Re: [Videolib] College/University film societies?

From: Dennis Doros <milefilms@gmail.com>
Date: Tue Nov 03 2009 - 22:17:57 PST

Dear Judy,

I believe the answer to one question is yes and no -- rental fees were
always an issue as far back as 16mm films were created for non-theatre use
(around 1928 as I recall). And the most popular films weren't really
available and certainly not anything brand-new. (My father remembers seeing
the 1925 Phantom of the Opera on an outdoor screening in his town of
Freeacres, NJ that a man rented from a local distributor but it was 1934 or
so by then.) However there PROBABLY no differential between educational and
public use since real money was not being made by film societies. (Cornell
Cinema and University of Chicago's Doc Films both started around 1937 and
there were probably others.) Kodak, Willoughby and Mogull catalogs have
rental rates in them but I can't remember if they had differences in class
versus PPR. They're probably online somewhere.

My "guess" would be that in the late 1950s when the birth of theaters
showing only classic films (the Brattle, the Elgin, etc) putt these theaters
in competition with the local schools that the money became significant
enough, and Public Performance came into being. I'm out-of-town right now
but I would bet going through my old film catalogs from the 1960s that
different rental fees came into being. Definitely by 1977 when I started and
it was DEFINITELY pre-video, there were different rental cost for
educational and public performances. To rent a 16mm was anywhere from $50
for a public domain title that everybody had to $1000 for something like
Diva. And that was for one screening only. For a library or college to buy a
16mm print could cost up to $5000 when I entered the business in the early
1980s. Most of them were around $1500 to $2000. Inflation effects everything
except television sets and film. :-)

Best,
Dennis

On Tue, Nov 3, 2009 at 1:36 PM, Shoaf,Judith P <jshoaf@ufl.edu> wrote:

> Alex,
>
> Not a trick question at all. I was just trying to construct a very precise
> scenario (and I hope YOU wouldn’t give them a great PPR rate since I
> specified Kino….). Thanks for the answer.
>
>
>
> There was so much emphasis on club membership that I wondered whether there
> could be a club that did not have to pay PPR.
>
>
>
> Does the concept of PPR predate videocassettes?
>
>
>
> Could a university that owned a copy of, say, Top Hat, in 1962, have an
> advertised free showing of the film for students without paying PPR?
>
>
>
> Did the Cinematheque in Paris have to worry about PPR in the 60s and 70s?
> Yikes. My life is flashing before me.
>
>
>
> Judy
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues
> relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control,
> preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and
> related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective
> working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication
> between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and
> distributors.
>
>

-- 
Best,
Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: 201-767-3117
Fax: 201-767-3035
email: milefilms@gmail.com
www.milestonefilms.com
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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.
Received on Tue Nov 3 22:20:06 2009

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