Re: SEARCHING FOR CANADIAN DISTRIBUTOR -Reply

La Unica Coca-Cola en el Desierto (denice@U.Arizona.EDU)
Tue, 28 Jan 1997 11:54:20 -0700 (MST)

As I understand it, this depends on copyright issues in each country.
Originally in america, film copyright was for only a short period (28
years i believe) and if it wasn't renewed, it became public domain. For
example, the films of director Frank Capra are public domain since the
copyright was never renewed. This law was changed in the sixties to 75
years and people were given the option to extend their copyright at
that time. A lot of people did, a lot didn't. Most silents, therfore, are
public domain. The only ones you might have to be careful off are titles
by people like Mary Pickford, Chaplin, Douglas Fairbanks Sr, etc as they
were pretty savvy about retaining copyright personnaly and may have
transferred those rights to their heirs.

hope this helps

deb cady
debcady@thepentagon.com

> Hello Jessica,
>
> You mentioned a while back that certain films such as Cabinet of
> Caligari, Nosferatu and Potemkin are in the Public Domain. What
> exactly does this mean? If films are in the PD does it automatically
> give them Public Performance rights anywhere in the world?
>
> Anne Roney
> Video Librarian, London Public Library
> London Ontario Canada
>