Ethnic Studies

Contact Ethnic Studies Librarians

Doe and Moffitt Libraries Liaison:

Corliss Lee  clee@library.berkeley.edu 
(510) 768-7899

 


 

Ethnic Studies Library:

Chicano Studies: 

Lillian Castillo-Speed  csl@library.berkeley.edu
(510) 642-3947

Native American Studies:

Lillian Castillo-Speed  csl@library.berkeley.edu
(510) 642-3947

Asian American Studies:

Wei Chi Poon  wcpoon@library.berkeley.edu
(510) 642-2220

About the UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Collections

The UC Berkeley Library collects at a research level in the subject of Ethnic Studies, which includes: history, literature, political science, etc. These materials are purchased in virtually all languages of the world and represent the ethnicities of people from all corners of the world.

Ethnic Studies collections are located in multiple campus libraries.  Humanities and social sciences materials are located in the Main (Gardner) Stacks, with additional materials in subject specialty libraries such as the Education/Psychology, Social Welfare, Anthropology, Environmental Design, Media Resources Center, etc.  

The Ethnic Studies Library , with its departmental focus, features an Asian American Studies Collection, the Chicano Studies Collection, and a Native American Studies Collection.

The Bancroft Library, in addition to being the UC Berkeley’s manuscript and archival collections, holds materials relevant to American ethnic groups in California, the Western United States and Mexico; see the Western Americana collection description for details.

Start your research with the UCB Library catalog, OskiCat to find the library locations and call numbers of materials for your research.

See also the subject guide for African American Studies.

Supporting the Library

The Library welcomes gifts in all forms. Many private donors have made contributions toward the acquisition of research materials for the use of Berkeley faculty and students. This support is very important in sustaining the excellence of our collections and services.

Read more about how you can support the UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies Library.

The following types of gifts are available to support the Ethnic Studies collections within the Doe and Moffitt Libraries:

Cash Gifts for Book Purchases
Cash contributions of any amount are welcomed and can be made directly to the Library using the online form. In the Special instructions or designations for this gift section, specify that you are supporting the Ethnic Studies collections.

If you prefer to send a check, make it payable to the UC Regents (indicate which collection you are supporting) and mail it to:

Corliss Lee
302 Moffitt Library
University of California
Berkeley, CA  94720-6000

Donations of Materials
Gifts of books and scholarly materials  have historically represented a significant element in the development of our outstanding research collections.  Contact Corliss Lee about the materials you wish to donate.

Memorial and Honorific Gifts
Contributions given in memory or in honor of a person are welcomed. For a gift of $1,000 or more, a named memorial book fund can be established. A special book plate will be created and placed in each book.

Named Endowment

Endowment funds may be established with a gift of $50,000 or more. These funds provide the library with an annual income in perpetuity and have a lasting impact on maintaining a world class collection in of Ethnic Studies. The University invests its endowments carefully to achieve a healthy rate of return that provides for both current needs and long-term growth. A special book plate will be created and placed in each book.

Campus Library Map

Click on the image below to see a larger interactive version of the campus library map.

UC Berkeley Library campus map

You can also view/download a PDF map of library locations. For library contact information and building addresses, visit our directory.

Purchase Recommendation

Purchase Recommendation

You can suggest items that the Library should consider purchasing. Use the Purchase Recommendation form to submit your suggestion.

Doe Library, North Reading Room

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Doe, Main Stacks, Moffitt Library floorplans

Looking for a location in Doe, Main Stacks or Moffitt?  Try the floorplans, or ask for assistance!

The Research Process

Choose a topic.  

Do a brain dump: Note down what you already know about your topic, including

Fill in the gaps in your knowlege: get background information from encyclopedias or other secondary sources.  Wikipedia can be good here.

Select the best places/ databases to find information on your topicLook under the History Databases tab of this guide for article database suggestions. Or use a catalog like Oskicat or Melvyl to search for books and other resources.

Use nouns from your brain dump as search terms.

Evaluate what you find.  Change search terms to get closer to what you really want.

Refine Your Topic - Using the information you have gathered, determine if your research topic should be narrower or broader. You may need to search basic resources again using your new, focused topics and keywords. 

Take a look this short tutorial on beginning your research for more ideas.

How to Narrow Your Topic

"I'm writing a paper on World War II." 

Often students start their research with a very general topic, even though they may realize the topic is too large to deal with in a 10-15 page paper.  Faculty and librarians tell them, "You have to narrow this down."  But how do you narrow a topic?

Ask yourself--

You can combine these ideas, "What were the major impacts of WWII on women in France, in the decade after the war?"

More ideas in our brief tutorial on topic selection and narrowing. 

Library Workshop: Research 101

Unsure how to start a paper or research project? Think maybe you could stand to brush up ostudent with laptopn search strategies?

If this sounds familiar, Library Workshop: Research 101 has you covered. This interactive tutorial explores six stages of the research process. You can view it from start to finish, or focus on specific sections as needed:

1: Begin Your Research

Starting strategies, from choosing a topic to finding the right keywords.

2: Knowledge Cycle

The publication timeline, scholarly vs. popular sources, and differences in academic disciplines.

3: Finding Books

Search for books and other items in OskiCat, Cal's local library catalog.

4: Finding Articles

Locate and access articles in library research databases.

5: Make Citations

How to cite your sources correctly.

6: Basic Search

Common techniques for constructing searches that yield useful results.

7: Advanced Search

Specialized search strategies for targeting specific topics.

Catalogs

To find books, DVDs, maps, sound recordings, manuscripts, and much more - everything except articles - use a library catalog.

OskiCat = most UC Berkeley libraries

MELVYL = all UC campus libraries, including all UC Berkeley libraries

What's the difference?  more details here

For each item make sure you know the name of the physical library, call number, and whether or not it's checked out, library use only, etc.

Call numbers are on the spine of the book; learn how to read them so you can find what you need on the shelves.

ebrary = ebooks

ebrary is our largest collection of full text ebooks, with 40,000 titles on a wide range of subjects. Find them in the UCB catalog, OskiCat (keyword: ebrary or limit to "Available Online"), or search the ebrary site directly:

Search ebrary

 

Getting started with ebrary

Google Books

Google Books contains millions of scanned books, from libraries and publishers worldwide. You can search the entire text of the books, view previews or "snippets" from books that are still in copyright, and read the full text of out-of-copyright (pre-1923) books.  Want to read the entire text of an in-copyright book?  Use Google Books' Find in a Library link to locate the book in a UC Berkeley library, or search OskiCat to see if UC Berkeley owns the book.

Why use Google Books?

Library catalogs (like OskiCat) don't search inside books; using a library catalog, you can search only information about the book (title, author, Library of Congress subject headings, etc.).  Google Books will let you search inside books, which can be very useful for hard-to-find information.  Try it now:

Google Book Search

Article Databases

Search an article database to find citations (title, author, title of journal, date, page numbers) for articles on a particular topic.  The Library gives you access to over 200 article databases covering different disciplines.

1.  Think about which academic disciplines might write about your topic.  Examples:  literature, film, anthropology, history...

2.  Find the appropriate article database by subject (academic discipline or department).  Look for "Recommended" databases.

Library home > Articles > Article Databases by Subject

Selected Article Databases

The following  is a list of a few databases useful in Ethnic Studies research; see more here .  Also, view the complete list of electronic resources by academic disciplines for other relevant disciplines, such as African American Studies, Literature, History, Sociology, etc.

UC-eLinks - Find Article Text/Location

Once you've searched a database to find articles, you may need to use UC-eLinks orange logo to link to a PDF or html file if the full text is not immediately available. Each database is a bit different, but a good rule of thumb is this: when you see the Uc-eLinks icon click on it to view your article access options, which can range from full text to a call number to an Interlibrary Loan request:

UC e-Links image

For more information, here's a tutorial on using UC-eLinks.

Search Results

Off-campus access to library resources

You can access UCB Library resources from off campus or via your laptop or other mobile device using one of two simple methods:

Proxy Server
After you make a one-time change in your web browser settings, the proxy server will ask you to log in with a CalNet ID or Library PIN when you click on the link to a licensed resource. See the setup instructions, FAQ, and Troubleshooting pages to configure your browser.

VPN (Virtual Private Network)
After you install and run the VPN "client" software on your computer, you can log in with a CalNet ID to establish a secure connection with the campus network.

SMS and QR Codes in OskiCat

You can now text yourself a call number or use a QR code reader to find the location of an item in the UCB Library. Just click on a title in your OskiCat search results, and both options will be displayed on the right.

SMS and QR image

Google Research Tools

Google Scholar is an easy way to do interdisciplinary research, and with some settings changes can become even more useful.  You may need a Google account to use some of these features.

Open Scholar.  Click on scholar preferences [upper right corner]. Under Library Links, enter the word Berkeley.  Choose  UC Berkeley eLinks and Open WorldCat - Library Search and Save your preferences.  UC e-links will now appear in Google Scholar search results.

Do your search in Google Scholar. Look in the green toolbar for the envelope icon, and click it.  New items will be sent to your email account as they are found by Google.

Do a Google Scholar search. Click on the "Cited by" link under a citation and select the "Search within articles citing..." checkbox.

How to Avoid Plagiarism

In order to avoid plagiarism, you must give credit when

Recommendations

 

This content is part of the Understanding Plagiarism tutorial created by the Indiana University School of Education.

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, organize and store your PDFs, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but all are easier than doing it by hand!

  1. Zotero: A free plug-in for the Firefox browser: keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service. Zotero is also available as a stand-alone application that syncs with Chrome and Safari, or as a bookmarklet for mobile browsers.
  2. RefWorks - web-based and free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies, then works with Word to help you format references and a bibliography for your paper. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up.
  3. EndNote: Desktop software for managing your references and formatting bibliographies. You can purchase EndNote from the Cal Student Store

Tip: After creating a bibliography with a citation management tool, it's always good to double check the formatting; sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

Citing Your Sources

The UCB Library Guide to Citing Your Sources discusses why you should cite your sources and links to campus resources about plagiarism.  It also includes links to guides for frequently used citation styles.  Also:

Zotero Tips

If you've never used Zotero before, use the QuickStart Guide to get started.

Change your preferences if you want  Zotero to

To use Zotero to find specific articles in our library's databases, set up the Open URL resolver with this link: http://ucelinks.cdlib.org:8888/sfx_local? 

An in-depth discussion of the relative virtues of Endnote and Zotero,

 

DVDs and Non Print Media

Media Resources Center lists of media for Ethnic Studies

Media Resources Center:  Movies, Race and Ethnicity

How to Cite Media

You can also find non-print media of all types in OskiCat; search by keywords, author, subject, title, etc. and pull down the "Entire Collection" menu to the type of resource you want (maps, films, etc.)

All Media Resources Center materials must be used on-site.

Finding Primary Sources

Primary sources can be found in a variety of library tools:

For specific search strategies, see the Library's Guide to Finding Historical Primary Sources

Learn more about your topic in advance:

Selected Databases for Primary Sources

Other Ethnic Studies Departments in California

African American Studies, UC Irvine

Center for African American Studies Library, UC Los Angeles

Guide to African American Studies, UC San Diego

Asian American Studies, UC Irvine

Asian American Studies Center Reading Room, UC Los Angeles

Guide to Asian American Studies, UC San Diego

The César E. Chávez Center for Interdisciplinary Instruction in Chicana & Chicano Studies, UC Los Angeles

Chicano Studies Research Center, UC Los Angeles

Chicano-Latino Studies, UC Irvine

Coleccion Tloque Nahuaque, UC Santa Barbara

Guide to Hispanic American Studies, UC San Diego

California Ethnic and Multicultural Archives, UC Santa Barbara

Ethnic Studies at the University of Southern California

Ethnic Studies at UC Riverside

Ethnic Studies Publications, UC Los Angeles

Guide to North American Ethnicity and Culture, UC San Diego

Institute of American Cultures, UC Los Angeles

National Association of Ethnic Studies

Resources in Area and Ethnic Studies, New School University

American Indian Studies Center Library, UC Los Angeles

Department of Native American Studies, UC Davis

Guide to Native American Studies, UC San Diego

Ask a Librarian 24/7 Chat


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Research Advisory Service

Research Advisory Service for Cal Undergraduates

Book a 30-minute appointment with a librarian who will help refine and focus research inquiries, identify useful online and print sources, and develop search strategies for humanities and social sciences topics (examples of research topics).

Schedule, view, edit or cancel your appointment online (CalNetID required)

This service is for Cal undergraduates only. Graduate students and faculty should contact the library liaison to their department or program for specialized reference consultations.

Getting Help

Other ways to get help:  in person, by e-mail, etc.

Contact:       Lillian Castillo-Speed  - Head, Ethnic Studies Library                   

               Corliss Lee - Ethnic Studies Librarian, Doe and Moffitt Libraries

Related Subject Guides

Related Course Guides

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