Re: Timber videos

Appalshop@aol.com
Tue, 12 Aug 1997 07:08:10 -0400 (EDT)

READY FOR HARVEST: CLEARCUTTING IN THE SOUTHERN APPALACHIANS
Directed by Anne Lewis Johnson
Color, 28 Minutes, 1993
Video 1/2"; Rental 1/2"=20

Beginning in the late 1800s, and continuing into the early decades of th=
e
20th century, forests in the Southern Appalachian Mountains were extensiv=
ely
logged. Since that time, the forests have grown back and matured. These
hardwood stands of hickory, oak, black cherry, and walnut are attracting
timber companies to private land and national forests. On public propert=
y,
the U.S. Forest Service sells the trees for prices well below market valu=
e.
In most cases, companies choose to harvest these tracts by clearcutting,=
a
timbering method in which all trees are cut, regardless of size.
=09
"Ready for Harvest: Clearcutting in the Southern Appalachians," a
documentary video by Anne Lewis Johnson of Appalshop, explores the comple=
x
questions of how we use and protect our native forests. The documentary l=
ooks
at forest issues through the experiences of the Western North Carolina
Alliance. Like grassroots groups throughout the country, the Alliance ha=
s
had to wrestle with policies established by the U.S. Forest Service that =
run
counter to conservation practices and which discourage public participati=
on
in decisions about how public property is used. Footage includes intervi=
ews
with Walton Smith, who has practiced sound forest management techniques f=
or
more than 60 years; Betty Ballew, whose community was dislocated because
other people wanted to use the land for their own purposes; and Chuck Cro=
w, a
Cherokee who has seen the short term gains and long term losses to
communities when the forests that surround them are stripped of trees. M=
ary
Kelly, an ecologist, explains the importance of biological diversity to a
healthy ecosystem.

On the other side, the U.S. Forest Service has promoted management pract=
ices
that dicourage growth of non commercial species, such as dogwood and red
maple. Timber companies, citing the Forest Service's expertise, harvest
trees primarily by clearcutting because it is more economical than select=
ive
cutting.

"Ready for Harvest" is meant to encourage the inclusion of the public,
particularly people in rural areas, in the debate about a forest manageme=
nt
policy that affects their environment, economy, and culture.

"...a factually sound and emotionally stimulating video presentation of a
major issue..." Edward C. Fritz, Forest Reform Network

"...brings fresh insight into the shady dealings of the U.S. Forest Servi=
ce.
Rural communities profiled are an inspiration for communities everywhere=
,
proving that local organizing can make a difference." San Francisco
Environmental Film Festival

"...an incisive, chilling look at the thinking that prevails in the U.S.
Forest Service in North Carolina."=20
John Alexander Williams, Appalachian State Univ, Boone, NC

"Excellent, powerful, and scary film. Frightening to think of forces
(industries, governments) outside ourselves that can destroy us and the
environment." Anne Radford Phillips, Cooperative Extension Services, No=
rth
Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC

Festivals & Screenings

Athens International Film & Video Festival '94 - Screening
Charlotte Film & Video Festival Screening
International Communication Film & Video Festival '94 - Silver Plaque Awa=
rd
North American Association for Environmental Education Film &=20
Video Festival Best of Show
San Francisco Environmental Film Festival Screening
Sinking Creek Film & Video Festival '94 - Finalist
The Other American Film Festival '95 - Screening
Vermont {EarthPeace} International Film Festival '94 - Semi Finalist
Who Owns America? Conference '95 - Screening
SECA National Broadcast =9196

Intended Audience: Elementary, Jr. High, High, College, Adult
=20
To order or for more information call or write:

APPALSHOP FILMS
306 MADISON STREET
WHITESBURG, KY 41858
Phone (606) 633 0108
Toll Free for ordering 1 800 545 7467
FAX (606) 633 1009
email address: appalshop@aol.com
http://www.uky.edu/Projects/Appal