Education at UC Berkeley to its present status as a nationwide network.

 

EXHIBITION:  THE SUMMER OF LOVE

Through Februrary 23, 2018
8:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Monday - Friday
2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

Marking a 50th anniversary, Bancroft's rare and unique collections documenting the 1967 "Summer of Love" are on exhibit in the corridor cases. Presented are images from the Bay Area alternative press, psychedelic rock posters and mailers, documentary photographs of the Haight-Ashbury scene and major rock concerts, and material from the personal papers of author Joan Didion and poet Michael McClure.

 


 

SEPTEMBER

ROUNDTABLE:  IS THE CIVIL RIGHTS STRUGGLE OF THE 1960S STILL RELEVANT TODAY?

September 21st
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Carol Ruth Silver, speaker, author, consultant, & retired attorney

In 1961 Carol Ruth Silver was arrested during her activism as a Freedom Rider, and secretly documented her experiences on scraps of paper while jailed in Mississippi. She turned these scraps into a manuscript, Freedom Rider Diary: Smuggled Notes from Parchman Prison, which was published by the University Press of Mississippi in 2014. Her manuscript collection and book are now housed in The Bancroft Library. Ms. Silver will share her civil-rights-era experiences and discuss nonviolence and activism today.

 


 

OCTOBER

LECTURE: NEW RESEARCH IN ORAL HISTORY: ORAL HISTORY AND HUMAN RIGHTS IN SOUTH AMERICA

October 2nd
12:00 PM
Oral History Center Conference Room, The Bancroft Library, Room 267

Presented by Jacqueline Adams, Senior Researcher, Institute for the Study of Social Issues, UC Berkeley

Dr. Adams is an award-winning sociologist conducting research on women living in Chilean shantytowns, and their experiences of poverty, state violence, work, and participation in a transnational human rights movement. Dr. Adams will focus on the role of oral history in her current research on the use of visual methods in human rights violations research, on enforced disappearance, and on low-income Latino/as and the difficulties that they face gaining access to state programs and facilities.

 

EXHIBITION: ¡VIVA LA FIESTA! MEXICAN TRADITIONS OF CELEBRATION

October 13, 2017 - February 2018
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, Monday - Friday
The Bancroft Library Gallery

¡Viva la Fiesta! explores the cycle of traditional religious and patriotic celebrations that have for centuries marked the Mexican calendar. The exhibition draws on unique historical representations of the fiestas and examines their relationship to communal identities, national politics, religious practices, and indigenous customs. These original materials, which are preserved in the Bancroft Latin Americana Collection and date from the sixteenth century to the present, include early baptismal records in Spanish and Nahuatl, images of Christmas pastorelas and posadas, sermons honoring local patron saints, and accounts of Marian devotions, such as the annual festival of Our Lady of Guadalupe.

 

EXHIBITION: FIAT YUKS: CAL STUDENT HUMOR, THEN AND NOW

October 13, 2017 - June 3, 2018
Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library
Rowell Cases, 2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library

Let there be laughter! This exhibition features Cal students' cartoons, jokes, and satire throughout the years selected from their humor magazines and other publications.

 

LECTURE: NEW RESEARCH IN ORAL HISTORY: MAKING SLOW FOOD FAST CUISINE

October 16th
12:00 PM
Oral History Center Conference Room, The Bancroft Library, Room 267

Presented by Victor Geraci, Independent Scholar

Dr. Geraci, formerly the associate director of the Oral History Center, returns to present the findings of his new book. Utilizing multidisciplinary literature and oral
histories, Dr. Geraci follows the development of industrial agriculture in California and its influence on both regional and national eating habits. Early California politicians and entrepreneurs envisioned agriculture as a solution to the food needs of the expanding industrial nation. Problems arose as mid-twentieth-century social activists battled the unresponsiveness of government agencies to corporate greed, food safety, and environmental sustainability.

 

ROUNDTABLE:  CITY OF WHITE GOLD, SAN FRANCISCO IN THE GILDED AGE: BRINGING ARCHIVAL IMAGES TO LIFE THROUGH FILM

October 19th
12:00 PM
O’Neill Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Geordie Lynch, filmmaker

Filmmaker Geordie Lynch will discuss his film-in-progress, City of White Gold, and how the discovery of silver in 1859 transformed San Francisco from a backwater boomtown into a world-class metropolis. It is a tale of the epic struggle for wealth and power in the West. The director will also detail the fine points of enriching a historical documentary with stunning and exciting visual imagery.

 

HOMECOMING WEEKEND: ¡VIVA LA FIESTA! 

October 21st
10:00 AM - 4:00 PM
The Bancroft Library Gallery

Join us in the Gallery on the Saturday of Homecoming Weekend to enjoy a chat with Bancroft staff members and informal gallery talks about the current exhibition.

 


 

NOVEMBER

ROUNDTABLE: NATIVE CLAIMS ACROSS NATIONS: INDIGENOUS LAND OWNERSHIP IN MEXICAN AND U.S. CALIFORNIA, 1840-1860

November 16th
12:00 PM
Lewis-Latimer Room, The Faculty Club

Presented by Julia Lewandoski, doctoral candidate, History, UC Berkeley

The vast majority of indigenous Californians never received land promised to them after Mexico secularized California's missions in 1834. Julia Lewandowski will
discuss those who did receive grants in the 1840s. After California became a U.S. state in 1850, these indigenous proprietors had to confirm title to their lands with the U.S. Board of Land Commissioners. Drawing primarily on The Bancroft Library's California land case files, Ms. Lewandoski traces the stories of indigenous individuals, families, and communities who used two settler legal systems to gain and keep land during this chaotic period.