Re: [Videolib] streaming video= serials pricing model

Hutchison, Jane (HutchisonJ@wpunj.edu)
Wed, 25 Mar 2009 10:17:14 -0400

As technology is repackaged in a new format, we in higher education need
to step up to the plate and provide leadership in developing a model
that supports our needs, not of the supplier. We are the consumers. We
have always prided ourselves in building collections that support the
academic needs of the institution, rather than just purchasing
collections that we hope faculty and students will use. We don't have
unlimited funds; therefore each purchase we make is careful, deliberate
and purposeful. That's why we spend all the time we do at the National
Media Market, screening and previewing titles that will suit our needs.

I too don't support a serial model. We can't from both a financial
standpoint as well as a collection development standpoint. We don't
want titles coming and going. Our titles are needed from an historic
point of view as well as supporting research. Once we purchase a
physical title, it usually stays in the collection until it is either
worn out or replaced.

In New Jersey, we have been working on a statewide level and are
developing a model license to present to distributors as well as
developing a statewide authentication tool and an annotation tool that
enables all institutions to use one interface and one easy way to
deliver. I agree that working with a number of interfaces and
logons/passwords is cumbersome not only to manage, but for the user.
The management of single title and single institution purchases through
our statewide network is currently being developed. I will be sharing
the open source products we've been developing at the National Media
Market this fall and I look forward to further discussion.

Jane B. Hutchison
Associate Director
Instruction & Research Technology
William Paterson University
Wayne, NJ 07470
973-720-2980 (work)
973-418-7727 (cell)
973-720-2585 (facs)
hutchisonj@wpunj.edu
-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
Sent: Tuesday, March 24, 2009 6:41 PM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Cc: videolib@list.berkeley.edu
Subject: Re: [Videolib] streaming video= serials pricing model

Agree!

Given the serial nature of licensing, spending large portions of a
budget
on big digital deals is stupid and irresponsible, unless it can be
fairly
clearly demonstrated that there's a net gain benefit in terms of content
and potential users. That's why I rail so loudly against what I've
termed
"curated" digital collections--those packages that are assembled by a
distributor/vendor and purchased lock, stock, and stream... In my
experience, fairly small subsets of these types of collections may be
valuable to the teaching and research mission of a particular
institution...the rest, not so. Doesn't matter it's often all or
nuthin'
I've noticed a fair number of cases in which the rush to go online and
the
entrancement with all things digital (by library administrators, by
faculty) is leading libraries into some very unfortunate collection
decisions.

Even in cases where the titles are "hand-picked" for digital licensing,
the shift from one-time to recurrent cost will force a fairly stringent
yearly reassessment of a licensed title's worth to the institution.
Academic libraries aren't generally in the business of weeding. I have
a
feeling that licensing is going to force us to do a kind of weeding by
"turning off" titles that aren't currently being used in classroom
teaching or in high demand. If it eventually so happens that online
becomes the ONLY mode of access...well, there goes the cultural record.

Gary Handman

> It is rather obvious to me that streaming video is moving to an
> environment where it can be treated not like monographs (buy it, use
it,
> lend it, ILL it), to a serials model (pay for a access to a select
group
> of users, vendors expect to charge annual fees, and libraries have to
pay
> more and more each year). Unfortunately, this model is great for
> vendors--and a useful way to fund infrastructure improvements
necessary to
> deliver digital--but it has not yet proved to be financially viable
for
> libraries long-term.
>
> I fear that in the future, academic libraries will spend large
portions of
> their budget on digital "big deals" at the expense of smaller,
> independently produced films that don't have all the bells & whistles.
>
> Sarah
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
> issues relating to the selection, evaluation,
acquisition,bibliographic
> control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats
in
> libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will
serve
> as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a
channel of
> communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
> producers and distributors.
>

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley

510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"I have always preferred the reflection of life to life itself."
--Francois Truffaut

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel
of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
producers and distributors.

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.