AFR AM R1B: Oratory of the African Diaspora

Contact Your Librarian

  • Jason M. Schultz
  • Chiwara

  • Office Hours: Weds. 1:30pm-3:00pm (675A Barrows), or by appt.
  • Office Location: 438 Doe Library
  • Contact Info:

    (510) 984-3012

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Searching Library Catalogs

Use OskiCat to locate materials related to your topic, including books, government publications, and audio and video recordings, in the libraries of UC Berkeley. OskiCat will show you the location and availability of the items that we own. 

Use Melvyl to locate materials related to your topic located at other campuses in the UC system. Next Generation Melvyl also allows you to expand your search to libraries worldwide. Clicking on the REQUEST button in the detailed view of a catalog record prompt you to fill out a form to request the item through our Interlibrary Loan office.

ebrary = ebooks

ebrary is our largest collection of full text ebooks, with 40,000 titles on a wide range of subjects. Find them in the UCB catalog, OskiCat (keyword: ebrary or limit to "Available Online"), or search the ebrary site directly:

Search ebrary

 

 

Online Reference & Text Collections

Article Databases

Primary Source Materials

Guide to Finding Historical Primary Sources at UC Berkeley Libraries

 

Malcolm X Audiotaped Speech at UC Berkeley (October 11, 1963)

Malcolm X Videotaped Interview at UC Berkeley (October 11, 1963)

Films

The Media Resources Center (MRC) at Moffitt Library is the UC Berkeley Library's primary collection of materials in electronic non-print (audio and visual) formats. These formats include: videocassettes, DVDs; compact audio discs; audiocassettes; and online (streamed) audio and video. Materials in the MRC collection may be used on-site in the Center by current UC Berkeley students and staff. Links to selected African American cinema and documentary films at the MRC below:

Newspapers

African American historical and current newspapers are also available electronically through subscription databases from UC Berkeley.  More are available through general U.S. current and historical newspaper databases.

The Library's Newspaper & Microforms Room holds a number of primary source African American newspapers from throughout the U.S. Papers on microfilm are shelved in title order by state.  Currently received print titles are shelved by title.  Some titles are also available in the Bancroft Library.  See selected titles in the UC Berkeley collection below.  Click on newspaper titles below to link to its OskiCat record.

The California Voice (Oakland, 1920-1998) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1 (separate issues)

Flatlands (Oakland, 1966-67) Location:  News/Micro MICROFILM 78777, Bancroft BANC NMP 6764:2:3

The Oakland Post (1963- )Location: News/Micro NEWSPRINT-1

The Sacramento Observer (Sacramento, 1962- ) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1 

The Sun-Reporter (San Francisco, 1943- )Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

The Peninsula Bulletin (East Palo Alto, 1967-1979) Location:  News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

Los Angeles Tribune (Los Angeles, 1941-1960) Location:  library only has selected issues, mainly from 1947-1952 in News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

The California Eagle (Los Angeles, 1897-1966) Location:  library has 1913-1930, 1944-53 in News/Micro NEWSFILM-1

Atlanta Daily World (Atlanta, GA 1932-  ) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1, library lack some issues

Baltimore Afro American (Baltimore, MD 1915-1987) Location: NRLF, library lacks some issues, issues for 1892-1898 in 19th U.S. Newspapers database.

Journal and Guide (Norfolk, VA 1901-1975) Location: NRLF, library lack some issues.

The Michigan Chronicle (Detroit, MI 1936- )Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1 (1943-1974)

Pittsburgh Courier (Pittsburgh, PA, 1923-1950, 1951-2002) Location: News/Micro NEWSFILM-1, library lacks some issues

Richmond Afro American (Richmond, VA, 1938-68) Location: NRLF, Library lacks same issues

The Stanford Library has one of the largest collection of newspapers in print and mircofilm in the United States.  They are available for on-site viewing by UCB afilliated persons.The Center for Research Libraries lends newspapers on microfilm to UCB patrons.  Many titles are listed on the Melvyl Catalog where you can request film by sent to UCB for use.

 

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but any are easier than doing it by hand!

  1. Zotero: A free plug-in that works exclusively with the Firefox browser: keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service. A guide is available.
  2. RefWorks - free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up. A guide is available.
  3. EndNote: may be purchased from UC Berkeley's Software Central.

It's always good to double check the formatting -- sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

Citation Styles

By following these guidelines, you avoid plagiarism, which is a serious violation of the Code of Student Conduct.

How do you cite sources?
The means to identify sources is to provide citations within your text linking appropriate passages to relevant resources consulted or quoted. This can be done through in-text parenthetic notes, footnotes, or endnotes. In addition, a bibliography or list of works cited, is almost always placed at the end of your paper. The citation system and format you use will be determined by the citation style you choose.

Below are links to guides for the three major styles used for most academic papers or research in the humanities, social sciences, and some scientific disciplines:

How do you choose a style?
Ask your instructor which style sheet he or she wishes you to use and if there are other special formatting instructions you should follow.

Where do I find the most authoritative information about these styles?
If you have questions or citations not covered by the Library's guides, please consult one of the following official style manuals. If you consult other, less official manuals or online style guides that purport to explain these style, please be aware that these sometimes contain errors which conflict with the official guides:

APA Style
Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association. 6th ed. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association, 2010 (call number: BF76.7.P83 2010, multiple libraries). Official APA style guide.
 
American Psychological Association's style guide FAQ
 
MLA Style
MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th ed. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2009 (call number: LB2369.G53 2009, multiple libraries). A somewhat simplified guide, adequate for undergraduate and most other research papers.
 
MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing. 3rd ed. New York: Modern Language Association of America, 2008 (call number: PN147.G444 2008, multiple libraries). For graduate students, scholars, and professional writers (more depth on copyright, legal issues, and writing theses, dissertations, and scholarly publishing).
 
Turabian Style
Turabian, Kate L. A Manual for Writers of Term Papers, Theses, and Dissertations, 6th edition. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1996 (call number: LB2369.T8 1996, multiple libraries).
 
Chicago Style
The Chicago Manual of Style. 15th ed. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003 (call number: Z253.U69 2003, multiple libraries).

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Research Advisory Service

Research Advisory Service for Cal Undergraduates

Book a 30-minute appointment with a librarian who will help refine and focus research inquiries, identify useful online and print sources, and develop search strategies for humanities and social sciences topics (examples of research topics).

Schedule, view, edit or cancel your appointment online (CalNetID required)

This service is for Cal undergraduates only. Graduate students and faculty should contact the library liaison to their department or program for specialized reference consultations.

Using Boolean Operators & Truncation

BOOLEAN OPERATORS

TRUNCATED SEARCHES

 

Library Workshop: Research 101

Unsure how to start a paper or research project? Think maybe you could stand to brush up ostudent with laptopn search strategies?

If this sounds familiar, Library Workshop: Research 101 has you covered. This interactive tutorial explores six stages of the research process. You can view it from start to finish, or focus on specific sections as needed:

1: Begin Your Research

Starting strategies, from choosing a topic to finding the right keywords.

 

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What is Peer Review?

Your instructor may want you to use "peer reviewed" articles as sources for your paper. Or you may be asked to find picture of thinking student"academic," "scholarly," or "refereed" articles. What do these terms mean?

Let's start with the terms academic and scholarly, which are synonyms. An academic or scholarly journal is one intended for a specialized or expert audience. Journals like this exist in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Examples include Nature, Journal of Sociology, and Journal of American Studies. Scholarly/academic journals exist to help scholars communicate their latest research and ideas to each other; they are written "by experts for experts."

Most scholarly/academic journals are peer reviewed; another synonym for peer reviewed is refereed. Before an article is published in a peer-reviewed journal, it's evaluated for quality and significance by several specialists in the same field, who are "peers" of the author. The article may go through several revisions before it finally reaches publication.

Magazines like Time or Scientific American, newspapers, (most) books, government documents, and websites are not peer-reviewed, though they may be thoroughly edited and fact-checked. Articles in scholarly journals (in printed format or online) usually ARE peer-reviewed.

How can you tell if an article is both scholarly and peer-reviewed?

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