Re: Taping from a broadcast.

Kristine R. Brancolini (brancoli@indiana.edu)
Mon, 28 Oct 1996 14:55:24 -0500 (EST)

Bonnie: We only add off-air tapes to our collection that have been
licensed. I'm assuming that other libraries are doing the same thing.
You will see those records in OCLC for this library, but they are for
legal copies only. Please do not assume that they are illegal just
because they say "Taped off-air." And you will run into titles that do
not have pre-recorded counterparts. For example, we often add
teleconferences to our collection and the only way to acquire them is to
tape them off the satellite.

Kristine Brancolini
Indiana University Libraries
brancoli@indiana.edu

On Mon, 28 Oct 1996, HIRSCH Bonnie C wrote:

> This is interesting. One of my duties is copy cataloging AV from OCLC.
> Every so often I run into a record of something that says it was taped
> off-air, that has current holdings, and that is dated several years ago.
> Does this mean that those holdings are all illegal? I've never run into
> a title that didn't also have a record for the commercially purchased
> copy I'm cataloging.
>
> Bonnie Hirsch
> Eugene (Oregon) Public Library
> bonnie.c.hirsch@ci.eugene.or.us
> ----------
> | From: Judy Jones
> | To: Multiple recipients of list
> | Subject: Re: Taping from a broadcast.
> | Date: Monday, October 28, 1996 7:57AM
> |
> | More or less, my interpretation for off-air recording and fair use is
> | this: you may, at the faculty member's request, record a program
> | off-air. It must be used within 10 days for face-to-face instruction
> | and it may be used once more during that time for reinforcement. The
> | tape must be destroyed or recycled within 45 days. During that time,
> | hopefully one has purchased a legal copy if it is worthy of keeping.
> | A copy kept for educational or commercial purposes for two years is
> | very illegal.
> |
> | Date: Mon, 28 Oct 1996 04:09:11 -0800
> | Reply-to: videolib@library.berkeley.edu
> | From: Appalshop@aol.com
> | To: Multiple recipients of list
> <videolib@library.berkeley.edu>
> | Subject: Taping from a broadcast.
> |
> | Gary,
> |
> | A Question -- A university in North Carolina called to ask if they
> could
> | duplicate a video of ours to use in an anthropology class on campus.
> The
> | problem -- they did not purchase the tape or rights to use the tape
> from
> | Appalshop. Apparently (from a conversation with a professor who
> wanted to
> | copy the tape) it was taped from a public television broadcast over
> two years
> | ago and is now being used in their media center.
> |
> | What are our rights? I understand that the copying of material from a
> | broadcast is legal if it is used an educational setting, but the use
> is
> | limited to two weeks following the broadcast.
> |
> | As I am fairly new here, and no one else seems to know, what is your
> opinion?
> | Is there a large publication in which I can purchase for reference?
> I need
> | direction.
> |
> | Thanks, Carolyn Sturgill, Distributor, Appalshop Film & Video
> |
>