EDUC 288: Intersectionality in Education Research

Contact Your Librarian

  • Susan Edwards
  • Office Hours: By appointment
  • Office Location: Education Psychology Library, 2600 Tolman Hall
  • Contact Info:

    510-643-6224

About this Guide

Explores the theoretical and methodological questions raised by the concept of intersectionality - the idea that human beings possess multiple identities simultaneously. Most of the work in this area has been theoretical. This course acquaints students with that theoretical literature and helps them apply these theories in their empirical work.

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides. 

Find Books

UCB: Use OskiCat to find books related to your topic at UC Berkeley. Oskicat will show you where it's located, and will also show you the Library of Congress Subject Heading -- which can help you find material other relevant books.

UC: Not enough books  at Berkeley? Use Melvyl to find more books at other campuses in the UC system.  Clickon the REQUEST button (in the detailed view of a catalog record) to request the item through  Interlibrary Loan.

World: Still want more? You can search thousands of libraries through WorldCat on FirstSearch and then request the material through UC e-links or directly via Interlibrary Loan

Google Books: Library catalogs don't search inside of books. Google Books can help you identify the book you need, then click on "Find in a Library" to see if we have it.

Find Articles

There are hundreds of online databases that cover all kinds of material and all of the disciplines that are taught at Berkeley.  Some of the core databases for this class are listed below.

JSTOR: Education and Project MUSE: Education search and display the fulltext of highly respected scholarly academic journals -- and unlike most e-journals, JSTOR goes back to the very first volumes -- but it doesn't include the past three to five years.


Theory

Sometimes encyclopedias and handbooks can help you get an overview of a particular theory or theoretical approach, and will also provide citations for additional books and articles. Here are some that might be useful for this course:

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Connecting from Off Campus?

You can access UCB Library resources from off campus or via your laptop or other mobile device using one of two simple methods. (NOTE: Using EndNote? Use VPN, not the Proxy Server)

Proxy Server
After you make a one-time change in your web browser settings, the proxy server will ask you to log in with a CalNet ID or Library PIN when you click on the link to a licensed resource. See the setup instructions, FAQ, and Troubleshooting pages to configure your browser.

VPN (Virtual Private Network)
After you install and run the VPN "client" software on your computer, you can log in with a CalNet ID to establish a secure connection with the campus network.

Google Scholar and UC e-links

  1. Set up your proxy server access by following the directions at http://proxy.lib.berkeley.edu/. When you get to a point where you are accessing resources that the Library pays for, you will be prompted for your CalNet ID and password.
  2. Change your “Scholar Preferences.” Access these by clicking on the link next to the search box. 
  3. In search box next to "Library Links," type in University of California Berkeley and click on “Find Library”
  4. Check box next to "University of California Berkeley - UC-eLinks
  5. Click on "Save Preferences" at bottom of page

Power Searching

Power search features for most article databases:
  • Use synonyms -- there are many ways to express a concept (teenager or teenagers or adolescent)
  • Use truncation to get different forms of the word, for example teenage* will retrieve teenagers, teenager, teenaged, etc.
  • Use quotation marks when you want an "exact phrase"

A bit more complex -- but really powerful:
  • Use "controlled vocabulary" (also called descriptors or subject headings) if the database has them. The ERIC Thesaurus is a very powerful tool. You can browse the Thesaurus by category to get an overview of how the research is organized in a topic area, and to learn the terminology that the editors apply to describe what an article is "about".
  • Use the special "limits" or "fields" that the database offers. Many let you limit by language, ERIC also lets you limit by:
    • Educational Level -- are you interested in secondary? elementary? higher education?
    • Audience -- do you want articles oriented towards practitioners or researchers?
    • Publication Type -- do you want dissertations? books? journals? classroom guides

Citation Management Tools

Citation management tools help you manage your research, collect and cite sources, and create bibliographies in a variety of citation styles.  Each one has its strengths and weaknesses, but any are easier than doing it by hand! The Library offers workshops on Endnote, Zotero, and Refworks! Or contact your librarian for individual help.

  1. Zotero: A free plug-in that works with the Firefox browser, or with other browsers via a standalone version: keeps copies of what you find on the web, permits tagging, notation, full text searching of your library of resources, works with Word, and has a free web backup service (for up to 300 mb). The library has created this handy guide to using Zotero.
  2. RefWorks - free for UC Berkeley users. It allows you to create your own database by importing references and using them for footnotes and bibliographies. Use the RefWorks New User Form to sign up.
  3. EndNote: may be purchased from UC Berkeley's Software Central for about $80.

It's always good to double check the formatting -- sometimes the software doesn't get it quite right.

Importing from CSA to RefWorks

Importing from Social Services Abstracts (or any CSA database) into RefWorks

  1. Search CSA Social Services Abstracts.
  2. Select the desired references by checking the box to the left of each citation.
  3. After all the desired citations have been selected, click on RefWorks
  4. You will be asked if you want the records added, if so click on Export to RefWorks. (If you have a pop up blocker, it will then confirm that you do want to open RefWorks.)
  5. RefWorks then displays the last citations you added, and you can choose to add them to a specific folder . Or you can just leave them in the Last Imported folder. (If you want to create a new folder, just click on Folder and the drop down arrow will let you select make a new one.

RefWorks with Oskicat

Search OskiCat. Once you have records you want to export, if you are:

A. Viewing a list of results, check the box to the left of each record you wish to add to RefWorks, then click Save Selected Records, or

B. Viewing an individual record, click the Save Records button near the top of the window and then:

  1. Click the View Saved button near the top of the window
  2. Click Export Saved
  3. Select EndNote/RefWorks under Format of List
  4. Select Screen under Send List To
  5. Click Submit
  6. Use your browser’s Select All function, then Copy
  7. Open another browser window and access your RefWorks Account.
  8. Click References from the drop-down menu and select Import
  9. In the drop-down menu next to Import Filter/Data Source, choose Innovative Interfaces (EndNote/RefWorks Format)
  10. For Database, choose University of California, Berkeley
  11. In Import References into Folder, choose the desired folder, if you have already created a folder into which you want these references to import.  If not, make no selection here
  12. Click Import
  13. Select the radio button next to Import Data from the following Text.
  14.  Put your cursor in the box below Import Data from the following Text and select Edit > Paste in your browser.
  15. By default, all newly imported references appear in the Last Imported folder. Under View / Folders, select your folder to see the citations you just imported.  Note the UC-eLinks icon next to each reference.

Thanks to the Public Health Library for creating this guide!

Zotero Tips

If you've never used Zotero before, use the QuickStart Guide to get started.

Change your preferences if you want  Zotero to

To use Zotero to find specific articles in our library's databases, set up the Open URL resolver with this link: http://ucelinks.cdlib.org:8888/sfx_local? 

 

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