ENGLISH 190: American Captivities

Research Advisory Service

Research Advisory Service for Cal Undergraduates

Book a 30-minute appointment with a librarian who will help refine and focus research inquiries, identify useful online and print sources, and develop search strategies for humanities and social sciences topics (examples of research topics).

Schedule, view, edit or cancel your appointment online (CalNetID required)

This service is for Cal undergraduates only. Graduate students and faculty should contact the library liaison to their department or program for specialized reference consultations.

Ask a Librarian 24/7 Chat


Javascript required to chat

You do allow embedded content.

Journal Tips

Use E-Journal titles A-Z for the widest coverage of electronic journals.  Most are licensed and some are open access, that is, freely available.

When checking OskiCat or Melvyl to see if Berkeley subscribes to a journal, use the journal's title in the search and not the author or title of the article you want.  Oski does not list individual articles, and Melvyl has only a few. 

When the Oski record indicates that the library has e-access through several sources, that information lets you know that the title is important.

Older issues of paper journals are stored in NRLF; use Request in Oski to ask that journals be brought back to campus for you to use or to have NRLF staff scan the article you need and email it to you.

To find articles about your subject, use indexes.  The key index for literature is the Modern Language Association International Bibliography (MLAIB). 

JSTOR is a large database of over a 1000 scholarly journals, but publishers are allowed to embargo new issues from a time period of 1-10 years, so the newest issues may not be available. 

Project Muse offers newer issues of articles published in nearly 400 not-for-profit and scholarly journals.  Some journals offer all issues published while others offer only the newer ones.

Style Manuals

When preparing a bibliography, you’ll want to establish which style sheet your professor wishes you to use.  For undergraduate English classes, the preferred style sheet is often the Modern Language Association’s MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers.  This publication also contains valuable information about the entire research process from choosing a topic, to avoiding plagiarism, to formatting the paper. 

 MLA handbook for Writers of Research Papers. 7th edition. New York : Modern Language Association of America, 2009.
Doe Reference Reference Hall LB2369 .G53 2009
Main Gardner Stacks LB2369 .G53 2009

 Purdue University’s Online Writing Lab created the MLA Formatting and Style Guide, which is quite useful. 

Other common style manuals:

Columbia Guide to Online Style (UCB-only access)
Janice R. Walker and Todd Taylor. 2nd ed. NY: Columbia Univ. Press. 2006.


The Chicago Manual of Style (UCB-only access)
15th ed. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2003. Searchable, online version of the Chicago Manual of Style (15th edition).

Cite Right: A Quick Guide to Citation Styles--MLA, APA, Chicago, the Sciences, Professions, and More (UCB-only access) Charles Lipson. Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2006.

 

This guide has been archived

Please note: this course guide was created during a previous semester, and is no longer being actively maintained. For a list of current course guides, please see http://lib.berkeley.edu/alacarte/course-guides.

Last Update: April 04, 2014 11:53