Telecom headlines...week of May 18

Gary Handman (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
Fri, 22 May 1998 14:17:30 -0700 (PDT)

Title: Kodak and AOL Are Expected to Unveil Pact Allowing Digitized
Photos On-Line
Source: Wall Street Journal (B16)
<http://wsj.com/>
Author: Jared Sandberg & Laura Johannes
Issue: Convergence
Description: Eastman Kodak Co. and America Online Inc. are planning to
announce an agreement today that would allow AOL subscribers who submit
film
to one of Kodak's 30,000 retail processors to receive digitized versions
of
their photographs via their on-line accounts. The service to be called
"You've Got Pictures!" is expected to start this fall. It is part of
Kodak's
continuing effort to "stem the erosion" of its more traditional film
business into digital-based alternatives.

Title: Invisible Viewers
Source: Chicago Tribune (Sec5, p.3)
<http://chicago.tribune.com>
Author: David Bauder
Issue: Television Economics/Advertising
Description: Outside of homes, no one really knows how many people are
watching television -- a strange lapse for a business dependent on knowing
how big its audience is. Television executives are pleading with Nielsen
Media Research to figure out how to measure viewers in bars, health clubs,
hotels, and other out-of-home locations. Nielsen estimates that 25.7
million
people watch TV outside their home and will figure out a way to measure
them, if someone will pay for it.

Title: Summer Movies Sites Finally Exploit the Web's Multimedia Potential
Source: New York Times (CyberTimes)
<http://www.nytimes.com/library/tech/98/05/cyber/artsatlarge/21artsatlarge.html>
Author: Matthew Mirapaul
Issue: Arts
Description: The Web is playing its largest part ever in the promotional
campaigns for big-budget summer blockbusters. Advertisements are now
routinely
listing "vanity" URLs in addition to the usual credits and critic remarks.
In
its third annual survey of summer movie Web sites, CyberTimes'
"arts@large" has
visited 20 of the promotional summer sites and found that they are finally
starting to employ the use of the Web's multimedia potential and that file
size
really does matter.

Title: Broadcast Views
Source: FCC
<http://www.fcc.gov/Speeches/Tristani/spgt808.html>
Author: Commissioner Tristani
Issue: Broadcast Regulation
Description: "I wanted to start with a question a lot of people around
Washington have been asking: why should broadcasters be treated any
differently under the First Amendment than other media voices like
newspapers? The short answer is because the Supreme Court said so. In Red
Lion, the Supreme Court said: 'Where there are substantially more
individuals who want to broadcast than there are frequencies to allocate,
it
is idle to posit an unbridgeable First Amendment right to broadcast
comparable to the right of every individual to speak, write or publish.'
The
Court added: 'There is no sanctuary in the First Amendment for unlimited
private censorship in a medium not open to all.' I know what a lot of you
are probably thinking. Yeah, sure, Red Lion. Hasn't that case, and the
whole
scarcity rationale it relied on, been thoroughly discredited? Isn't Red
Lion
just one of those Warren Court relics that would never be upheld today? If
you only looked at law reviews and the stuff coming out of Washington
think
tanks, you might think so. But apparently word of Red Lion's demise hasn't
reached the only audience that matters -- the Supreme Court. In both the
1994 Turner decision and the 1997 Reno decision, the Court expressly
reaffirmed Red Lion and the scarcity rationale as justifying more
intrusive
regulation of broadcasters than newspapers and other media. I don't think
the Commission should be in the business of questioning the Court's
judgment."

Author: Quentin Hardy
Issue: Partnership
Description: Motorola Inc. announced that it will join forces with
Teledesic
LLC in a move that will likely push forward the design and construction of
the $9 billion satellite-based system for high-speed data and video.
"Motorola
will take a 26 percent stake in Teledesic, which will use 288 low
earth-orbit
satellites to create an 'Internet in the sky,' for a combination of cash
and
design technology valued at $750 million."

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley, CA 94720-6000
510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu

"You are looking into the mind of home video. It is innocent, it is aimless,
it is determined, it is real" --Don DeLillo, Underworld