NATAMST R1B: Indigenous Knowledges and Philosophies in Practice

Ethnic Studies Library

Some of the books you find in OskiCat or Melvyl may list their location as "Native American Studies Stephens HallCollection." This means that they are located in the Ethnic Studies Library, on the first floor of Stephens Hall (map).The Ethnic Studies Library is organized into collections focusing on specific ethnic groups, to make browsing easier; look for the "Native American Studies" area when you enter the library, or ask a library staff member to point you in the right direction.

The Ethnic Studies library has more limited hours than Doe or Moffitt (open M-F 1-5 during the summer) and their borrowing periods are shorter, but they have a very specialized collection and helpful librarians who are experts in their fields. The Ethnic Studies Library has put together a useful guide on doing research in Native American studies.

Beyond the Web

"It's all free on the Internet, right? Why should I go through the library's website to find sources for my paper?"

Library logo

The Web is a great source for free, publicly available information. However, the Library pays for thousands of electronic books, journals, and other information resources that are available only to the campus community. Through the Library website, you can access hundreds of different licensed databases containing journal articles, electronic books, maps, images, government and legal information, current and historical newspapers, digitized primary sources, and more. 

You access these resources through the Internet, using a browser like Firefox, Chrome or Internet Explorer -- but these databases are not part of the free, public Web. Resources like Lexis-Nexis, Web of Science, Academic Search Complete, and ARTstor are "invisible" to Google. You will not see results from most library databases in the results of a Google search.

Want to find out more? Get started exploring the Library's electronic resources, or find out how to get access to licensed resources from off-campus.

Starting Points

1.  Read an introduction to the campus libraries for undergraduates.Campanile and Golden Gate Bridge

2.  Set up your computer for off campus access to library databases.

3.  Need a map of the campus libraries? Doe and Moffitt floor plans are here.

4.  Each library has its own hours and they may change on holidays and between semesters - click on the calendar for each library to view a month at a time.

5.  Information about citing your sources and links to guides for frequently used citation styles here.

Printing and Scanning in the Libraries

All libraries on campus are equipped with "bookscan stations," which allow you to:

  • scan documents and save them to a USB drive, or
  • scan documents and then send them to a printer.  You cannot email a scanned document from a bookscan station.

Scanning to a USB drive is free.  Moffitt Copy Center sells flash drives.

Scanning documents to print is 8 cents a page (color printing: 60 cents a page).picture of open book

In order to send documents to the printer from any of the public computers in the libraries, you must have the following:

  • A document that's on the Web or attached to your email (the public computers in the libraries will not open files from a USB or other drive)
  • A Cal 1 Card, with money loaded onto the debit account (go here to make a deposit to your Cal 1 Card account).  
    This is not the same as meal plan points! Your Cal 1 Card debit account is a separate fund on your card.

Have more questions? There's more info here.

Last Update: September 05, 2013 17:36