Re: [Videolib] videolib Digest, Vol 16, Issue 65

Lawrence Daressa (LD@newsreel.org)
Wed, 25 Mar 2009 11:05:00 -0700

I've found this thread on streaming video very informative. I agree with
Gary that a serials model is unworkable from both the point of view of
distributors and video librarians. DVD sales with or without streaming
license for the life of a file or DVD make more sense to me. There have
however been frequent protestations on this list that distributors'
prices are too high and that copyright restricts wider educational use.
Therefore Newsreel is trying an experiment with our latest release, a
film about the "politics of knowledge," especially as it relates to
African anthropology. We will still sell DVDs for $195 or $390 with
unlimited streaming but the film will also be available for individual
download (rental) on i-Tunes for $2.99. This will allow students and
faculty at schools which cannot afford to buy a DVD.or streaming
license, to still have access to the title. If this optiion proves
useful to enough people, we will offer other titles on this basis and
make them available from more content aggregation sites. Students are,
of course, as economically stressed as the rest of us; but $2.99 seems a
small price compared to the cost of a Hollywood feature at the theatre,
a text book or even a hamburger!

Larry

-----Original Message-----
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Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 9:49 AM
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Subject: videolib Digest, Vol 16, Issue 65

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Today's Topics:

1. Re: streaming video= serials pricing model (Hutchison, Jane)
2. Warner Archive Releases (Jaeschke, Myles)
3. Re: Warner Archive Releases (Chris Lewis)
4. Scraping and fair use (Brigid Duffy)
5. Re: streaming video= serials pricing model (McKenzie, Rue)

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Message: 1
Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2009 10:17:14 -0400
From: "Hutchison, Jane" <HutchisonJ@wpunj.edu>
Subject: Re: [Videolib] streaming video= serials pricing model
To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
Message-ID:

<4D509E6F1D635043BC720A5B2A4EAE65061D33D7@callisto.unv.campus.wpunj.edu>

Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

As technology is repackaged in a new format, we in higher education need
to step up to the plate and provide leadership in developing a model
that supports our needs, not of the supplier. We are the consumers. We
have always prided ourselves in building collections that support the
academic needs of the institution, rather than just purchasing
collections that we hope faculty and students will use. We don't have
unlimited funds; therefore each purchase we make is careful, deliberate
and purposeful. That's why we spend all the time we do at the National
Media Market, screening and previewing titles that will suit our needs.

I too don't support a serial model. We can't from both a financial
standpoint as well as a collection development standpoint. We don't
want titles coming and going. Our titles are needed from an historic
point of view as well as supporting research. Once we purchase a
physical title, it usually stays in the collection until it is either
worn out or replaced.

In New Jersey, we have been working on a statewide level and are
developing a model license to present to distributors as well as
developing a statewide authentication tool and an annotation tool that
enables all institutions to use one interface and one easy way to
deliver. I agree that working with a number of interfaces and
logons/passwords is cumbersome not only to manage, but for the user.
The management of single title and single institution purchases through
our statewide network is currently being developed. I will be sharing
the open source products we've been developing at the National Media
Market this fall and I look forward to further discussion.

Jane B. Hutchison
Associate Director
Instruction & Research Technology
William Paterson University
Wayne, NJ 07470
973-720-2980 (work)
973-418-7727 (cell)
973-720-2585 (facs)
hutchisonj@wpunj.edu
-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 6:41 PM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Cc: videolib@list.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] streaming video= serials pricing model

Agree!

Given the serial nature of licensing, spending large portions of a
budget on big digital deals is stupid and irresponsible, unless it can
be fairly clearly demonstrated that there's a net gain benefit in terms
of content and potential users. That's why I rail so loudly against
what I've termed "curated" digital collections--those packages that are
assembled by a distributor/vendor and purchased lock, stock, and
stream... In my experience, fairly small subsets of these types of
collections may be valuable to the teaching and research mission of a
particular institution...the rest, not so. Doesn't matter it's often
all or nuthin'
I've noticed a fair number of cases in which the rush to go online and
the entrancement with all things digital (by library administrators, by
faculty) is leading libraries into some very unfortunate collection
decisions.

Even in cases where the titles are "hand-picked" for digital licensing,
the shift from one-time to recurrent cost will force a fairly stringent
yearly reassessment of a licensed title's worth to the institution.
Academic libraries aren't generally in the business of weeding. I have
a feeling that licensing is going to force us to do a kind of weeding by
"turning off" titles that aren't currently being used in classroom
teaching or in high demand. If it eventually so happens that online
becomes the ONLY mode of access...well, there goes the cultural record.

Gary Handman

> It is rather obvious to me that streaming video is moving to an
> environment where it can be treated not like monographs (buy it, use
it,
> lend it, ILL it), to a serials model (pay for a access to a select
group
> of users, vendors expect to charge annual fees, and libraries have to
pay
> more and more each year). Unfortunately, this model is great for
> vendors--and a useful way to fund infrastructure improvements
necessary to
> deliver digital--but it has not yet proved to be financially viable
for
> libraries long-term.
>
> I fear that in the future, academic libraries will spend large
portions of
> their budget on digital "big deals" at the expense of smaller,
> independently produced films that don't have all the bells & whistles.
>
> Sarah
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
> issues relating to the selection, evaluation,
acquisition,bibliographic
> control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats
in
> libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will
serve
> as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a
channel of
> communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
> producers and distributors.
>

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley

510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"I have always preferred the reflection of life to life itself."
--Francois Truffaut

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel
of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
producers and distributors.

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2009 09:37:53 -0500
From: "Jaeschke, Myles" <mjaesch@tulsalibrary.org>
Subject: [Videolib] Warner Archive Releases
To: "'videolib@lists.berkeley.edu'" <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
Message-ID:

<879996668085EE4AB2AAB049051C420D0DC2F1B758@TCCL-EMail.central.local>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Hello all,

I want to revisit for a moment our discussion of films that were once
available on VHS that have never come out on DVD. Warner Bros has just
released several titles that have not made it to DVD until now.
Unfortunately they are only available though Warner Bros. website only.
:(

http://www.wbshop.com/Warner-Archive/EXCLARCHIVE,default,sc.html

There are some great titles in there though...
Abe Lincoln in Illinois
King of the Roaring Twenties
Heroes for Sale
The Mating Game

There are plenty of others too. I just wish they could be purchased a
bit easier. Credit card orders can be a real hassle as many of you
probably know.

All the best,
Myles Jaeschke

Tulsa City-County Library System
Media Collections
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Message: 3
Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2009 10:52:48 -0400
From: Chris Lewis <clewis@american.edu>
Subject: Re: [Videolib] Warner Archive Releases
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Message-ID:
<4dfe774b0903250752g646fe7d5q27f77263381517e5@mail.gmail.com>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"

How they arrive at the number doesn't make a lot of sense but this
Variety article says Warners will be releasing as many as 5000 titles in
all:
http://www.variety.com/article/VR1118001496.html?categoryid=1009&cs=1

On Wed, Mar 25, 2009 at 10:37 AM, Jaeschke, Myles
<mjaesch@tulsalibrary.org>wrote:

> Hello all,
>
>
>
> I want to revisit for a moment our discussion of films that were once
> available on VHS that have never come out on DVD. Warner Bros has
> just released several titles that have not made it to DVD until now.
> Unfortunately they are only available though Warner Bros. website
> only. L
>
>
>
> http://www.wbshop.com/Warner-Archive/EXCLARCHIVE,default,sc.html
>
>
>
> There are some great titles in there though?
>
> Abe Lincoln in Illinois
>
> King of the Roaring Twenties
>
> Heroes for Sale
>
> The Mating Game
>
>
>
> There are plenty of others too. I just wish they could be purchased a

> bit easier. Credit card orders can be a real hassle as many of you
> probably know.
>
>
>
> All the best,
>
> Myles Jaeschke
>
>
>
> Tulsa City-County Library System
>
> Media Collections
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
> issues relating to the selection, evaluation,
> acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current
> and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It
> is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for
> video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between
> libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and
distributors.
>
>

--
Chris Lewis
Media Librarian
American University Library
202.885.3257

"Never write when you can talk. Never talk when you can nod. And never put anything in an e-mail." - Eliot Spitzer on Secrets of Success -------------- next part -------------- An HTML attachment scrubbed and removed. HTML attachments are only available in MIME digests.

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Message: 4 Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2009 08:06:39 -0700 From: Brigid Duffy <bduffy@sfsu.edu> Subject: [Videolib] Scraping and fair use To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu Message-ID: <CD29281F-1650-43DC-BE68-78A48550377E@sfsu.edu> Content-Type: text/plain; charset=US-ASCII; format=flowed; delsp=yes

This just in from the world of print, via the ABA Journal Tech Report: print people have problems with copyright and the Internet, too.

http://www.abajournal.com/news/how_much_excerpting_is_too_much_scraping_ suits_may_hone_fair_use_standard

Brigid Duffy Media Acquisitions Academic Technology San Francisco State University San Francisco, CA 94132-4200 E-mail: bduffy@sfsu.edu

------------------------------

Message: 5 Date: Wed, 25 Mar 2009 12:47:43 -0400 From: "McKenzie, Rue" <rmckenzie@lib.usf.edu> Subject: Re: [Videolib] streaming video= serials pricing model To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu> Message-ID: <83A7D9F74602294EB7FF81AB36D7F57B023E0062@tiki.fastmail.usf.edu> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

We have been experimenting with several avenues of online video. We lease some packages that have been very well received by faculty and students. I also do title by title additions, some based on faculty requests and some from my selection perspective. They have done well also, because many are titles that we have placed hard copies on reserve. We have avoided online products from vendors that don't provide IP authentication.

At this time, we do not have the infrastructure to store and serve online video, even if we can purchase the digital rights and/or files (which seems to be offered more these days). We have currently developed a proposal to expand our infrastructure to support this. In a way I would personally prefer to select titles and have the vendors/distributors handle the storing and serving, but then you are in lease rather than own mode (at least in my experience). So, we have hopes of taking on the responsibilities to expand our options.

We are also investigating the new service by Swank that provides online access to a number of feature films for use within specific guidelines of time and course. Not only would this support to some extent current physical course reserves, but also the use of feature films in courses with 100+ students, distance learners, and course meeting time constraints. We have A LOT of that. I still don't have all the details, but it will require additional coordination on our part as well. Of course the ultimate content and delivery need to be evaluated carefully.

Regardless of vendor and server, my current "best case scenario" is:

An authenticated patron could access an online video title found in the catalog, MetaLib, or any other Library resource available, click on the URL link, and seamlessly begin watching their chosen program in perfect quality. And, also have patrons understand that not every video they can think of is online, and quite possibly never will be. And, even if it is, the content and quality of the video is directly related to its successful use online, whether on a desktop or in a classroom.

Rue

Rue McKenzie Coordinator of Media Collections Collection Analysis & Technical Services University of South Florida, Tampa Library 813-974-6342

"An education isn't how much you have committed to memory, or even how much you know. It's being able to differentiate between what you know and what you don't."--Anatole France

From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Mark Kopp Sent: Wednesday, March 25, 2009 8:12 AM To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu Subject: Re: [Videolib] streaming video= serials pricing model

Sarah, et al.

It's definitely not a model you would apply to building "collections", but it looks like it's the model we are stuck with, in providing "content" to the classroom. The issue is that you obviously don't want all your eggs in one basket (one digital streaming vendor). But when you provide more than one service, then you have more and more codes, usernames, passwords, sign-up passwords, admin passwords, etc, etc, etc.

I guess we will have "collections" of digital streams...some housed locally (if you build the infrastructure) and some vendor based. It's a whole new way of looking at things.

Mark

Mark W. Kopp

Technology Assistant

IT Department

Appalachia Intermediate Unit 8

4500 6th Avenue

Altoona, PA 16602

P: 814-940-0223 ext. 1384

F: 814-949-0984

C: 814-937-2802

From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Andrews, Sarah E Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 6:08 PM To: videolib@list.berkeley.edu Subject: [Videolib] streaming video= serials pricing model

It is rather obvious to me that streaming video is moving to an environment where it can be treated not like monographs (buy it, use it, lend it, ILL it), to a serials model (pay for a access to a select group of users, vendors expect to charge annual fees, and libraries have to pay more and more each year). Unfortunately, this model is great for vendors--and a useful way to fund infrastructure improvements necessary to deliver digital--but it has not yet proved to be financially viable for libraries long-term.

I fear that in the future, academic libraries will spend large portions of their budget on digital "big deals" at the expense of smaller, independently produced films that don't have all the bells & whistles.

Sarah

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End of videolib Digest, Vol 16, Issue 65 ****************************************

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.