HIST 139: From the Civil Rights Era to the New Gilded Age

Questions? That's my job.

  • Lynn Jones

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  • Office Hours: by appointment
  • Office Location: 212 Doe Library
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About this Guide

Sources and research help for Mark Brilliant's History/American Studies research paper

First, a few basics ...

For off-campus access to library databases, e-books, and e-journals, set up your web browser to use our proxy server.

Get a map of the campus libraries.

Each library has its own hours - click on "Calendar" for each library to view a month at a time.

Access all of our resources through the library website.

Looking for a more detailed, step-by-step introduction to research? Try our interactive online Library Workshop.

Let us know what you think!  After you've used this research guide, please take a moment to give us your comments.

The Bancroft Library

The Bancroft Library is one of the treasures of the campus, and one of the world's great libraries for the history of the Bancroft Library interiorAmerican West.

Some Bancroft materials are available online via Calisphere, which includes primary sources from many California libraries and museums.

Before you go:

1.  Be prepared! Read secondary sources and know something about your topic.

2.  Search OskiCat so you can bring call numbers with you. Use the Entire Collection pull-down menu in OskiCat to limit your search to the Bancroft Library only. (Remember that there are primary sources in many other campus libraries as well.)

3.  Learn about the Bancroft's policies: read about Access (bring a quarter for lockers) and Registration (bring two pieces of ID).  You may want to read about the new camera policy ($10/day, no flash) or about getting photocopies.

Read more

Library FAQs

More questions?  Our FAQs may help. 

All Questions Welcomed!

"There are no dumb questions!" student at reference desk

That's the philosophy of reference librarians, who are here to save you time and trouble. If you get stuck, you can talk to a reference librarian at any campus library

Finding Primary Sources overview

Primary sources can be found in a variety of library tools:

For specific search strategies, see the Library's Guide to Finding Historical Primary Sources

 

Primary Resources

The library has created a guide to searching for primary sources in Oskicat, including the best search terms you can use.

This is a list of a few of the many primary source databases in US History, in addition to Oskicat. more

Searching OskiCat for Primary Sources

Certain words and phrases (part of the Library of Congress Subject Headings classification system) will find primary sources in library catalogs.  You can use these in OskiCat or Melvyl:magnifying glass and computer keyboard

Example searches:

Primary Source Searching - Names

One of the most powerful ways to find primary sources in the Library is to use the names of people.  An essential part of your background reading should be to note down names of people involved in your topics.

Names can be searched in the catalogs [Oskicat and Melvyl] in specialized ways: as authors or as subjects.  Even people you do not consider authors in the conventional sense may be listed as authors, if:

When searching for primary sources, it's a good idea always to search those names as authors, as well as keywords.  Works where the person is listed as an author will always be primary sources.

African American News

Selected African American Newspapers

Flatlands (Oakland, 1966-67) Location:  News/Micro MICROFILM 78777, Bancroft BANC NMP 6764:2:3

The Post (shelved as “Oakland Post,” 1963-67) Location: News/Micro NEWSPRINT-1

The Sacramento Observer (Sacramento, 1962-present) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1 

The Sun-Reporter (San Francisco, 1943-present) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

Los Angeles Tribune (Los Angeles, 1941-1960) Location:  library only has selected issues, mainly from 1947-1952 in News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

The California Eagle (Los Angeles, 1897-1966) Location:  library has 1944-53 in News/Micro NEWSFILM-1, also available from Bancroft

The Peninsula Bulletin (East Palo Alto, 1971-1979) Location:  News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

The California Voice (Oakland, 1920-1998) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1 (separate issues)

Richmond Afro American (Richmond, VA, 1938-68) Location: library has selected issues from these dates, some of which may have to be requested from NRLF, others in News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

The Michigan Chronicle (Detroit, 1936-present) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1 (1943-1974)

Primary Sources: Newspapers

Newspapers on Microfilm

Because of their fragility as they age, newspapers have traditionally been preserved by microfilming them.

Microfilm must be read on microfilm reader/printers.  The Newspaper and Microfilm Room in 40 Doe Library has them.  So does Bancroft Library. Newspaper films are arranged geographically within the News|Micro collection [floorplan.pdf]

Reader/printers allow you to read the films and those in News|Micro allow you to save pages to flash drives in .jpg and .pdf format.

Most newspapers do not have indexes.  How do you find articles by subject? By knowing the approximate date of the event you are studying.  If you don't know the date, you can use the index to a different newspaper as a way to find out.

Newspaper indexes you might want to use:

There are others.  Ask the Newspaper Microfilm staff for help.

US Primary Source Collections

There is a vast amount of archival material in the Berkeley Library in the Bancroft Library and in microform.  Here are some collections to try:

 

  1.  African American microfilm collections 
  2. African Americans in California [online archive]
  3. Collections of the United Farm Workers [microfilm]

 

 

History databases

Three important databases for research in History.

African American databases

Finding Other Databases

Search an article database to find citations (title, author, title of journal, date, page numbers) for articles on a particular topic.  The Library gives you access to over 200 article databases covering different disciplines.

1.  Think about which academic disciplines might write about your topic.  Examples:  literature, film, anthropology, history...

2.  Find the appropriate article database by subject (academic discipline or department).  Look for "Recommended" databases.

Library home > Articles > Article Databases by Subject

3.  You may need databases that cover diffferent types of materials - historical or ethnic newspapers, congressional information, primary sources, etc:

Library home > Electronic Resources > Electronic Resources, Types A-Z >

Find an Article from a Citation

Here's a citation for an article...how do you find the whole article?

Gaultney, J. F. (2010). The Prevalence of Sleep Disorders in College Students: Impact on Academic Performance. Journal of American College Health, 59(2), 91-97

This citation is for an article by J. F. Gaultney, published in 2010 in the Journal of American College Health, a scholarly, peer-reviewed journal. It's part of volume 59, issue 2 of this journal, and was printed on pages 91-97. There are several ways of determining if the article you're looking for is available at Berkeley, in electronic or printed format:

Option 1: Use Google Scholar to locate a citation for the article, and UC-eLinks to retrieve the full text.

Paste or type the citation into Google and pull down the Google Scholar tool. Here's how:

jing thumbnail

Remember to set up off-campus access if you're off-campus. Here's a brief video that shows what to do if you don't see UC-eLinks in your search results.

Note: Google Scholar does not cover all publishers, and many journals indexed by Google Scholar have partial coverage only (some years/volumes missing). Also, not all articles found through Google Scholar will be available online. If you can't find the full text of your article this way, read on for more options!

Option 2: Look up the journal title in OskiCat or Melvyl.

You can also search for the title of the journal (NOT the article title!) in either OskiCat or Melvyl.  They will tell you:

Click this link for a 45-second demo.

Read more

Navigating Article Search Results in ANY Database

Ask yourself these questions, in order, about any citation for an article you want. Stop when the answer is yes. Keep going if you answer no.

1. Is there a full-text link or PDF icon? YES: Fantastic! Click on it. Then read it, print it, or email it. Stop here. NO: Go to #2.

2. Do you see a gold UC-eLinks icon?

YES: Good! Click on it, and then go to #3. (If it automatically opens the article for you, then stop here. Now you can read it, or email it.) NO: Then you'll need to open a new tab or window and go to oskicat.berkeley.edu. Do a title search for the title of the journal. Click on the journal title in the results and see if the volume and date you need are listed or whould be covered by the "Library Has" line. If so, write down the location and Call No., and then find the volume on the shelf. Stop here. If we don't have it at all, and you have a few days working leading time, then go to http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/services/interlibrary_loan.html#borrowing to order a scanned copy from another library.
3. Now is there a link under "Get it online?" YES: Click on the link (if there is more than one, make sure the link you choose includes the year you need), find the article, and read it, print it, or email it. Stop here. NO: Go to #4.
4. Do we have the journal in print? Click on "Check the UCB Library Catalog: OskiCat" link. YES: Click on the journal title and see if the volume and date you need are listed or would be covered by the "Library Has" line. If so, write down the location and Call No., and then find the volume on the shelf. NO: Go to #5
5. Do you have time to wait for it to come from another library (2+ working days)? YES: Then click on the "Request this from another library" link. Fill out the info on the REquest form. You'll receive an email with a link to the article when it has been scanned and sent. Stop here. NO: Go to #6
6. Are there other articles in the results that might work for you? YES: Click on the journal title and see if the volume and date you need are listed or would be covered by the "Library Has" line. If so, write down the location and Call No., and then find the volume on the shelf. NO: Go to #5

Modified from document created by Laura McClanathan, UCSC.

Where's the PDF?

Many article databases contain information about articles (citations or abstracts), not the entire text of the article.  Once you've used an article database to find articles on your topic, you may need to use this button:uc-eLinks button in order to locate and read the full text of the article. The UC-eLinks button appears in nearly all the databases available from the UCB Library website.

UC-eLinks will link you to the online full text of an article if UCB has paid for online access; otherwise, UC-eLinks will help you locate a print copy on the shelf in the library. If UCB doesn't own the article in print or online format, UC-eLinks can also help you order a copy from another library.

For more information, watch this video tutorial (about 4 min.)

You can also set up UC-eLinks to work with Google Scholar.  For more information, watch this 40-second demo.

Library Catalogs

OskiCat lists books, journal titles (but not individual articles), videos, and other materials in the UC Berkeley libraries.  You can also log into "My OskiCat" to renew or request items.  You can now send book locations and call numbers directly to your cell phone [here's how].

Melvyl covers all the UC campus libraries, and shows which libraries worldwide have an item.  It also lists some journal articles.

For more information, see our Guide to Library Catalogs.

Where's That Book?

PT9876.22.A6933 L8413 2010 

What is this number?

It's called a 'call number', and every book in the library has a unique one, which is printed on the spine of the book.

The call numbers tell you where the book is shelved, if you know how to read them.

call numbers

How to Avoid Plagiarism

In order to avoid plagiarism, you must give credit when

Recommendations

 

This content is part of the Understanding Plagiarism tutorial created by the Indiana University School of Education.

Citing your sources

Our guide to Citing Your Sources tells how to establish your paper's credibility and avoid plagiarism, and provides links to detailed examples of MLA and other citation formats.

American Sociological Association style manual

Citation Help

Citation Management.
Three citation management tools widely used at UC Berkeley are RefWorks, Endnote, and Zotero.  Each organizes citations and produces quick and easy bibliographies in many citation styles, including APA 6th.  Learn about other citation and writing tools on the EDP Library's Citation Management webpage.

RefWorks is free for UC Berkeley students, faculty and staff. From many of UC’s databases, importing citations is seamless and easy.  Create correctly cited bibliographies, footnotes, and in-text citations.  New users can sign up at RefWorks.  Find tutorials and tips for using RefWorks on the EDP Library webpage.

Zotero is free software for collecting, organizing, using and formatting citations.  Sign up and view this tool at zotero.org.

EndNote is software that must be purchased.  It’s available from UC Berkeley’s Software Central.  Find tutorals and tips for using EndNote via the Library webpage.

APA Style
Use the APA Publication Manual 6th edition in the EDP Library.  See the APA Style tab above for more information.

Widely cited journals and articles.
ISI Web of Knowledge - Social science citation index provides a "Cited Reference Search" feature which can be searched by cited author, work or year.  The ISI database provides "cited by" information on its search results page.  ISI's Journal Citation Reports will find a current list of most highly cited journals.   It should be noted, however, that ISI is evaluating a highly selective group of journal titles.  For example, only 130 education titles, 36 special education titles, and 49 educational psychology titles, a relatively small selection given the large number of journals published in education.  See the journal list at ISI WOS for specific titles. 

Google Scholar also provides on their initial search results screen a “cited by” link with the total number of citations.   Similarly, the CSA Illumina interface provides on their search results page, "cited by" links for more recent psychology articles.

All Questions Welcomed!

"There are no dumb questions!" student at reference desk

That's the philosophy of reference librarians, who are here to save you time and trouble. If you get stuck, you can talk to a reference librarian at any campus library

Other ways to get help

Other ways to get help:  in person, by e-mail, using specialized chat services

 

Research Advisory Service

Research Advisory Service for Cal Undergraduates

Book a 30-minute appointment with a librarian who will help refine and focus research inquiries, identify useful online and print sources, and develop search strategies for humanities and social sciences topics.

This service is for Cal undergraduates only. Graduate students and faculty should contact the library liaison to their department or program for specialized reference consultations.

Library FAQs

More questions?  Our FAQs may help. 

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