Re[2]: Videos on slavery

Agee, Jane (agee@mail.lib.duke.edu)
Tue, 07 Jul 98 09:58:13 est

Gary,
Who distributes "African Burial Ground"?
Thanks,
Jane Agee
_______________________________________________________________________________
Subject: Re: Videos on slavery
From: videolib@library.berkeley.edu at BITNET/INTERNET
Date: 7/6/98 4:56 PM

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Susan...

A few tapes which pop into mind:

The African Burial Ground: An American Discovery.
Explores the history and archeological excavation of a burial ground for
African slaves discovered in lower Manhattan Island, New York, during
construction of a Federal office building in the summer of 1991. Relates
also the effect of the discovery on understanding the role of
Afro-Americans in colonial American life. 1994. 116 min.

Almost Down to the Shore: African American Families During Emancipation.
Letters, diary entries, affidavits, etc. of persons associated with the
emancipation of slavery read aloud; accompanied by photographs. 35 min.

Art of Darkness.
The slaves of the Caribbean contributed not only to the wealth of their
masters, but also to the cultural heritage of the British Empire.
Documented through letters, paintings and poetry, the eighteenth century
is shown to be both an age of high culture and of cruelty. Film shows how
the art of the period romanticized the servitude of the plantation blacks as
they were depicted as precious, exotic ornaments, even as they were being
brutalized in real life. 52 min.

Digging for Slaves.
Provides many fascinating and surprising details at excavations of
18th-century slave quarters on Middleburg Plantation near
Charleston; at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson, whose
slave holdings seem so irreconcilable with his expressed views on
human freedom; and at Colonial Williamsburg, which until recently
suppressed information about the lives of the slaves, who made up
over half the town's population. 50 min.

Flight to Freedom.
Between 1790 and 1860, thousands of slaves fled the South for
liberation on the "Underground Railroad". In addition to examining
archival photographs, records and artifacts and interviews with
national experts and descendants of slaves, conductors, and
abolitionists, this program includes examples of spirituals sung by
slaves as part of the "code" system, and visits homes which were
used as shelters. The program highlights Rochester, New York,
which was at the heart of the railroad, where passengers were
hidden by Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman
and others. 120 min.

Frederick Douglass: When the Lion Wrote History.
Archival materials and autobiographical writings are used to present
the life story of Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave whose freedom
was bought by supporters he met on a speaking tour in England,
who became a journalist, publisher, diplomat and a passionate
leader in the early fight for civil rights. 90 min.

On My Own: The Traditions of Daisy Turner.
Presents the life of a daughter of a former slave, 102-year-old Daisy
Turner. She recalls childhood incidents and her father's Civil War
experiences and talks about life in her homestead in Vermont. Folklorist
Jane Beck fills in details about traditions preserved in the Turner family.
28 min.

Roots of Resistance: A Story of the Underground Railroad.
Recounts the story of the underground railroad through narratives of
escaped slaves. Includes interviews with descendants of slaves and slave
holders of Somerset Place, a plantation in North Carolina, who describe
the personal danger and terrible risk involved in each slave's departure.
58 min.

Sankofa.
Sankofa is an Akan word that means, "We must go back and reclaim our
past so we can move forward; so we understand why and how we came to
be who we are today." Written, directed and produced by Ethiopian-born
filmmaker Haile Gerima, SANKOFA is a powerful film about Maafa-the
African holocaust. Done from an African/African-American perspective,
this story is a vastly different one from the generally distorted
representations of African people that Hollywood gives us. This
revolutionary feature film connects enslaved black people with their
African past and culture. It empowers Black people on the screen by
showing how African peoples' desire for freedom made them resist, fight
back, and conspire against their enslavers, overseers and collective past
through the vision on Mona, who visits her ancestral experience on a new
world planation as Shola. We share the life she endures as a slave and
experiences her growing consciousness and transformation [description
from web site]. 1993. 125 min.

A Son of Africa.
A docudrama based on the book, The Interesting Narrative of the Life of
Oloudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vaasa the African, which was the first
influential slave autobiography. When it was published in 1789, it fueled a
growing anti-slavery movement in the U.S. and England. This production
employs dramatic reconstruction, archival material and interviews with
scholars. Equiano's narrative begins in the West African village where he
was kidnapped into slavery in 1756. He was shipped to a Virginia
plantation and then later sold again to a British naval officer. Here he
learned to read and write, became a skilled trader, eventually bought his
freedom and married into English society where he became a leading
abolitionist. 28 min.

Souls of Passage.
A film based on an exhibition of the excavated Henrietta Marie, a slave
ship which sank off the Florida coast in 1700. The piece traces the
Henrietta Marie's trip--both the route the slave ship took and the voyage
the exhibit made in its four year tour. Provides fascinating historical
evidence of the slave trade in 17th century America, the conditions the
slaves endured and the impact the exhibit had on current day North
Carolina residents. Based on the exhibit: "A Slave ship speaks: the wreck
of the Henrietta Marie" sponsored by the Mel Fisher Maritime Heritage
Society. Slave narrations from the Federal Writers Project. 1996.

Unearthing the Slave Trade.
On the eve of the American Revolution, New York City had the largest
number of enslaved Africans of any colonial settlement outside Charleston.
Though this has seldom been acknowledged, African labor was essential
in the building of New York. Today, archeological excavation of sites on
both sides of the Atlantic is bringing to light aspects of the slave trade
long buried in the liberal minds of those north of the Mason-Dixon line.
28 min.

If any of these look hot, let me know and I'll send along distributor info.

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"You are looking into the mind of home video. It is innocent, it is aimless,
it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld
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Susan...

A few tapes which pop into mind:

<bold>The African Burial Ground: An American Discovery.

</bold>Explores the history and archeological excavation of a burial
ground for

African slaves discovered in lower Manhattan Island, New York, during

construction of a Federal office building in the summer of 1991.
Relates

also the effect of the discovery on understanding the role of

Afro-Americans in colonial American life. 1994. 116 min.

<bold>Almost Down to the Shore: African American Families During
Emancipation.

</bold>Letters, diary entries, affidavits, etc. of persons associated
with the

emancipation of slavery read aloud; accompanied by photographs. 35
min.

<bold>Art of Darkness.

</bold>The slaves of the Caribbean contributed not only to the wealth
of their

masters, but also to the cultural heritage of the British Empire.

Documented through letters, paintings and poetry, the eighteenth
century

is shown to be both an age of high culture and of cruelty. Film shows
how

the art of the period romanticized the servitude of the plantation
blacks as

they were depicted as precious, exotic ornaments, even as they were
being

brutalized in real life. 52 min.

<bold>Digging for Slaves.

</bold>Provides many fascinating and surprising details at excavations
of

18th-century slave quarters on Middleburg Plantation near

Charleston; at Monticello, the home of Thomas Jefferson, whose

slave holdings seem so irreconcilable with his expressed views on

human freedom; and at Colonial Williamsburg, which until recently

suppressed information about the lives of the slaves, who made up

over half the town's population. 50 min.

<bold>Flight to Freedom.

</bold>Between 1790 and 1860, thousands of slaves fled the South for

liberation on the "Underground Railroad". In addition to examining

archival photographs, records and artifacts and interviews with

national experts and descendants of slaves, conductors, and

abolitionists, this program includes examples of spirituals sung by

slaves as part of the "code" system, and visits homes which were

used as shelters. The program highlights Rochester, New York,

which was at the heart of the railroad, where passengers were

hidden by Frederick Douglass, Susan B. Anthony, Harriet Tubman

and others. 120 min.

<bold>Frederick Douglass: When the Lion Wrote History.

</bold>Archival materials and autobiographical writings are used to
present

the life story of Frederick Douglass, an escaped slave whose freedom

was bought by supporters he met on a speaking tour in England,

who became a journalist, publisher, diplomat and a passionate

leader in the early fight for civil rights. 90 min.

<bold>On My Own: The Traditions of Daisy Turner.

</bold>Presents the life of a daughter of a former slave, 102-year-old
Daisy

Turner. She recalls childhood incidents and her father's Civil War

experiences and talks about life in her homestead in Vermont.
Folklorist

Jane Beck fills in details about traditions preserved in the Turner
family.

28 min.

<bold>Roots of Resistance: A Story of the Underground Railroad.

</bold>Recounts the story of the underground railroad through
narratives of

escaped slaves. Includes interviews with descendants of slaves and
slave

holders of Somerset Place, a plantation in North Carolina, who
describe

the personal danger and terrible risk involved in each slave's
departure.

58 min.

<bold>Sankofa.

</bold>Sankofa is an Akan word that means, "We must go back and reclaim
our

past so we can move forward; so we understand why and how we came to

be who we are today." Written, directed and produced by Ethiopian-born

filmmaker Haile Gerima, SANKOFA is a powerful film about Maafa-the

African holocaust. Done from an African/African-American perspective,

this story is a vastly different one from the generally distorted

representations of African people that Hollywood gives us. This

revolutionary feature film connects enslaved black people with their

African past and culture. It empowers Black people on the screen by

showing how African peoples' desire for freedom made them resist,
fight

back, and conspire against their enslavers, overseers and collective
past

through the vision on Mona, who visits her ancestral experience on a
new

world planation as Shola. We share the life she endures as a slave and

experiences her growing consciousness and transformation [description

from web site]. 1993. 125 min.

<bold>A Son of Africa.

</bold>A docudrama based on the book, The Interesting Narrative of the
Life of

Oloudah Equiano, or Gustavus Vaasa the African, which was the first

influential slave autobiography. When it was published in 1789, it
fueled a

growing anti-slavery movement in the U.S. and England. This production

employs dramatic reconstruction, archival material and interviews with

scholars. Equiano's narrative begins in the West African village where
he

was kidnapped into slavery in 1756. He was shipped to a Virginia

plantation and then later sold again to a British naval officer. Here
he

learned to read and write, became a skilled trader, eventually bought
his

freedom and married into English society where he became a leading

abolitionist. 28 min.

<bold>Souls of Passage.

</bold>A film based on an exhibition of the excavated Henrietta Marie,
a slave

ship which sank off the Florida coast in 1700. The piece traces the

Henrietta Marie's trip--both the route the slave ship took and the
voyage

the exhibit made in its four year tour. Provides fascinating
historical

evidence of the slave trade in 17th century America, the conditions
the

slaves endured and the impact the exhibit had on current day North

Carolina residents. Based on the exhibit: "A Slave ship speaks: the
wreck

of the Henrietta Marie" sponsored by the Mel Fisher Maritime Heritage

Society. Slave narrations from the Federal Writers Project. 1996.

<bold>Unearthing the Slave Trade.

</bold>On the eve of the American Revolution, New York City had the
largest

number of enslaved Africans of any colonial settlement outside
Charleston.

Though this has seldom been acknowledged, African labor was essential

in the building of New York. Today, archeological excavation of sites
on

both sides of the Atlantic is bringing to light aspects of the slave
trade

long buried in the liberal minds of those north of the Mason-Dixon
line.

28 min.

If any of these look hot, let me know and I'll send along distributor
info.

<color><param>1E1E,1B1B,1B1B</param>

Gary Handman

Director

Media Resources Center

Moffitt Library

UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000

510-643-8566

ghandman@library.berkeley.edu

http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

</color><color><param>FFFF,0000,0000</param>"You are looking into the mind of
home video. It is innocent, it is aimless,

it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld</color>

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