Re: [Videolib] Blu Ray versus DVD

From: Steffen, James M <jsteffe@emory.edu>
Date: Tue Dec 15 2009 - 07:31:33 PST

Thanks, Dennis.

This article is basically in line with what I've read elsewhere about the rate of Blu-ray adoption by consumers. I had assumed that the recession would have more of an impact on the Blu-ray rollout than it apparently did.

Personally, I don't think Blu-ray "another laserdisc in the making." Physical discs will still be around for a while. For one thing, many parts of this country don't yet have the data infrastructure to support downloading true hi-def movies on demand. I also suspect Blu-ray will co-exist with DVD for quite a while. Many films and videos simply don't have good enough looking elements to support a new transfer in high definition.

BTW, our library has started to collected a limited number of Blu-ray discs, mostly of films that commonly get screened for classes. There are a handful of newly constructed rooms on campus that have high-definition video projectors, and we have a plasma screen in our Group Viewing Room.

If your school has a film/media studies program, it might be worth considering Blu-ray down the road--if only because you can obtain a more film-like image for feature films shot in 35mm. With good hi-def transfers, you can even see some of the film's grain structure. Considering how non-theatrical film rentals have largely died out, these days most people's contact with older films is only through DVD. It's sad to think how screenings of VHS and DVD have replaced 16mm and 35mm, even in film studies programs. Schools used to have film rental budgets--where did the money go? To me, the big downside of consuming films exclusively on the small screen or on standard definition video is that younger filmmakers will miss out on the sense of nuance, texture and space that a large-screen, 35mm projection can convey. Also, if filmmakers compose mainly for the small screen their images will end up having less variety.

--
James M. Steffen, PhD
Film Studies and Media Librarian
Theater and Dance Subject Liaison
Marian K. Heilbrun Music and Media Library
Emory University
540 Asbury Circle
Atlanta, GA 30322-2870
Phone: (404) 727-8107
FAX: (404) 727-2257
Email: jsteffe@emory.edu
Web: www.jamesmsteffen.net
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Message: 1
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 16:39:46 -0500
From: Dennis Doros <milefilms@gmail.com>
Subject: [Videolib] Blu Ray versus DVD
To: Video Library questions <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
Message-ID:
        <2ad8b9eb0912141339s3aa28043l968af83f8b5fd6b9@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
Well, it's obvious that no school media center really is into blu ray and
not many public libraries are thrilled about it either. However, completely
by coincidence, here's an article in the NY Times...
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/14/technology/14bluray.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=Blu%20ray&st=cse
It kind of makes you wonder if this is just a puff piece, if the individual
consumer is going to ahead of the curve of the institutions, or if it's
another laserdisc in the making. It's what can drive everybody crazy.
--
Best,
Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video/Milliarium Zero
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: 201-767-3117
Fax: 201-767-3035
email: milefilms@gmail.com
www.milestonefilms.com
www.arayafilm.com
www.exilesfilm.com
www.wordisoutmovie.com
www.killerofsheep.com
AMIA Philadelphia 2010: www.amianet.org
Join "Milestone Film" on Facebook!
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Message: 2
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 17:00:38 -0500
From: "Gwen Gerber" <ggerber@ebiomedia.com>
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Online streaming media licenses (Gwen Gerber,
        BioMEDIA ASSOCIATES)
To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
Message-ID: <028d01ca7d08$df155cd0$9d401670$@com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
Today, BioMEDIA ASSOCIATES offers streaming media licenses for science
titles that you have the rights to:
1.    Deliver to institutionally authenticated clients - your server or
ours.  If you have a website, we can get you set-up to deliver content this
way.
2.    Use extracts or clips in teaching and learning endeavors within
existing copyright laws
3.    We provide updated file formats as January 4, 2010 we will provide all
current clients with the option to use MPEG4 (400 and 800) files for the
cost of shipping of the hard drive.  New clients can choose among the
formats that we currently offer.  We review each encoding request
individually and provide permission in writing if the client wants to encode
programs.  Plus we offer clients the right to use the programs in multiple
formats (hard copy i.e. DVD, streaming, and broadcast) for the same license
fee.
4.    A fair and decent price---To-date we haven't had clients unhappy with
our pricing model. Additionally, you can pay us annually over the life of a
license to maximize your ability to build your own streaming media library.
We don't offer science titles in perpetuity as science is constantly
changing.  What would cell biology from 1990 teach today?  If it makes
sense, we offer long term rights for programs.   BioMEDIA ASSOCIATES doesn't
use stock footage but it can be very costly to buy stock footage in
perpetuity.  As Chip Taylor says, there are many variables in the
relationship between the distributor and the producer.
As a distributor of media that is designed for use in the classroom, we are
doing everything we can to make it easy for teachers to have access to media
in any format to teach.
Happy Holidays!
Gwen
Gwen Gerber
BioMEDIA ASSOCIATES
P.O. Box 1234
Beaufort, SC  29901-1234
877.661.5355/843.470.0236 voice, 843.470.0237 fax
ggerber@ebiomedia.com   www.ebiomedia.com
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Message: 3
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 17:37:36 -0500
From: "Jonathan Miller" <jmiller@icarusfilms.com>
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Docuseek?
To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
Message-ID: <012701ca7d0e$0ab070f0$f864a8c0@www.frif.com>
Content-Type: text/plain;       charset="us-ascii"
Dear Vicki
It's great to learn that you find DocuSeek useful! I am sorry for the delay
then in responding to your inquiry.
However, I am pleased to tell you that we have now (this past weekend in
fact) re freshed the DocuSeek database with all the new titles we have been
notificed about/ provided the meta data for from the participating
distributors.
Please, take a look and see if it seems more up-to-date and useful for you.
It should be!
Thanks again.
Sincerely,
Jonathan Miller
For those who don't know, Docuseek is a search site for independent
documentary, social issue, and educational videos available in the U.S. and
Canada. Docuseek allows you to simultaneously search eight leading film
distributors' complete collections of over 3,200 titles, representing the
highest quality documentary and instructional media, films and videos
available.
Here is the URL: www.DocuSeek.com
Jonathan Miller
President
Icarus Films
32 Court Street, 21st Floor
Brooklyn, NY 11201 USA
tel 1.718.488.8900
fax 1.718.488.8642
www.IcarusFilms.com
jmiller@IcarusFilms.com
-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Vicki Nesting
Sent: Tuesday, December 08, 2009 5:46 PM
To: videolib
Subject: [Videolib] Docuseek?
Can anyone tell me the status of the Docuseek web site (www.docuseek.com)?
Is it still being maintained?  This was a great search tool for finding
documentaries on social issues, but when I ran a couple searches recently,
there were hardly any current (2008-09) releases included in the results.
Thanks in advance,
Vicki
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Vicki Nesting
Assistant Director
St. Charles Parish Library
vnestin@bellsouth.net
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues
relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control,
preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and
related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective
working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication
between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and
distributors.
------------------------------
Message: 4
Date: Mon, 14 Dec 2009 14:51:39 -0800
From: John Streepy <John.Streepy@cwu.EDU>
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Blu Ray versus DVD
To: Video Library questions <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
Message-ID: <4B26510A.1F8F.0042.1@gwmail.cwu.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
The sales figures make me wonder if many people have just come to the time that they could replace their DVD players and are just hedging their bets because it is a win win situation, the blu-ray player will continue to play DVDs (and if they do have a large screen flat panel they play them quite nicely) and if blu ray does survive as a format then people have a machine to play them on.  I plan on getting a Blu-ray player when my current machine dies, but I don't plan on wholesale replacing everything in my personal library (though I did buy Pixar's Up on Blu Ray but only because I got a DVD with it.)
that is my thoughts,
jhs
John H. Streepy
Media Services Supervisor
Library-Media Circulation
James E. Brooks Library
Central Washington University
400 East University Way
Ellensburg, WA  98926-7548
(509) 963-2861
http://www.lib.cwu.edu/media
"Hand to hand combat just goes with the territory.
All part of being a librarian" -- James Turner "Rex Libris"
Transitus profusum est nocens!
>>> Dennis Doros <milefilms@gmail.com> 12/14/2009 1:39 PM >>>
Well, it's obvious that no school media center really is into blu ray and not many public libraries are thrilled about it either. However, completely by coincidence, here's an article in the NY Times...
http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/14/technology/14bluray.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=Blu%20ray&st=cse ( http://www.nytimes.com/2009/12/14/technology/14bluray.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=Blu%20ray&st=cse )
It kind of makes you wonder if this is just a puff piece, if the individual consumer is going to ahead of the curve of the institutions, or if it's another laserdisc in the making. It's what can drive everybody crazy.
--
Best,
Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video/Milliarium Zero
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: 201-767-3117
Fax: 201-767-3035
email: milefilms@gmail.com
www.milestonefilms.com
www.arayafilm.com
www.exilesfilm.com
www.wordisoutmovie.com
www.killerofsheep.com
AMIA Philadelphia 2010: www.amianet.org
Join "Milestone Film" on Facebook!
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Received on Tue Dec 15 07:34:37 2009

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