HISTART R1B: This Is So Contemporary! Art of the 21st Century

Contact Your Librarian

  • Heather Thams
  • heather thams photo

  • Office Hours: Mon/Tues/Thurs 10am-5pm (by appointment)
  • Office Location: 212 Doe Library
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About this Guide

A guide for students in section 4 of History of Art R1B, focusing on twenty-first century art.

Starting Points

1.  Read an introduction to the campus libraries for undergraduates.Campanile and Golden Gate Bridge

2.  Set up your computer for off campus access to library databases.

3.  Need a map of the campus libraries? Doe and Moffitt floor plans are here.

4.  Each library has its own hours and they may change on holidays and between semesters - click on the calendar for each library to view a month at a time.

5.  Information about citing your sources and links to guides for frequently used citation styles here.

Off-campus Access to Library Resources

Before you can access Library resources from off campus make sure you have configured your computer with proxy server settings.

After you make a one-time change in your web browser settings, the proxy server will ask you to log in with a CalNet ID or Library PIN when you click on the link to a licensed resource.

Beyond the Web

"It's all free on the Internet, right? Why should I go through the library's website to find sources for my paper?"

Library logo

The Web is a great source for free, publicly available information. However, the Library pays for thousands of electronic books, journals, and other information resources that are available only to the campus community. Through the Library website, you can access hundreds of different licensed databases containing journal articles, electronic books, maps, images, government and legal information, current and historical newspapers, digitized primary sources, and more. 

You access these resources through the Internet, using a browser like Firefox, Chrome or Internet Explorer -- but these databases are not part of the free, public Web. Resources like Lexis-Nexis, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete, and ARTstor are "invisible" to Google. You will not see results from most library databases in the results of a Google search.

Want to find out more? Get started exploring the Library's electronic resources, or find out how to get access to licensed resources from off-campus.

Printing and Scanning in the Libraries

All libraries on campus are equipped with "bookscan stations," which allow you to:

Scanning to a USB drive is free.  Moffitt Copy Center sells flash drives.

Scanning documents to print is 8 cents a page (color printing: 60 cents a page).picture of open book

In order to send documents to the printer from any of the public computers in the libraries, you must have the following:

Have more questions? There's more info here.

Searching Library Catalogs

oskicat logo Use OskiCat to locate materials related to your topic, including books, government publications, and  audio and video recordings, in the libraries of UC Berkeley. OskiCat will show you the location and availability of the items that we own.

melvyl logo

Use Melvyl to locate materials related to your topic located at other campuses in the UC system, or worldwide. You can use the Request button to request an item from another library, if we don't own it.

Melvyl has changed as of January 2012, and now includes many more articles.  Detailed Melvyl help

ebrary = ebooks

ebrary is our largest collection of full text ebooks, with nearly 50,000 titles on a wide range of subjects. Find them in the UCB catalog, OskiCat (keyword: ebrary or limit to "Available Online"), or search the ebrary site directly:

Search ebrary

 

Getting started with ebrary

You do allow embedded content.

Google Books

Google Books contains millions of scanned books, from libraries and publishers worldwide. You can search the entire text of the books, view previews or "snippets" from books that are still in copyright, and read the full text of out-of-copyright (pre-1923) books.  Want to read the entire text of an in-copyright book?  Use Google Books' Find in a Library link to locate the book in a UC Berkeley library, or search OskiCat to see if UC Berkeley owns the book.

Why use Google Books?

Library catalogs (like OskiCat) don't search inside books; using a library catalog, you can search only information about the book (title, author, Library of Congress subject headings, etc.).  Google Books will let you search inside books, which can be very useful for hard-to-find information.  Try it now:

Google Book Search

Finding Exhibition Catalogs in the Libraries

The UC Berkeley libraries do collect exhibition catalogs (sometimes spelled "catalogues" in the UK, Australia, and Canada) but they  can be a little tricky to find. The best way is usually to search OskiCat or Melvyl with the name of the artist, and the word exhibitions (not exhibition). It's usually OK to leave out the term "catalog" or "catalogue," since it's not always spelled the same way.

If you're looking for exhibitions featuring art from a specific place or time, try searches like this:

Note: Because of the way the items in OskiCat are described using the Library of Congress classification system, the search terms china art will usually get you more results than chinese art!

You can also use 20th century or 21st century (not "twentieth century" or "twenty-first century") as a search term: art china 21st century exhibitions. In addition, the database Art Full Text also contains digitized exhibition catalogs. (If you're off-campus, you'll need to set up off-campus access to use this tool).

Art Images and Art History Databases

Where's the PDF?

Many article databases contain information about articles (citations or abstracts), not the entire text of the article.  Once you've used an article database to find articles on your topic, you may need to use uc-elinks button in order to locate and read the full text of the article. The UC-eLinks button appears in nearly all the databases available from the UCB Library website.

UC-eLinks will link you to the online full text of an article if UCB has paid for online access; otherwise, UC-eLinks will help you locate a print copy on the shelf in the library. If UCB doesn't own the article in print or online format, UC-eLinks can also help you order a copy from another library.

For more information, watch this video tutorial (about 4 min.)

You can also set up UC-eLinks to work with Google Scholar.  For more information, watch this brief demo (about 40 seconds.)

Online Biographical Sources

Finding Biographical and Background Info in OskiCat

OskiCat lets you know what books are available in the UC Berkeley Libraries. OskiCat does NOT index picture of magnifying glassarticles, but it's a good way to find out what books we have and which magazines and journals the Library subscribes to. To see if any books have been written about the artist you're researching, try searching their name as a subject (last name first).

From the Quick Search screen, choose the "Subject begins with..." option from the pulldown menu, then enter your artist's name, last name first (e.g., leonard, zoe). This will let you find books ABOUT Zoe Leonard. To find books both by and about Leonard, enter her name in the Keyword (default) search box. Either zoe leonard or leonard zoe wil work in Keyword search.

To find books that discuss and critique a given artist's works, use the Keyword search. Enter the artist's name plus the word criticism, like this: kara walker criticism and interpretation.

Finding Recent Art Reviews

Library Workshop: Research 101

Unsure how to start a paper or research project? Think maybe you could stand to brush up ostudent with laptopn search strategies?

If this sounds familiar, Library Workshop: Research 101 has you covered. This interactive tutorial explores six stages of the research process. You can view it from start to finish, or focus on specific sections as needed:

1: Begin Your Research

Starting strategies, from choosing a topic to finding the right keywords.

2: Knowledge Cycle

The publication timeline, scholarly vs. popular sources, and differences in academic disciplines.

3: Finding Books

Search for books and other items in OskiCat, Cal's local library catalog.

4: Finding Articles

Locate and access articles in library research databases.

5: Make Citations

How to cite your sources correctly.

6: Basic Search

Common techniques for constructing searches that yield useful results.

7: Advanced Search

Specialized search strategies for targeting specific topics.

How to Narrow Your Topic

"I'm writing a paper on World War II." 

Often students start their research with a very general topic, even though they may realize the topic is too large to deal with in a 10-15 page paper.  Faculty and librarians tell them, "You have to narrow this down."  But how do you narrow a topic?

Ask yourself--

You can combine these ideas, "What were the major impacts of WWII on women in France, in the decade after the war?"

More ideas in our brief tutorial on topic selection and narrowing. 

What is Peer Review?

Your instructor may want you to use "peer reviewed" articles as sources for your paper. Or you may be asked to find picture of thinking student"academic," "scholarly," or "refereed" articles. What do these terms mean?

Let's start with the terms academic and scholarly, which are synonyms. An academic or scholarly journal is one intended for a specialized or expert audience. Journals like this exist in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Examples include Nature, Journal of Sociology, and Journal of American Studies. Scholarly/academic journals exist to help scholars communicate their latest research and ideas to each other; they are written "by experts for experts."

Most scholarly/academic journals are peer reviewed; another synonym for peer reviewed is refereed. Before an article is published in a peer-reviewed journal, it's evaluated for quality and significance by several specialists in the same field, who are "peers" of the author. The article may go through several revisions before it finally reaches publication.

Magazines like Time or Scientific American, newspapers, (most) books, government documents, and websites are not peer-reviewed, though they may be thoroughly edited and fact-checked. Articles in scholarly journals (in printed format or online) usually ARE peer-reviewed.

How can you tell if an article is both scholarly and peer-reviewed?

Read more

Formatting Citations

Citing Images

Here are some helpful links that should get you started with citing images:image of an African sculpture

Image Citation Guide (from Purdue University)

Citing Images (from the University of Washington, Bothell)

Citation Examples (from ArtSTOR)

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, organize and store your PDFs, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but all are easier than doing it by hand!

  1. Zotero: Free software that keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service. Zotero is available as a stand-alone application that syncs with Chrome and Safari, or as a bookmarklet for mobile browsers.
  2. RefWorks - web-based and free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies, then works with Word to help you format references and a bibliography for your paper. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up.
  3. EndNote: Desktop software for managing your references and formatting bibliographies. You can purchase EndNote from the Cal Student Store

Tip: After creating a bibliography with a citation management tool, it's always good to double check the formatting; sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

How to Avoid Plagiarism

In order to avoid plagiarism, you must give credit when

Recommendations

 

This content is part of the Understanding Plagiarism tutorial created by the Indiana University School of Education.

Ask a Librarian 24/7 Chat

You do allow embedded content.

You can type your question directly into this chat window to chat with a librarian. Your question may be answered by a reference librarian from Berkeley, from another UC campus, or another academic library elsewhere in the US.  We share information about our libraries to make sure you get good answers.

If the librarian can't answer you well enough, your question will be referred to a Berkeley librarian for follow-up.

Have fun chatting!

All Questions Welcomed!

"There are no dumb questions!" student at reference desk

That's the philosophy of reference librarians, who are here to save you time and trouble. If you get stuck, you can talk to a reference librarian at any campus library

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