SOC WEL 280: Introduction to Research

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  • Susan Edwards
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  • Office Location: Education Psychology Library, 2600 Tolman Hall
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About this Guide

Resources for the literature review (from the syllabus): Complete a literature review that includes both quantitative and qualitative studies and that builds the background and significance for your research question(s). This review should be organized around concepts that are important for understanding the topic and how these concepts relate to social work practice.

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides. 

Oxford Bibliographies

Oxford Bibliographies Online: Social Work --  leading scholars identify the most important and significant sources in the area of social work they know best. The guides feature a selective list of bibliographic citations supported by direct recommendations about which sources to consult, and UC-elinks links to the cited articles and books!

Find Articles

We have hundreds of research databases which help you find articles (and more) on a wide variety of topics. They are organized according to academic discipline, by name, or by type of database (dissertations, e-books, etc.)

UC eLinks and Citation Linker

Sometimes the database you search doesn't link to the fulltext -- it only gives the citation. Click the UC e-links button to see if Berkeley has it online, and if not, it will check for a print version.  And if we don't have it at all, it lets you request it through Interlibrary Loan.

What if there isn't a UC e-links button??? Sometimes you find an article in a bibliography, a book or a footnote -- and you want to see if we have it. The Citation Linker searches through our online databases to see if it's available fulltext. If not, it sets up a search for the paper journal in Melvyl. And if we don't have it at Berkeley, it lets you request it through Interlibrary Loan.

Find Books

UCB: Use OskiCat to find books related to your topic at UC Berkeley. Oskicat will show you where it's located, and will also show you the Library of Congress Subject Heading -- which can help you find material other relevant books.

UC: Not enough books  at Berkeley? Use Melvyl to find more books at other campuses in the UC system.  Use the REQUEST button (in the detailed view of a catalog record) to request the item through  Interlibrary Loan.

World: Still want more? You can search thousands of libraries through WorldCat on FirstSearch and then request the material through UC e-links or directly via Interlibrary Loan

Google Books: Library catalogs don't search inside of books. Google Books can help you identify the book you need, then click on "Find in a Library" to see if we have it.

Encyclopedias/Handbooks

Read more

E-Books

Springer Electronic Book Package E-books in many fields including Social WorkSocial Policy and Psychology.

APA e-book collection Current e-books published by the American Psychological Association from 2009 to date.

ebrary Berkeley's largest e-book collection, with thousands of  titles on a wide range of subjects, including social work, education and psychology. Some advanced ebrary features require downloading reader software.

Wiley Online Library Ebook Collection Fulltext books in social welfare and psychology from 2011.

Oxford Scholarship Online: Psychology

MIT CogNet E-books in cognitive and brain sciences published by MIT.

 

Connecting from Off Campus?

You can access UCB Library resources from off campus or via your laptop or other mobile device using one of two simple methods. (NOTE: Using EndNote? Use VPN, not the Proxy Server)

Proxy Server
After you make a one-time change in your web browser settings, the proxy server will ask you to log in with a CalNet ID or Library PIN when you click on the link to a licensed resource. See the setup instructions, FAQ, and Troubleshooting pages to configure your browser.

VPN (Virtual Private Network)
After you install and run the VPN "client" software on your computer, you can log in with a CalNet ID to establish a secure connection with the campus network.

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Google Scholar and UC e-links

  1. Set up your proxy server access by following the directions at http://proxy.lib.berkeley.edu/. When you get to a point where you are accessing resources that the Library pays for, you will be prompted for your CalNet ID and password.
  2. Change your “Scholar Preferences.” Access these by clicking on the link next to the search box. 
  3. In search box next to "Library Links," type in University of California Berkeley and click on “Find Library”
  4. Check box next to "University of California Berkeley - UC-eLinks
  5. Click on "Save Preferences" at bottom of page

Forward Citation

If an article is a few years old, but relevant to your topic, it can be very helpful to see who has cited it. This might be to see if the original research has been expanded upon or updated, or how it has been received. There are several different ways to do this, and the results will overlap --  no single method is comprehensive.

ISI Web of Science contains the Social Science Citation Index which allows you to do a "Cited Reference" search. This shows other articles (from a prestigious list of peer reviewed journals) which have cited the target article, and it also shows the references for the the original article... both forward and backward citation.

Google Scholar also provides forward citations for some articles. It has a broader range of documents included (not just peer reviewed journals, but reports, pre-prints, etc.) and doesn't eliminate self citation or de-duplicate the results.

CSA Illumina Databases sometimes provides Cited References for articles indexed in the CSA databases such as Social Services Abstracts, ERIC, EconLit, PsycInfo, etc.

 


 

For this class, we are going to use the following citation as an example:

Stone, S. (2007). Child maltreatment, out-of-home placement and academic vulnerability: A fifteen-year review of evidence and future directions. Children and Youth Services Review, 29(2), 139-161.

 

Evidence Based Practice

Evidence Based Practice, to quote Professor Gambrill, is "a new educational and practice paradigm for closing the gaps between research and practice to maximize opportunities to help clients and avoid harm.”

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but any are easier than doing it by hand! The Library offers workshops on Endnote, Zotero, and Refworks! Or contact your librarian for individual help.

  1. Zotero: A free plug-in that works exclusively with the Firefox browser: keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service.
  2. RefWorks - free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up.
  3. EndNote: may be purchased from UC Berkeley's Software Central for about $80.

It's always good to double check the formatting -- sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

Importing from CSA to RefWorks

Importing from Social Services Abstracts (or any CSA database) into RefWorks

  1. Search CSA Social Services Abstracts.
  2. Select the desired references by checking the box to the left of each citation.
  3. After all the desired citations have been selected, click on RefWorks
  4. You will be asked if you want the records added, if so click on Export to RefWorks. (If you have a pop up blocker, it will then confirm that you do want to open RefWorks.)
  5. RefWorks then displays the last citations you added, and you can choose to add them to a specific folder . Or you can just leave them in the Last Imported folder. (If you want to create a new folder, just click on Folder and the drop down arrow will let you select make a new one.

RefWorks with Oskicat

Search OskiCat. Once you have records you want to export, if you are:

A. Viewing a list of results, check the box to the left of each record you wish to add to RefWorks, then click Save Selected Records, or

B. Viewing an individual record, click the Save Records button near the top of the window and then:

  1. Click the View Saved button near the top of the window
  2. Click Export Saved
  3. Select EndNote/RefWorks under Format of List
  4. Select Screen under Send List To
  5. Click Submit
  6. Use your browser’s Select All function, then Copy
  7. Open another browser window and access your RefWorks Account.
  8. Click References from the drop-down menu and select Import
  9. In the drop-down menu next to Import Filter/Data Source, choose Innovative Interfaces (EndNote/RefWorks Format)
  10. For Database, choose University of California, Berkeley
  11. In Import References into Folder, choose the desired folder, if you have already created a folder into which you want these references to import.  If not, make no selection here
  12. Click Import
  13. Select the radio button next to Import Data from the following Text.
  14.  Put your cursor in the box below Import Data from the following Text and select Edit > Paste in your browser.
  15. By default, all newly imported references appear in the Last Imported folder. Under View / Folders, select your folder to see the citations you just imported.  Note the UC-eLinks icon next to each reference.

Thanks to the Public Health Library for creating this guide!

Zotero Tips

If you've never used Zotero before, use the QuickStart Guide to get started.

Change your preferences if you want  Zotero to

To use Zotero to find specific articles in our library's databases, set up the Open URL resolver with this link: http://ucelinks.cdlib.org:8888/sfx_local? 

 

Search Tips

Power search features for most article databases:
  • Use synonyms -- there are many ways to express a concept (teenager or teenagers or adolescent)
  • Use truncation to get different forms of the word, for example teenage* will retrieve teenagers, teenager, teenaged, etc.
  • Use quotation marks when you want an "exact phrase"
  • Restrict by date -- most will let you find only the most current five years if you chose that limit.

UC eLinks and Citation Linker

Sometimes the database you search doesn't link to the fulltext -- it only gives the citation. Click the UC e-links button to see if Berkeley has it online, and if not, it will check for a print version.  And if we don't have it at all, it lets you request it through Interlibrary Loan.

What if there isn't a UC e-links button??? Sometimes you find an article in a bibliography, a book or a footnote -- and you want to see if we have it. The Citation Linker searches through our online databases to see if it's available fulltext. If not, it sets up a search for the paper journal in Melvyl. And if we don't have it at Berkeley, it lets you request it through Interlibrary Loan.

PsycInfo Search Tips

PsycInfo Thesaurus

Using the PsycINFO Thesaurus is a poweful way to search. It finds related terms, and can clarify how the database defines a concept.

PsycINFO screen shot, select Advanced Search

Select Thesaurus from AdvancedSearch

Search topic of interest in thesaurus

Click on note to see related terms

Select related terms of interest, add with OR

 

Lexis Nexis Tips

  1. Use truncation (wildcard) to search different forms of the word (child* retrieves child, child's, children)
  2. Use 'proximity connectors' -- w/[number], for example (youth or adolescent or teen*) w/25 homeless*. (You can also use w/s for within sentence, or w/p for within paragraph but you can't also combine these with the number of words.)
  3. Change the display to Expanded List -- shows you your search terms, plus a few words on either side.
  4. Change display to Relevance if it is on Chronological (if date is really important to you, restrict to the date range you want in the search box).

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