Fwd: Communications-related Headlines for 9/4/98

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Tue, 8 Sep 1998 10:23:17 -0700

>
>INTERNET OVER CABLE: DEFINING THE FUTURE IN TERMS OF THE PAST
>Issue: Cable/Internet
>FCC Staff Working Paper on Regulatory Categories and the InternetThe FCC's
>Office of Plans and Policy (OPP) today released a staff working paper
>analyzing the policy issues raised by the delivery of Internet-based
>services over cable television systems. OPP Working Paper No. 30, "Internet
>Over Cable: Defining the Future in Terms of the Past," was written by
>Barbara Esbin, Associate Bureau Chief of the Cable Services Bureau, in
>conjunction with OPP. Periodically, OPP issues working papers on emerging
>areas in communications; these papers represent individual views and are not
>an official statement by the FCC or any FCC commissioner.[SOURCE: FCC]
><http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/OPP/News_Releases/1998/nrop8001.html>
><http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/OPP/working_papers/oppwp30.wp>,
><http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/OPP/working_papers/oppwp30.pdf>
>
FACED WITH 'CONVERGENCE,' FCC TAKES CLOSER LOOK AT INTERNET ACCESS VIA CABLE
Issue: Cable/Regulation
Is Internet over cable a "cable service," a "telecommunications service" or
an information service"? A working paper released by the FCC last week
begins to address this question and how the agency should approach
regulation. The paper is meant to begin a discussion between branches of the
government and industry. "The whole point," said the paper's author, "is to
say, hey, we've got this problem, and it's a big problem. When you have the
capability the Internet provides -- now you can do almost anything over one
medium -- you have to start thinking which rules are applicable, or whether
any of our rules are applicable at all." [Get a copy of the paper at
<http://www.fcc.gov/Bureaus/OPP/working_papers/oppwp30.wp>]
[SOURCE: Wall Street Journal (B8), AUTHOR: John Simons]
<http://wsj.com/>

Seeking Revolutionaries at Digital Art Conference
Issue: Arts
At a time when electronic art is struggling to penetrate the fortress of the
cultural establishment, the theme of the International Symposium on
Electronic Art is "Revolution." (Well, you know, everyone wants to paint the
world) About 700 artists and academics, plus the occasional capitalist tool,
are expected to attend the ninth ISEA, where they will hear dozens of
lectures on topics such as "Computer-Generated Photography and the
Neoclassical Sensibility," "Why Bring the Virtual World Onto the Classical
Stage?" and "Things That Go Ping." "If there is a revolution happening, it's
a much less visible and celebrated revolution" than the social revolutions
of the 60's, Eddie Berg, director of Liverpool's Foundation for Art &
Creative Technology said. "I think we're living through a period of
self-doubt and questioning and uncertainty, which is reflected by artists as
well. People say this is pre-millennial tension, but it's been there for a
while." Some related URLs: <http://www.isea98.org/>,
<http://www.fact.co.uk/>, <http://www.net-art.org/>, and
<http://www.isea.qc.ca/>
[SOURCE: New York Times (CyberTimes), AUTHOR: Matthew Mirapaul
<mirapaul@nytimes.com>]
<http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/98/09/cyber/artsatlarge/03artsatlarge.html>

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"You are looking into the mind of home video. It is innocent, it is aimless,
it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld