Re: [Videolib] Question for the LISTSERV

From: Lisa Bankert <LBankert@onlib.org>
Date: Fri Nov 20 2009 - 07:13:09 PST

Oooh, here's another idea, Christina! I can't believe I didn't mention
it before. Free popcorn! If you can swing one of those popcorn
machines into your budget - the ones that pop 4 oz. at a shot - they are
made of AWESOME!! We got one for a film series we're doing, and people
get giddy over free popcorn at the 'brary. Ours wasn't excessively
expensive, and you can get the little packets that have the incredibly
healthy (ha!) coconut oil goop and popcorn all in one to make life easy.

 

Dennis has great ideas too. Theme nights would be very cool. Promote
in every way possible. We've managed to get a quick TV spot on our
local news station the day of our film. We can change the message
printed at the bottom of our checkout receipts - put a little blurb
about the film there a week prior. Print up some bookmarks on the
gaudiest chartreuse paper you can find and pop them into the YA books as
they are checked out. Free food. Twilight. More Twilight.

 

See? Now I'm excited!

 

From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Dennis Doros
Sent: Friday, November 20, 2009 10:01 AM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Question for the LISTSERV

 

Dear Christina,

 

Well, first there's Twilight, Twilight or Twilight at least for the
girls. But violent or not (I've only seen 10 minutes of it on a plane
and I kinda liked it even.), here's some other ideas.

 

1) Don't announce the film. Have a mystery night where the films aren't
announced until they get there and it becomes the big secret. What are
they going to play tonight?

2) Make it a fan club kind of gathering or even work with a local fan
club (there's one for just about every movie) -- where people get to
dress up.

3) Have some mother-daughter movie nights.

4) I'm not sure how big your town is (we only have one school for K-8),
but go to your local schools and give a presentation at the appropriate
class. Even work with the teacher(s) to coordinate a movie of a book
they might be reading in class. My 8th grader read The Outsiders and Pay
it Forward this year. (The former is a much better movie, but that's my
opinion)

5) If the schools are putting on plays (usually musicals, and again in
my son's grade, it's Grease this year), show the movie working with the
drama teacher.

6) Get a local restaurant or bakeshop to donate free food for the
attendees. Pizza places are a likely place to donate especially if you
mention them in your publicity.

7) Have lunch with the local editor. (Okay, if you're in NYC, this is
unlikely) Express why this series is important to you and that they need
to cover your events. In smaller towns, they'll even let you write the
piece and you can state why they should come.

8) Start a Myspace and Facebook fan club for your movie site.

9) Have the school or town send a web blast to parents.

10) Make sure your equipment is good and the presentation is excellent.
Just about everybody has 50" TVs with surround sound so it's tough to
get people excited about a 20" monitor. Local stores might donate
equipment for a sign under the TV.

11) Giveaways. Local shops might be glad to promote their places.

12) Don't choose films that might be seen too much on basic cable like
TNT or USA. And push the boundaries. They don't have to be safe films. A
library is a good place for learning and discussing. Though I happen to
hate meaningless violent films as well.

13) Make it fun. Showbiz is entertainment and whether it's the Radio
City Music Hall in NY or an arts center in Dubuque, people have to feel
like they're welcome and you're happy they're there.

 

There's more ideas and I hope other librarians chip in since I think the
experience is as important as the film selection, but it's still early
and I haven't my second cup of coffee yet.

 

And I do like Patti's suggestion of Juno. You can even have a great
discussion afterwards. And to keep on the Page, Whip It would be a great
choice from what I hear.

 

Dennis

Milestone Film & Video

 

 

On Fri, Nov 20, 2009 at 9:40 AM, Christina Cacace
<chriscacace@gmail.com> wrote:

Good morning! I have difficulty getting my teens (I am a Young Adult
Librarian) to come to movie programs at my branch (I showed Independence
Day last time and only three teens showed up). Would any of you be able
to recommend a good, non-violent teen movie that I could show? Thanks!

 

Christina

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel
of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
producers and distributors.

-- 
Best,
Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video/Milliarium Zero
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: 201-767-3117
Fax: 201-767-3035
email: milefilms@gmail.com
www.milestonefilms.com
www.arayafilm.com
www.exilesfilm.com
www.wordisoutmovie.com
www.killerofsheep.com
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Join "Milestone Film" on Facebook!

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.
Received on Fri Nov 20 07:13:33 2009

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