Re: History of the Movies??

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Wed, 11 Nov 1998 09:14:41 -0800 (PST)

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Sal...

You might want to poke around the MRC Film History list at:
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/FilmonVideoVid.html

We don't include distributors in these records, but if you see something
that looks interesting you can give me a call (or email) and I'll provide
the info.

I notice that Films for the Humanities has a (new?) series on the history
of cinema:

=46ilm History

The Lumi=E8re brothers and
Thomas Edison would be shocked if
they could see how far the
medium created with the invention
of the movie camera has
evolved over the years. This program
examines the history of film,
from its beginnings in the late
19th century to the invention
of VCRs. Filmmaking's roots as an
entertainment and storytelling
medium are examined, along
with the emergence of
Hollywood, the studio star system, and
birth of the talkies. Film
industry regulation, including
censorship, is discussed along
with the blacklist and
competition from television.
(29 minutes, color)

Haven't seen this...unlikely that 29 minutes is gonna make it to tell the
full story, though.

=46ilms for the Humanities also offers a couple of other possible titles I
haven't yet seen:

The Cinematograph

The many antecedents
of the cinematograph; the
films of Lumi=E8re an=
d
M=E9li=E8s; and technological
advances in the art
of film.
(15 min.)

The Dawn of the Eye: The History of Film and TV News

This six-part series
traces the evolution of film and
television broadcast
journalism and the impact
they have had on our
perception of world events.
47-51 minutes each.

Cable Ace Award,
Best Documentary Limited
Series, Domestic
Division

The History and Future of Television

This program
recaptures the spirit of the early
days of television
with previously unseen footage. It
also charts the
technical history of TV, provides a
probing look at its
future, and asks who, among
modern communication
innovators, will guide the
medium into the 21st
century? Original BBC
broadcast title: TV
Is Dead, Long Live TV. (50 min.)

History Through a Lens: 1894-1919

The beginnings of
the filmed-news industry from
the development of
the movie camera by the
Lumi=E8re brothers in
1895 through the popularity
of newsreels.

Good luck!

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"You are looking into the mind of home video. It is innocent, it is aimless=
,
it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld
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Sal...

You might want to poke around the MRC Film History list at:

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC/FilmonVideoVid.html

We don't include distributors in these records, but if you see
something that looks interesting you can give me a call (or email) and
I'll provide the info.

I notice that Films for the Humanities has a (new?) series on the
history of cinema:

<bold>Film History=20

</bold> The Lumi=E8re
brothers and Thomas Edison would be shocked if

they could see how far the
medium created with the invention

of the movie camera has
evolved over the years. This program

examines the history of
film, from its beginnings in the late

19th century to the
invention of VCRs. Filmmaking's roots as an

entertainment and
storytelling medium are examined, along

with the emergence of
Hollywood, the studio star system, and

birth of the talkies. Film
industry regulation, including

censorship, is discussed
along with the blacklist and

competition from
television. (29 minutes, color)

Haven't seen this...unlikely that 29 minutes is gonna make it to tell
the full story, though.

=46ilms for the Humanities also offers a couple of other possible titles
I haven't yet seen:

<bold>The Cinematograph=20

</bold> The many
antecedents of the cinematograph; the

films of Lumi=E8re
and M=E9li=E8s; and technological

advances in the
art of film.=20

(15 min.)

<bold> The Dawn of the Eye: The History of Film and TV News

</bold> This
six-part series traces the evolution of film and

television
broadcast journalism and the impact

they have had on
our perception of world events.

47-51 minutes
each.

Cable Ace Award,
Best Documentary Limited

Series, Domestic
Division

<bold>The History and Future of Television=20

</bold> This
program recaptures the spirit of the early

days of
television with previously unseen footage. It

also charts the
technical history of TV, provides a

probing look at
its future, and asks who, among

modern
communication innovators, will guide the

medium into the
21st century? Original BBC

broadcast title:
TV Is Dead, Long Live TV. (50 min.)

<bold>History Through a Lens: 1894-1919=20

</bold> The
beginnings of the filmed-news industry from

the development
of the movie camera by the

Lumi=E8re brothers
in 1895 through the popularity

of newsreels.

Good luck!

<color><param>1E1E,1B1B,1B1B</param>

Gary Handman

Director

Media Resources Center

Moffitt Library

UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000

510-643-8566

ghandman@library.berkeley.edu

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

</color><color><param>FFFF,0000,0000</param>"You are looking into the mind=
of home video. It is innocent, it is aimless,

it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld</color>

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