Re: [Videolib] Home use prices vs. PPR prices

From: Moshiri, Farhad <moshiri@uiwtx.edu>
Date: Fri Aug 21 2009 - 10:41:28 PDT

Dear Jessica,

You're right that it depends on the product. "Lesbian basket weaving cooperative in Bolivia" is an extreem example, and as you say, maybe a joke. But I'm thinking of more mainstreem subjects and companies such as First Run who are offering their documentaries with home use pricing. I will be surprised if these DVDs do not sell more than 300 to 400 copies. That's why I asked if there is any statistics or studies done to see for example how many copies of First Run documentaries have been purchased by libraries. Any time I check OCLC WorldCat, I notice that the number of expensive DVDs that are owned by libraries is very low, maybe 15 to 20. But for DVDs with home use pricing the number of libraries owning them are much higher naturally.

Farhad
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From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu [videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Jessica Rosner [maddux2014@gmail.com]
Sent: Thursday, August 20, 2009 4:32 PM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Home use prices vs. PPR prices

I think it depends on the product. The sad fact is that most of the titles that come with high end pricing simply have no 'home use' or retail market. In most cases the PPR rights are largely meant as an "extra" that you probably don't need. I sometimes evilly joke about the documentary about a lesbian basket weaving co-operative in Bolivia as the type of film sold for the educational market. It is going to have a VERY small market thus the distributor or filmmaker
is going to charge $250 on up a pop or the film is never going to get distributed at all. If the distributor can sell 20-40 copies at that level of price then they can afford to make these kinds of films available. I am sure the same distributor or filmmaker would LOVE to sell the titles at $25( without the PPR which you probably didn't want anyway ) IF they could sell 250 to 450 copies ( a little more than the price difference given all the extra work) but they really can't.
I think this issue has been discussed over the years and it would be great if librarians and distributors could come up with a solution but short of 300 libraries
pre-ordering a title to keep the price down I don't really see it.

Jessica Rosner

On Thu, Aug 20, 2009 at 12:52 PM, Moshiri, Farhad <moshiri@uiwtx.edu<mailto:moshiri@uiwtx.edu>> wrote:

Dear Collective mind,

Has there been any studies done to find if a video publisher makes more money if it offers its videos with home use pricing in contrast to limiting it to PPR pricing? The reason Iím asking this question is that Iím sure there are other institutions like my university that do not show its videos to the public and does not need PPR for the videos in its collection. We check out our videos only for individual use at home or for use in face-to-face classroom use. Since we have a very limited budget for AV materials, we are forced to purchase cheaper videos. We miss many good documentaries due to their expensive pricing. But companies such as First Run and PBS are offering home use pricing for their documentaries that we use a lot. Iím just guessing that other publishers could make more money and offset the high cost of producing documentaries if they sell more copies of their products with home use pricing. I highly appreciate your inputs.

Farhad Moshiri

University of the Incarnate Word

San Antonio, TX

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VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.
Received on Fri Aug 21 10:42:08 2009

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