LEGALST R1B: Equal Rights in a Changing Society

Where's the PDF?

Many article databases contain information about articles (citations or abstracts), not the entire text of the article.  Once you've used an article database to find articles on your topic, you may need to use this button:uc-eLinks button in order to locate and read the full text of the article. The UC-eLinks button appears in nearly all the databases available from the UCB Library website.

UC-eLinks will link you to the online full text of an article if UCB has paid for online access; otherwise, UC-eLinks will help you locate a print copy on the shelf in the library. If UCB doesn't own the article in print or online format, UC-eLinks can also help you order a copy from another library.

For more information, watch this video tutorial (about 4 min.)

You can also set up UC-eLinks to work with Google Scholar.  For more information, watch this 40-second demo.

What is Peer Review?

Your instructor may want you to use "peer reviewed" articles as sources for your paper. Or you may be asked to find picture of thinking student"academic," "scholarly," or "refereed" articles. What do these terms mean?

Let's start with the terms academic and scholarly, which are synonyms. An academic or scholarly journal is one intended for a specialized or expert audience. Journals like this exist in the sciences, social sciences, and humanities. Examples include Nature, Journal of Sociology, and Journal of American Studies. Scholarly/academic journals exist to help scholars communicate their latest research and ideas to each other; they are written "by experts for experts."

Most scholarly/academic journals are peer reviewed; another synonym for peer reviewed is refereed. Before an article is published in a peer-reviewed journal, it's evaluated for quality and significance by several specialists in the same field, who are "peers" of the author. The article may go through several revisions before it finally reaches publication.

Magazines like Time or Scientific American, newspapers, (most) books, government documents, and websites are not peer-reviewed, though they may be thoroughly edited and fact-checked. Articles in scholarly journals (in printed format or online) usually ARE peer-reviewed.

How can you tell if an article is both scholarly and peer-reviewed?

Read more

Scholarly Journals & More

These are the recommended article databases for students in LS R1B; you can also choose from a list of all available databases for LGBT issues or for law and legal studies.

  • Academic Search Complete
    A recommended starting point for research. Indexes articles in all subject areas from more than 10,900 scholarly journals and popular magazines. Full text is included for many articles.
  • America: History and Life
    Indexes over 2,000 journals published worldwide on the history of the US and Canada from prehistory to the present.
  • Hein Online
    Provides full text to the early issues of many legal journals and law reviews, the Federal Register (1936-six months ago), US Supreme Court Library (1754-present) and treaties and agreements. Note: after authenticating with your CalNet ID and passphrase, you will need to click the "Log in to Hein Online" link for full access.
  • PAIS International
    Indexes books, journals, government documents, statistical directories, grey literature, research reports, conference reports, and web sources related to public policy, politics, economics, and social issues worldwide.
  • Sociological Abstracts
    Indexes over 1,900 journals, books, dissertations, and reviews in the social sciences on sociological topics as well as selected anthropology, criminology, demography, law, social psychology, and urban development.

Newspapers & Magazines

Most of these databases contain the full text of articles from newspapers and magazines. If no full text is available, look for uc-elinks button (the UC-eLinks button) to see your options for accessing the entire article.

  • Access World News
    Provides full-text information and perspectives from over 600 U.S. and over 700 international sources. Offers strong regional coverage, indexing more than California newspapers such as Contra Costa Times (1995-current), Sacramento Bee (1984-current), San Francisco Chronicle (1985-current), and San Jose Mercury News (1985-current). You can limit your search to California sources, U.S. sources, or world news sources.
  • LexisNexis Academic
    Includes over 6,000 individual titles of international, national and local newspapers and wire services; radio and television transcripts; and business, medical, industry, and legislative magazines, journals, and newsletters. Wide geographic coverage and translations from foreign-language sources, as well as news services like the Associated Press, Agence France Press, El Pais and Xinhua (New China) News Agency.
  • Alternative Press Index
    Search Alternative Press Index (1991-present) plus Alternative Press Archive (1969-1990). Includes more than 450 alternative, radical, and left magazines, newsletters, and journals in North America which report and analyze issues of cultural, economic, political, and social change. Approximately 90% of publications included are not indexed elsewhere. Indexes editorials, regular columns, essays, fiction; speeches, interviews, statistics, reprints; bibliographies, biographies, obituaries, memoirs; and reviews.
  • LGBT Life
    Indexes more than 120 Gay Lesbian Bisexual Transgender (GLBT)-specific core periodicals and over 200 GLBT-specific core books and reference works. The product also contains data mined from over 40 priority periodicals and over 1,400 select titles. Also provides references to grey literature, newsletters, case studies, speeches, etc.
Last Update: May 15, 2012 15:01