COLWRIT R1A: California Dreaming: Imagining California - Taylor

Contact Your Librarian

  • Jennifer Dorner

  • Office Hours: By appointment
  • Office Location: 212/218 Doe Library
  • Contact Info:

    510.768.7059 or Skype ucblib.jdorner
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About this Guide

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

Doe, Main Stacks, Moffitt Library Floorplans

Looking for a location or call number in Doe, Main Stacks or Moffitt?  Try the floorplans, or ask for assistance!

Campus Library Map

Click on the image below to see a larger interactive version of the campus library map.

UC Berkeley Library campus map

You can also view/download a PDF map of library locations. For library contact information and building addresses, visit our directory.

Off-campus Access to Library Resources

Before you can access Library resources from off campus make sure you have configured your computer with proxy server settings.

After you make a one-time change in your web browser settings, the proxy server will ask you to log in with a CalNet ID or Library PIN when you click on the link to a licensed resource.

Printing and Scanning in the Libraries

All libraries on campus are equipped with "bookscan stations," which allow you to scan documents and save them to a USB drive, or to scan documents and then send them to a printer.

In order to scan documents, you must have the following:picture of open book

  1. A Cal 1 Card, with money loaded onto it (go here to make a deposit to your Cal 1 Card account). This is not the same as meal plan points! Your Cal 1 Card debit account is a separate fund on your card.
  2. A USB drive (you cannot email a scanned document from a bookscan station; you must save your document to a USB drive)
  3. Scanning and saving to a USB drive is 5 cents a page for students.
  4. Scanning documents and sending them to the printer is 10 cents a page for students. Color printing is 60 cents a page.

In order to send documents to the printer from any of the public computers in the libraries, you must have the following:

  1. A Cal 1 Card, with money loaded onto it (see above)
  2. A document that's on the Web or attached to your email (the public computers in the libraries will not open files from a USB or other drive)
  3. Printing is 10 cents a page for students (black and white). Color printing is 60 cents a page.

Have more questions? There's more info here.

Researching Local Topics

Researching local topics may require you to go beyond the resources of the Doe and Moffitt Libraries and even beyond the resources that are available through the Library's web site. Important collections of local resources are available in libraries across campus, especially in the Environmental Design Library, the Bancroft Library, the Ethnic Studies Library and the Institute of Governmental Studies Library. There is a very extensive guide on Finding Local Information at http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/ENVI/locinfoAC.html.

Researchers looking for information on local topics often start with newspapers. The selection of newspaper databases listed below cover more recent news. Newspapers not included in these databases may be available in microfilm and located in News & Washington local newspapers. Most are available on microfilm and are housed in the Newspapers & Microfilm collection on the lower level of Doe Library. Others in print or on microfilm may be located in the Bancroft Library or in the Institute of Governmental Studies Library.

To determine whether we own a specific newspaper and its location, search OskiCat for the title of the newspaper (example: Chicago Defender).

If you don't know the title of the newspaper, another option is to search OskiCat for newspapers by subject or by city. Go to the Advanced Keyword Search page in OskiCat and choose "Subject" from the first drop down menu. Then fill in the blank search box with keywords for your topic. Some examples might be:

african americans los angeles newspapers
chinese american newspapers san francisco

Articles related to your topic may also have appeared in magazines or scholarly journals. One place to start searching is in the interdisciplinary databases listed below. If those aren't sufficient, you can locate many other databases by title, discipline or type from our Electronic Resources page. Use the search feature to find what resources we have related to California.

erf search


Printing and Scanning in the Libraries

All libraries on campus are equipped with "bookscan stations," which allow you to scan documents and save them to a USB drive, or to scan documents and then send them to a printer.

In order to scan documents, you must have the following:picture of open book

  1. A Cal 1 Card, with money loaded onto it (go here to make a deposit to your Cal 1 Card account). This is not the same as meal plan points! Your Cal 1 Card debit account is a separate fund on your card.
  2. A USB drive (you cannot email a scanned document from a bookscan station; you must save your document to a USB drive)
  3. Scanning and saving to a USB drive is 5 cents a page for students.
  4. Scanning documents and sending them to the printer is 10 cents a page for students. Color printing is 60 cents a page.

In order to send documents to the printer from any of the public computers in the libraries, you must have the following:

  1. A Cal 1 Card, with money loaded onto it (see above)
  2. A document that's on the Web or attached to your email (the public computers in the libraries will not open files from a USB or other drive)
  3. Printing is 10 cents a page for students (black and white). Color printing is 60 cents a page.

Have more questions? There's more info here.

Newspapers on Microfilm

microfilm reel

Because of their fragility as they age, newspapers have traditionally been preserved by microfilming them.

Microfilm is located in the Newspaper and Microfilm Room in 40 Doe Library and in Bancroft Library.  Newspaper films are arranged geographically within the News/Micro collection [floorplan.pdf]

Reader/printers allow you to read the films and those in News/Micro allow you to save pages to flash drives in .jpg and .pdf format.

Most newspapers do not have indexes.  How do you find articles by subject? By knowing the approximate date of the event you are studying.  If you don't know the date, you can use the index to a different newspaper as a way to find out.

To determine whether we have microfilmed newspapers for the city or region of interest, try these search techniques in OskiCat.

SUBJECT SEARCHING: Select "Subject Heading" as the search type and enter your search using one of the structures suggested below:

African American newspapers
Mexican Americans--Illinois--Chicago--Newspapers
Warsaw (Poland) --Newspapers
Paris (France)--Newspapers

KEYWORD SEARCHING: Combine search terms with AND and OR. Use * (truncation symbol) to search for multiple word endings. For example:

newspaper* and (poland or polish)
newspaper* and mexic*
(soviet or russia*) and newspaper*

NOTE: these searches will produce results including both newspapers and books about newspapers, unless you limit your search to Newspapers/Microforms.

 

California & Historic Newspapers

Please Note: A librarian at Bowling Green University has compiled a guide that, according to her, lists all publicly accessible digitized historical newspapers. This is new, so I haven't had a chance to explore it, but it looks like it might be very useful for some of you.

In News/Micro you will find microfilm of many California newspapers. Few of them are indexed so you should prepare before your visit a list of dates of issues that you want to look at.

The San Francisco Chronicle is available full text online only up to 1922. Indexes for other years are available in News/Micro:
 
1913-1949 San Francisco Newspapers Index (Also see Microfiche 10904 Guide) MICROFICHE 10904 NEWS/MICRO
1950-1980 San Francisco Newspapers Index MICROFICHE 10503 NEWS/MICRO
July 1970-Sept 1975 California News Index AJ3.C16 NEWS/MICRO
1976- present San Francisco Chronicle Index AJ21. S25. N4 NEWS/MICRO

To find other newspapers, search for them by title in OskiCat. See: Searching newspaper titles in OskiCat:  The Movie!  (40 seconds)

Searching Library Catalogs

oskicat logo

Use OskiCat to locate materials related to your topic, including books, government publications, and  audio and video recordings, in the libraries of UC Berkeley. OskiCat will show you the location and availability of the items that we own. More OskiCat help.

melvyl logo

 

 

Use Melvyl to locate materials related to your topic located at other campuses in the UC system, or worldwide. You can use the Request button to request an item from another library, if we don't own it. Detailed Melvyl help.

In every catalog you use, not the name of the physical library, call number, and whether or not the item is checked out, library use only, etc.

Call numbers are usually located on the spine of the book; learn how to read them so you can easily find what you need on the shelves.

Finding Local History

Here are some terms you can use in OskiCat or Melvyl that may help you find books on your topic. magnifying glass imageRemember, these search engines only let you search brief information about the books - you're not searching in the full text of the books themselves! If you're not getting enough results, try leaving out some search terms, searching for a less specific topic (Southeast Asian Americans instead of Cambodian Americans) using Google Books, or asking a librarian.

All of these terms are Library of Congress subject headings -- which means you'll get the most complete results if you enter them exactly as typed (African Americans, not African American).

To retrieve information about... Enter terms as a subject search:
a county's history Alameda County (Calif.) History.
a city's history Richmond (Calif.) History
a person Muir, John
a company Kaiser Aluminum and Chemical Corporation

Another option is to do a keyword search that combines key terms relating to your topic:

sacramento and population
san quentin and history
japanese and discrimination and california
russian and emigration and california

Using call numbers to find books

Books and journals are arranged on our shelves according to the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. Each is assigned a unique call number based on its subject matter and other characteristics. Items on the same subject will often be grouped together.

Each call number consists of several elements. For example, consider:

TK
7881.6
M29
1993

The FIRST line, TK, is based on the broad subject of the book. Within Class T for technology, TK represents electrical engineering.

The SECOND line, 7881.6, defines the subject matter more finely. When looking for the book, read this as a whole number with a decimal component. In this example, TK7881.6 represents magnetic recording (a subdivision of TK— electrical engineering).

The THIRD line, M29, usually indicates author, but may also represent a further subject subdivision, geographic area, etc. There may also be a fourth line, formatted the same way. When looking for the book, read the numeric component as if it were preceded by a decimal point. In the example above, the numeric part of M29 should be read as ".29" (and the call number TK7881.6 M29 comes before TK7881.6 M4).

The YEAR of publication, such as 1993, may also be present. These file in chronological order and often indicate successive editions of a book. The call number may also have additional elements, such as volume numbers.

In using a call number to locate a book on the shelf, consider each element in turn before moving on to the next segment.

These call numbers are arranged as they should appear on the shelves. In each case, the element shown in boldface distinguishes the number from the preceding one:

Q
76
K26
QA
17
F75
QA
17.1
C98
TK
3
Z37
TK
29
M49
TK
29
M5
1997
TK
29
M5
2007

Film and Video in OskiCat

You can use the Media Resource Center's website to browse for films on your research topic, or you can use OskiCat to find films and videos in the UC Berkeley Libraries. Enter your search terms in the "Keyword" box, like this:

social protest california

Use the "Entire Collection" pulldown menu to restrict your search to "Films/Videos/Slides." Your search results may include online video as well as items in the Media Resources Center collection, or elsewhere in the campus libraries.

oskciat screenshot

Research Advisory Service

Research Advisory Service for Cal Undergraduates

Book a 30-minute appointment with a librarian who will help refine and focus research inquiries, identify useful online and print sources, and develop search strategies for humanities and social sciences topics (examples of research topics).

This service is for Cal undergraduates only. Graduate students and faculty should contact the library liaison to their department or program for specialized reference consultations.

Scheduling a consultation

bcal screenshot Some reference questions can't be easily answered over e-mail and I am happy to talk with you in person or over the phone if your question is more complex or if you'd like a more in-depth consultation. Trying to schedule appointments via email is time-consuming. Here are some alternatives:

1. Call me at 510-768-7059

2. Go to my bCal calendar and in the upper right corner choose the WEEK view. Locate a free slot between 9-5, Mon-Fri that works with your schedule. You can propose an appointment in bCal or contact me by email asking me to reserve that slot for you.

Starting February 19, every Wednesday from 1-3 I will also be available to answer your questions in the History Department's office.  

 

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