HIST 100: Berkeley in the Sixties - Martin

Contact Your Librarian

  • Jennifer Dorner

  • Office Hours: By appointment
  • Office Location: 212/218 Doe Library
  • Contact Info:

    510.768.7059 or Skype ucblib.jdorner
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About this Guide

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

Campus Library Map

Click on the image below to see a larger interactive version of the campus library map.

UC Berkeley Library campus map

You can also view/download a PDF map of library locations. For library contact information and building addresses, visit our directory.

Off-campus Access to Library Resources

Before you can access Library resources from off campus make sure you have configured your computer with proxy server settings.

After you make a one-time change in your web browser settings, the proxy server will ask you to log in with a CalNet ID or Library PIN when you click on the link to a licensed resource.

Doe, Main Stacks, Moffitt Library Floorplans

Looking for a location or call number in Doe, Main Stacks or Moffitt?  Try the floorplans, or ask for assistance!

Ask a Librarian 24/7 Chat

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Staying Informed

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The UC Berkeley History Collection News blog will keep you informed of new digital collections, trials of resources, workshops, events related to History collections, and other news of interest to researchers in History. Options for accessing the blog include:

Daily Cal

There is no one source you can use to search the entire run of the Daily Cal; to find articles on your topic you'll need to use an index. Complicating matters is that the index to the Daily Cal has changed format many times, so where you look depends on the time period you are interested in.

1874-1929 is indexed in a card file in Bancroft’s University Archive.  Easier to get to is the microfilm copy of the card file, which is in Newspaper/Micro Room under call no.: MICROFILM 20031 (3 reels).

1930-June 1991 is indexed in card file located in Newspaper/Micro Room.

July 1991-June 1994 is indexed in a printed index, which can be found in both: Doe Reference Periodical Indexes [AJ21.D333] and in the Newspaper Microform Room [AJ21.D29] and at the Online Archive of California.

September 1997 - current is in Lexis/Nexis (use Easy Search, enter Daily Californian in the By Source Title box

 search box Lexis Nexis database

June 1999 - current is also indexed and searchable on the Daily Cal website.

 

Newspapers on Microfilm

microfilm reel

Because of their fragility as they age, newspapers have traditionally been preserved by microfilming them.

Microfilm is located in the Newspaper and Microfilm Room in 40 Doe Library and in Bancroft Library.  Newspaper films are arranged geographically within the News/Micro collection [floorplan.pdf]

Reader/printers allow you to read the films and those in News/Micro allow you to save pages to flash drives in .jpg and .pdf format.

Most newspapers do not have indexes.  How do you find articles by subject? By knowing the approximate date of the event you are studying.  If you don't know the date, you can use the index to a different newspaper as a way to find out.

To determine whether we have microfilmed newspapers for the city or region of interest, try these search techniques in OskiCat.

SUBJECT SEARCHING: Select "Subject Heading" as the search type and enter your search using one of the structures suggested below:

African American newspapers
Mexican Americans--Illinois--Chicago--Newspapers
Warsaw (Poland) --Newspapers
Paris (France)--Newspapers

KEYWORD SEARCHING: Combine search terms with AND and OR. Use * (truncation symbol) to search for multiple word endings. For example:

newspaper* and (poland or polish)
newspaper* and mexic*
(soviet or russia*) and newspaper*

NOTE: these searches will produce results including both newspapers and books about newspapers, unless you limit your search to Newspapers/Microforms.

 

California Newspapers

The Library has only a few online sources for newspapers covering the 1960s, and the only California title we own for that period is the Los Angeles Times, which can be accessed through Historical Newspapers (Proquest).
In News/Micro you will find microfilm of many California newspapers. Few of them are indexed so you should prepare before your visit a list of dates of issues that you want to look at.

The San Francisco Chronicle is available full text online only up to 1922. Indexes for other years are available in News/Micro:
 
1913-1949 San Francisco Newspapers Index (Also see Microfiche 10904 Guide) MICROFICHE 10904 NEWS/MICRO
1950-1980 San Francisco Newspapers Index MICROFICHE 10503 NEWS/MICRO
July 1970-Sept 1975 California News Index AJ3.C16 NEWS/MICRO
1976- present San Francisco Chronicle Index AJ21. S25. N4 NEWS/MICRO

To find other newspapers, search for them by title in OskiCat. See: Searching newspaper titles in OskiCat:  The Movie!  (40 seconds)

Locating Primary Sources

There are many access points to the vast collections of primary sources available to you.

Certain words and phrases will find primary sources in library catalogs.  You can use these in OskiCat or Melvyl:

advanced keyword search -correspondence
-sources
-diaries
-personal narratives
-interviews
-speeches
-documents
-archives
-early works to 1800
-newspapers

For specific search strategies, see the Library's guide to Finding Historical Primary Sources.

Your searches will be more successful if, in your preliminary research, you identify specific:

 

Local and Digital Collections

This page includes a sample of the primary source collections related to Berkeley in the Sixties that are available to you in The Library or online.

California Loyalty Oath The database linked below provides digitized access to select content held in the University of California archives. The Loyalty Oath website was built in conjunction with a symposium held on the Berkeley campus in 1999 to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the controversy. It includes digitized content from the symposium and select hisotrical documents.

Disability Rights Movement This collection explores the social and political history of the disability movement from the 1960s to the present. The extensive collection of oral histories and archival materials is arranged geographically, alphabetically, and by organization, but you may find it most useful to look at the materials arranged by research topic.

University of California History Digital Archives This site provides online access to some of the historical materials collected on the University of California system, including the history of the Berkeley campus.

Searching Library Catalogs

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Use OskiCat to locate materials related to your topic, including books, government publications, and  audio and video recordings, in the libraries of UC Berkeley. OskiCat will show you the location and availability of the items that we own. More OskiCat help.

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Use Melvyl to locate materials related to your topic located at other campuses in the UC system, or worldwide. You can use the Request button to request an item from another library, if we don't own it. Detailed Melvyl help.

In every catalog you use, not the name of the physical library, call number, and whether or not the item is checked out, library use only, etc.

Call numbers are usually located on the spine of the book; learn how to read them so you can easily find what you need on the shelves.

OskiCat Search Terms

Here are some terms you can use in OskiCat or Melvyl that may help you find books on your topic. magnifying glass imageRemember, these search engines only let you search brief information about the books - you're not searching in the full text of the books themselves! If you're not getting enough results, try leaving out some search terms, searching for a less specific topic (Southeast Asian Americans instead of Cambodian Americans) using Google Books, or asking a librarian.

All of these terms are Library of Congress subject headings -- which means you'll get the most complete results if you enter them exactly as typed (African Americans, not African American).

Read more

Film and Video in OskiCat

You can use the Media Resource Center's website to browse for films on your research topic, or you can use OskiCat to find films and videos in the UC Berkeley Libraries. Enter your search terms in the "Keyword" box, like this:

social protest california

Use the "Entire Collection" pulldown menu to restrict your search to "Films/Videos/Slides." Your search results may include online video as well as items in the Media Resources Center collection, or elsewhere in the campus libraries.

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Using call numbers to find books

Books and journals are arranged on our shelves according to the Library of Congress (LC) classification system. Each is assigned a unique call number based on its subject matter and other characteristics. Items on the same subject will often be grouped together.

Each call number consists of several elements. For example, consider:

TK
7881.6
M29
1993

The FIRST line, TK, is based on the broad subject of the book. Within Class T for technology, TK represents electrical engineering.

The SECOND line, 7881.6, defines the subject matter more finely. When looking for the book, read this as a whole number with a decimal component. In this example, TK7881.6 represents magnetic recording (a subdivision of TK— electrical engineering).

The THIRD line, M29, usually indicates author, but may also represent a further subject subdivision, geographic area, etc. There may also be a fourth line, formatted the same way. When looking for the book, read the numeric component as if it were preceded by a decimal point. In the example above, the numeric part of M29 should be read as ".29" (and the call number TK7881.6 M29 comes before TK7881.6 M4).

The YEAR of publication, such as 1993, may also be present. These file in chronological order and often indicate successive editions of a book. The call number may also have additional elements, such as volume numbers.

In using a call number to locate a book on the shelf, consider each element in turn before moving on to the next segment.

These call numbers are arranged as they should appear on the shelves. In each case, the element shown in boldface distinguishes the number from the preceding one:

Q
76
K26
QA
17
F75
QA
17.1
C98
TK
3
Z37
TK
29
M49
TK
29
M5
1997
TK
29
M5
2007

HathiTrust

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HathiTrust (Hathi is pronounced hah-tee) is a partnership of libraries that works towards the goal of developing a shared digital access, preservation, and storage solution for the materials held in the member libraries. The contents of HathiTrust are similar to that of Google Books, but the collecting focus is on scholarly materials and the resource includes content and features (such as indexing and manipulation of results) not available in Google Books.

Downloading PDFs

 
Tips for searching HathiTrust:
 
Tips for doing a full-text search:

Creating Collections

  1. On the Collections page, click on login.
  2. Choose the University of California, Berkeley from the drop down list and click on login.
  3. Enter your CalNet ID and passphrase.
  4. Click on Create a New Collection and name your collection (the description is optional).
  5. Indicate whether it is a Private or Public collection.
  6. Click on Add.

In the future if you want to edit, change the private/public setting, or delete the collection, your collections will always be listed in the My Collections tab whenever you are logged in to HathiTrust.

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