Re: DVD Cometh

stephen O'Riordan (soriordan@ucsd.edu)
Thu, 4 Nov 1999 08:56:16 -0800 (PST)

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Gary's numbers are similar to UC San Diego's. DVD is in heavy demand & use
for
film studies. Faculty want DVD for in class use, for student analysis & for
reserves. Classic's such Battleship Potemkin, Birth of a Nation & Man W/ a
Movie Camera have not left the DVD players ( in Reserves ) since the quarter
began. We are buying more DVD players as a write. I believe we have 6 now.
This being said, we still play beta & plenty of 16mm as well.

Stephen

At 12:33 PM 11/2/99 -0800, you wrote:
>At UCB we have about 2700 international cinema titles (out of a total
>collection of about 9000 titles). Use of the cinema constitutes at least
>40% of our total circulation...most likely higher. UCB has a middling film
>studies program...the balance of use of the cinema collection is by ethnic
>studies, American Studies, Women's Studies, foreign language departments,
>history and political science. DVD is definitely on our horizon.
>
>Gary Handman
>
>
>
>
>At 11:32 AM 11/02/1999 -0800, you wrote:
>>We are a medium-sized state university, California State
>>University Sacramento. Our collection consists of about 4500
>>video titles of which about 10%, or 450, are "movies" -
>>theatrical releases. If 50 of those titles are used as
>>curriculum support, I'd be surprised. The balance of our
>>circulation of movies is pleasure viewing by students, staff and
>>faculty. I haven't had a request yet for DVD. Unless or until
>>educational titles are released in DVD format, I really can't
>>make a case for owning DVD equipment or titles. Am I the only
>>one who feels this way?
>>
>>Date: Tue, 2 Nov 1999 10:30:03
>>-0800 (PST) Reply-to: videolib@library.berkeley.edu From:
>> Rick Provine <rep3s@virginia.edu> To: Multiple
>>recipients of list <videolib@library.berkeley.edu> Subject: Re:
>>DVD Cometh
>>
>>I think this will go much like the laserdisc market went, only better.
>>Laser never caught on as a consumer format, but was absolutely necessary
>>for collecting feature film in something like its original form
>>(widescreen, decent audio, decent picture quality, commentary, etc.) DVD
>>as least has the advantage of more widespread consumer acceptance, due
>>mostly to the industry's unprecedented support across companies for the
>>format (Circuit City excepted).
>>
>>If you want to collect feature film, then DVD is an absulute must due to
>>its features and picture quality. Because of the large install base of
>>DVD-ROm drives, there is a broader acceptance of the format. The rap on
>>laser was that it couldn't record. That was set up as a condition for the
>>success of any new format. But most people never record with their VCR's.
>>And they are now realizing this.
>>
>>We may never see the more esoteric titles on DVD, but VHS isn't going away.
>> Multiple formats is part of doing media these days, and why we all have
>jobs.
>>
>>Ramble ramble....
>>
>>At 08:46 AM 11/2/99 -0800, Gary Handman wrote:
>>>Hi folks!
>>>
>>>In my frantic desire to justify buying ten new DVD players ("cheapie" Sony
>>>DVP S330's about $250 a pop...if you care), I began nosing around industry
>>>other trade sources in search of indicators of the viability of this
>>>medium. Some interesting stats from an Oct. 18, 1999 Phillips Businss
>>>Information report:
>>>
>>>Projected growth of DVD Content and Devices:
>>>
>>>DVD Discs in U.S. and Europe for '99 -- 77 million units (sold)
>>>DVD Discs expected by 20002 -- more than 2 billion units (sold)
>>>Worldwide DVD Devices for 99' -- 17 million (sold)(I think this may include
>>>DVD-ROM drives as well as DVD players)
>>>Worldwide DVD Devices expected by 2005 - 144 million (sold)
>>>
>>>The August 16, 1999 Phillips report quotes the International Recording
>>>Media Association in its projection that "there will be nearly 25 million
>>>DVD players and a billions discs sold worldwide by 2003
>>>
>>>
>>>The Phillips report for May 14, 1999 indicated the following projections:
>>>
>>>US DVD-ROM Title releases (I think this includes both movies and games?)
>>>
>>>1998 - 100
>>>1999 - 750
>>>2000 - 2000
>>>2001 - 4000
>>>2002 - 7000
>>>20003 11,000
>>>
>>>Still, one wonders how much of the current body of analog
>>>video--theatrical, documentary, educational,etc.--is likely to make it over
>>>the fence into digitaldom... Somehow, I have this continuing fear that a
>>>lot of wonderful and weird will never make the transition...It occurs to me
>>>that, like Neanderthal and Homo Sapiens, we're likely to see the
>>>evolutionary dead-end and the evolutionary vanguard existing in uneasy
>>>tandem for some time to come.
>>>
>>>gary handman
>>>
>>>
>>>Gary Handman
>>>Director
>>>Media Resources Center
>>>Moffitt Library
>>>UC Berkeley 94720-6000
>>>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
>>>
>>>"Everything wants to become television" (James Ulmer -- Teletheory)
>>
>>________________________________________
>>Rick E. Provine
>>Director for Media||Robertson Media Center
>>Clemons Library||University of Virginia
>>VOICE 804.924.8814||FAX 804.924.7468
>>provine@virginia.edu
>>www.lib.virginia.edu/clemons/RMC
>>________________________________________
>>
>>
>>
>Gary Handman
>Director
>Media Resources Center
>Moffitt Library
>UC Berkeley 94720-6000
>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
>
>"Everything wants to become television" (James Ulmer -- Teletheory)
>
Stephen O'Riordan
Film & Video Library
University of Calif. San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla Ca 92023-0175Q
phone: (619) 534-7981
fax: (619) 534-0189
e-mail: soriordan@ucsd.edu
http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/fvl/FVLPAGE.HTM
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Gary's numbers are similar to UC San Diego's.  DVD is in heavy demand & use for film studies.  Faculty want DVD for  in class use, for student analysis & for reserves.  Classic's such Battleship Potemkin, Birth of a Nation & Man W/ a Movie Camera have not left the DVD players (  in Reserves ) since the quarter began.  We are buying more  DVD players as a write.  I believe we have 6 now.  This being said, we still play beta & plenty of 16mm as well.

Stephen



At 12:33 PM 11/2/99 -0800, you wrote:
>At UCB we have about 2700 international cinema titles (out of a total
>collection of about 9000 titles).  Use of the cinema constitutes at least
>40% of our total circulation...most likely higher.  UCB has a middling film
>studies program...the balance of use of the cinema collection is by ethnic
>studies, American Studies, Women's Studies, foreign language departments,
>history and political science.  DVD is definitely on our horizon.
>
>Gary Handman
>
>
>
>
>At 11:32 AM 11/02/1999 -0800, you wrote:
>>We are a medium-sized state university, California State
>>University Sacramento.  Our collection consists of about 4500
>>video titles of which about 10%, or 450, are "movies" -
>>theatrical releases.  If 50 of those titles are used as
>>curriculum support, I'd be surprised.  The balance of our
>>circulation of movies is pleasure viewing by students, staff and
>>faculty.  I haven't had a request yet for DVD.  Unless or until
>>educational titles are released in DVD format, I really can't
>>make a case for owning DVD equipment or titles.  Am I the only
>>one who feels this way? 
>>
>>Date:          Tue, 2 Nov 1999 10:30:03
>>-0800 (PST) Reply-to:      videolib@library.berkeley.edu From:       
>>  Rick Provine <rep3s@virginia.edu> To:            Multiple
>>recipients of list <videolib@library.berkeley.edu> Subject:       Re:
>>DVD Cometh
>>
>>I think this will go much like the laserdisc market went, only better.
>>Laser never caught on as a consumer format, but was absolutely necessary
>>for collecting feature film in something like its original form
>>(widescreen, decent audio, decent picture quality, commentary, etc.)  DVD
>>as least has the advantage of more widespread consumer acceptance, due
>>mostly to the industry's unprecedented support across companies for the
>>format (Circuit City excepted). 
>>
>>If you want to collect feature film, then DVD is an absulute must due to
>>its features and picture quality.  Because of the large install base of
>>DVD-ROm drives, there is a broader acceptance of the format.  The rap on
>>laser was that it couldn't record.  That was set up as a condition for the
>>success of any new format.  But most people never record with their VCR's.
>>And they are now realizing this.
>>
>>We may never see the more esoteric titles on DVD, but VHS isn't going away.
>> Multiple formats is part of doing media these days, and why we all have
>jobs.
>>
>>Ramble ramble....
>>
>>At 08:46 AM 11/2/99 -0800, Gary Handman wrote:
>>>Hi folks!
>>>
>>>In my frantic desire to justify buying ten new DVD players ("cheapie" Sony
>>>DVP S330's about $250 a pop...if you care), I began nosing around industry
>>>other trade sources in search of indicators of the viability of this
>>>medium.  Some interesting stats from an Oct. 18, 1999 Phillips Businss
>>>Information report:
>>>
>>>Projected growth of DVD Content and Devices:
>>>
>>>DVD Discs in U.S. and Europe for '99 -- 77 million units (sold)
>>>DVD Discs expected by 20002 -- more than 2 billion units (sold)
>>>Worldwide DVD Devices for 99' -- 17 million (sold)(I think this may include
>>>DVD-ROM drives as well as DVD players)
>>>Worldwide DVD Devices expected by 2005 - 144 million (sold)
>>>
>>>The August 16, 1999 Phillips report quotes the International Recording
>>>Media Association in its projection that "there will be nearly 25 million
>>>DVD players and a billions discs sold worldwide by 2003
>>>
>>>
>>>The Phillips report for May 14, 1999 indicated the following projections:
>>>
>>>US DVD-ROM Title releases (I think this includes both movies and games?)
>>>
>>>1998 - 100
>>>1999 - 750
>>>2000 - 2000
>>>2001 - 4000
>>>2002 - 7000
>>>20003 11,000
>>>
>>>Still, one wonders how much of the current body of analog
>>>video--theatrical, documentary, educational,etc.--is likely to make it over
>>>the fence into digitaldom...  Somehow, I have this continuing fear that a
>>>lot of wonderful and weird will never make the transition...It occurs to me
>>>that, like Neanderthal and Homo Sapiens, we're likely to see the
>>>evolutionary dead-end and the evolutionary vanguard existing in uneasy
>>>tandem for some time to come.
>>>
>>>gary handman
>>>
>>>
>>>Gary Handman
>>>Director
>>>Media Resources Center
>>>Moffitt Library
>>>UC Berkeley 94720-6000
>>>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
>>>
>>>"Everything wants to become television" (James Ulmer -- Teletheory)
>>
>>________________________________________
>>Rick E. Provine
>>Director for Media||Robertson Media Center
>>Clemons Library||University of Virginia
>>VOICE 804.924.8814||FAX 804.924.7468
>>provine@virginia.edu
>>www.lib.virginia.edu/clemons/RMC
>>________________________________________
>>
>>
>>
>Gary Handman
>Director
>Media Resources Center
>Moffitt Library
>UC Berkeley 94720-6000
>http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC
>
>"Everything wants to become television" (James Ulmer -- Teletheory)
>
Stephen O'Riordan
Film & Video Library
University of Calif. San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla Ca 92023-0175Q
phone: (619) 534-7981
fax:       (619) 534-0189
e-mail:  soriordan@ucsd.edu
http://orpheus.ucsd.edu/fvl/FVLPAGE.HTM
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