Re: DVD Cometh

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Wed, 3 Nov 1999 10:22:45 -0800 (PST)

Video streaming is the process of digitally encoding/compressing a video
(turning the analog information on a videotape into a digital signal)**,
mounting this digital information on a server, and making the digital video
files available to remote users (generally via a web site). The user
(client) goes to a web site and clicks on the "button" which is linked to
the digital video files. The video image is "streamed"--delivered in real
time--to the end-user's machine. Receiving the image requires that the
client have the appropriate player software on his/her machine (the most
common video players are downloadable for free). (for an example of this
stuff, you can check out UCB MRC's online video site at:
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/onlinemediamenu.html)

The problem with video delivery on the web at present is the fact that the
bandwidth and computer speed required for delivering and receiving
decent-looking images are beyond the capabilities of most modem users.
It's true that it's fairly easy to deliver and receive a pathetically small
and jerky little postage-stamp-sized video images...once you attempt to
deliver a bigger, higher-quality image, things melt down pretty quickly.
All this will, of course, change at some point...my guess is within the
next 5-7 years.

Don't sell off your VCR yet! And don't discount the long-term importance
of DVD (or someother stand-alone video medium) in the marketplace and in
libraries.

**This process is generally accomplished using commercial software
(RealAudio/Video, StreamWorks, et al) and a suite of hardware required to
capture/digitally encode image and sound (video capture board, sound
capture board, etc.)

At 08:44 AM 11/03/1999 -0800, you wrote:
>Excuse my ignorance but what is video streaming?
>
>
>Nancy Maxwell
>
>
>
Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley 94720-6000
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"Everything wants to become television" (James Ulmer -- Teletheory)