Animals in the Library

Content section: 

Because animals in the library are incompatible with the essential purpose of the library to serve as a quiet research and study facility, it is the library's policy not to allow persons to bring animals into the library with the exception of a service animal accompanying a person with a disability.

A service animal is any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability. In other words, not only must the service animal be a dog, but the dog must be trained to perform specific tasks – “the provision of emotional support, well-being, comfort, or companionship do not constitute work or tasks for the purposes of this definition.”

While on University property a service animal shall be under the control of its handler. Usually this means the service animal must have a harness, leash, or other tether. Anytime a service dog is behaving in a manner incompatible with the essential purposes of the library, the library will immediately require that the service dog be brought into conformity or leave the library.

Incompatible behavior includes:

  • barking
  • urinating/pooping on floor
  • running away or otherwise leaving the side of the owner
  • biting or other threatening actions such as growling, teeth bared, lunging on others besides animal owner
  • damaging property of University or others

Anyone bringing a service dog into a library may be asked the following questions:

  1. Is this animal required because of a disability?
  2. What work or task is this animal trained to perform?
Questions? Ask Us!