Re: [Videolib] videolib Digest, ...another peeve

Roxane BenVau (Roxane.BenVau@gcccd.edu)
Thu, 13 Nov 2008 10:27:50 -0800

Gary's post about not needing PPR because his library only circulates videos for in-house viewing or classroom screening has raised a question that has been niggling at me for some time. Our library also only circulates videos for in-house viewing or classroom screenings, but my dean takes the view (and several copyright books I've read & classes I've taken espouse this view as well) that, because the library is open to the public, patron viewing of videos in the library constitutes a public performance. I'm encouraged to purchase videos that come with PPRs and discouraged from ordering from Amazon, etc, because there's no PPRs. The basis of this position stems from the Redd Horne decision that held that a private video booth in a video store, into which no one but a single patron could see a showing of a video, was indeed a public performance of the work. The argument goes that private viewing rooms or carrels in school libraries or classrooms are analogous to the private viewing ro
oms in the video store. To me, in-house viewings in an academic library's private carrels or booths just don't seem like they should be considered to be public performances. And it isn't really feasible for an academic library to only have videos that have PPRs, is it? Your thoughts on this would help.

Roxane BenVau
Media Librarian
Grossmont College
 

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of videolib-request@lists.berkeley.edu
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 8:36 AM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: videolib Digest, uc berkeley doesn't need PPR

Send videolib mailing list submissions to
videolib@lists.berkeley.edu

To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
https://calmail.berkeley.edu/manage/list/listinfo/videolib@lists.berkeley.edu

or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
videolib-request@lists.berkeley.edu

You can reach the person managing the list at
videolib-owner@lists.berkeley.edu

When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific
than "Re: Contents of videolib digest..."

Today's Topics:

1. ...another peeve (ghandman@library.berkeley.edu)
2. Re: ...another peeve [Scanned] (Mark Kopp)

----------------------------------------------------------------------

Message: 1
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 08:05:16 -0800 (PST)
From: ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] ...another peeve
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Message-ID:
<4242.169.229.36.120.1226592316.squirrel@calmail.berkeley.edu>
Content-Type: text/plain;charset=iso-8859-1

Oh yeah...I was just thinking this morning about another peeve related to
the subject of tiered pricing and home video vs PPR pricing:

I go absolutely wild when I buy an indie doc title for big bucks, only to
to find that it is released into the home video market a few months later.
Again, I don't need PPR--we only circulate stuff for in-house viewing by
individuals or classroom screening. I will consequently ALWAYS go for the
home version. Seems to me that distributors should be stand-up folks and
disclose the fact that particular titles in their catalogs are, or will
shortly be, available as home video... My policy is generally to return
materials that I discover to be available as such...which is a pain for
both me and the seller.

gary

---------------------------- Original Message ----------------------------
Subject: Re: [Videolib] videolib Digest, Vol 12, Issue 28
From: ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
Date: Wed, November 12, 2008 6:50 pm
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Reply To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
--------------------------------------------------------------------------

Oy...! OK: let's stop and breath deeply here.

I'm reminded of ol' Ben Franklin's aphorism about hanging together lest we
hanging separately. The fact is, I think, as far as independently
produced and distributed documentary works, both the makers/distributors
and the end-users have a kind of symbiotic relationship that bears little
relation to the print publishing/library world. I'm not nuts about paying
high prices either, but neither am I thrilled about the prospects of an
information universe populated by home video alone.

Tiered pricing has been a fact of life as long as I've been in the
business (only 30 years, Jerry...I'm wowed by your 37!) Am I wild about
this practice, less and less so as my dollars continue to shrink. I'm
willing to shell out mainly because I generally believe in the product and
I believe that no one is getting rich in this business. If folks like
Newsreel and Bullfrog and Icarus and Filmakers Library and New Day were
forced to charge home video prices across the board, how long would they
be around? Not very, I'd wager.

What I will not tolerate, however, is "tiered pricing" based on false
notions or false sales pitches. I'd like a buck for every distributor
I've come across over the years that foists higher prices on institutions
under the ol' "public performance rights" ploy...or, worse, the contention
that you need separate rights to use the material in a classroom. If a
distributor wants to charge higher prices to institutions based on market
factors, well, OK. Just do try to BS me about the reasons behind this
practice...

Gary Handman

> After 37 years in the business I think I have a very realistic view of
> media education distribution. In fact I just ordered "Zora Neale
> Hurston: Jump at the Sun" today at a request of a faculty member.
>
> I'm just glad that book seller's don't follow California Newsreel's
> pricing structure. More people read library copies so let's price them
> higher. Just because you derive the majority of your income from colleges
> and universities does not mean your tier system is justified. What type of
> logic is that? I don't know if you've read the newspapers about publicly
> funded organizations lately, but they've gone through a bit of a rough
> time and we have had to serve many more with much less. And I find your
> remarks like "overweening sense of entitlement" to be insulting. No one is
> saying producers and distributors shouldn't be compensated. What is being
> criticized is the methodology. I think it is the distributors who use the
> multitiered system that are going to be facing the "stark realities" of
> the present economy.
>
> Jerry
>
>> Jerry Notaro's indignation at California Newsreel's two-tier pricing
>> policy is a striking illustration of how an overweening sense of
>> entitlement blinds some video-lib contributors to the stark realities of
>> educational distribution. The University of South Florida touts itself
>> as among the top 63 (not 62) public research universities in the nation.
>> If its resources are really the same as an AME church in Mississipppi's
>> Black Belt, an inner city junior high school or a public library in
>> rural Kansas, one can only wonder at the quality of education its
>> students receive. California Newsreel is a non-profit, tax-exempt
>> corporation; we cannot justify denying poor and community-based
>> organizations access to our films just so the University of South
>> Florida can get a bargain. But that's exactly what we'd have to do if we
>> followed Jerry Notaro's wishes. The unalterable fact is California
>> Newsreel like many other educational distributors derives at least 85%
>> of its sales revenue from the higher priced university and college
>> market. If we were forced to choose just one price point, it is obvious
>> which it would have to be. This would, of course, only succeed in
>> contributing to the increasing inequality in this country some of us
>> hope the recent election will reverse. So if Newsreel elects to use its
>> grant income to subsidize the community market, we must, I'm afraid,
>> plead guilty. By the way, we have maintained two-tier pricing for close
>> to twenty years and most video librarians have understood its benefits.
>> If Jerry Notaro can provide USF staff and students films comparable to
>> "Unnatural Causes," "Race - the Power of an Illusion," "Zora Neale
>> Hurston: Jump at the Sun" or "Blue Eyed" from Blockbuster or Amazon.com,
>> so be it. I hope the rest of us on this list-serve will move forward on
>> the assumption that no one - producers, distributors or video librarians
>> - is getting rich ripping the other off. Educational distribution is a
>> fragile ecosystem; it should not be wantonly trashed.
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
>> [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of
>> videolib-request@lists.berkeley.edu
>> Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 2:28 PM
>> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
>> Subject: videolib Digest, Vol 12, Issue 28
>>
>> Send videolib mailing list submissions to
>> videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
>>
>> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit
>>
>> https://calmail.berkeley.edu/manage/list/listinfo/videolib@lists.berkele
>> y.edu
>>
>> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to
>> videolib-request@lists.berkeley.edu
>>
>> You can reach the person managing the list at
>> videolib-owner@lists.berkeley.edu
>>
>> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than
>> "Re: Contents of videolib digest..."
>>
>>
>> Today's Topics:
>>
>> 1. Re: Restricted PPR (Jerry Notaro)
>> 2. Re: Film on Pay Equity Issues (deg farrelly)
>> 3. Re: Restricted PPR (Steinhoff, Cindy)
>> 4. Re: Film on Pay Equity Issues (Elizabeth Stanley)
>>
>>
>> ----------------------------------------------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 1
>> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 15:16:14 -0500
>> From: Jerry Notaro <notaro@stpt.usf.edu>
>> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Restricted PPR
>> To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
>> Message-ID: <C540A3BE.206FE%notaro@stpt.usf.edu>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1"
>>
>>
>> 2 Two tiered pricing where a title IS available in the home market but
>> you are ?encouraged? to buy the higher priced model for PPR rights you
>> probably don?t need ( FYI as streaming becomes more desired this may
>> change) . Here you basically have to use common sense and make sure you
>> know your options
>>
>> The situation is worse than two tier and getting out of hand. California
>> Newsreel has a 3 tier pricing structure, differentiating further
>> College, Corporation, Gov't Agencies from High Schools, Public
>> Libraries, HBCUs & Qualifying Community Organizations. The first tier is
>> four times the price of the second. I don?t know where anyone gets the
>> idea we are better off, but we took a 15% hit off the top this year and
>> are facing an additional 10% next year.
>>
>> Jerry
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment scrubbed and removed.
>> HTML attachments are only available in MIME digests.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 2
>> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 14:38:43 -0700
>> From: deg farrelly <deg.farrelly@asu.edu>
>> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Film on Pay Equity Issues
>> To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
>> Cc: Sue.Parks@unt.edu
>> Message-ID: <C5409AF3.3C5D4%deg.farrelly@asu.edu>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII"
>>
>> The first work that comes to my mind is "The Willmar 8"
>>
>> Still distributed by California Newsreel:
>> http://www.newsreel.org/nav/title.asp?tc=CN0108&s=willmar%208
>>
>> The Willmar 8 is Academy Award winner Lee Grant's documentary
>> about working women which has been featured on the front page of The
>> Wall Street Journal, excerpted on 60 Minutes, and was broadcast
>> nationally by PBS. The film tells the story of eight unassuming,
>> apolitical women in America's heartland--Willmar, Minnesota--who were
>> driven by sex discrimination at work to take the most unexpected step of
>> their lives and found themselves in the forefront of the struggle for
>> women's rights. Risking jobs, friends, family and the opposition of
>> church and community, they began the longest bank strike in American
>> history in a dramatic attempt to assert their own equality and
>> self-worth.
>>
>>
>>
>> FMG has a very short (8 minutes) segment from ABC News:
>>
>> The Pay Gap: Sexism or Something Else?
>>
>> Warren Farrell protested alongside Gloria Steinem in support of women's
>> rights and was even elected to the board of NOW-three times. But Farrell
>> is also the author of Why Men Earn More: The Startling Truth Behind the
>> Pay Gap-and What Women Can Do About It. In this brief ABC News segment,
>> John Stossel considers the opposing views of Farrell and Martha Burk,
>> chair of the NCWO and author of Cult of Power: Sex Discrimination in
>> Corporate America and What Can Be Done About It. It's about supply and
>> demand, states Farrell, not sexism: higher compensation generally means
>> bigger sacrifices on the home front-a cost most women are statistically
>> less willing to bear than men. (8 minutes)
>>
>>
>> If you want something on a lighter note...
>>
>> 9 to 5
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> deg farrelly, Associate Librarian
>> Arizona State University at the West campus PO Box 37100 Phoenix,
>> Arizona 85069-7100
>> Phone: 602.543.8522
>> Email: deg.farrelly@asu.edu
>>
>>
>>> Our Women's Center and Women's Studies Program are teaming up to
>> increase
>>> awareness of gender pay equity issues by hosting some events for Equal
>> Pay Day
>>> next year. They'd like to host a screening of a film that deals with
>> pay
>>> equity issues. Any suggestions?
>>>
>>> Thank you!
>>>
>>> Sue
>>>
>>> Sue Parks
>>> Head, Media Library
>>> University of North Texas
>>
>>
>>
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 3
>> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 17:03:50 -0500
>> From: "Steinhoff, Cindy" <cksteinhoff@aacc.edu>
>> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Restricted PPR
>> To: "'videolib@lists.berkeley.edu'" <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
>> Message-ID:
>>
>> <3614638D4C701B438F335F0EFA8F6EBC6115B0C115@AACC-MAILBOX.aacc.cc.md.us>
>>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252"
>>
>> I, too, have been seeing more multi-tier pricing, with 3 or 4 tiers. I
>> just bought a DVD from a small distributor and it had 4 pricing tiers.
>> Home use was the lowest price, followed by K-12 schools Community
>> organizations and public libraries were next, and college and
>> universities at the highest price - $250, almost 3 times what community
>> organizations and public libraries would pay. When I asked about the
>> rationale, I was told that "more people would view it in a college," and
>> they were trying to price according use. We're not a huge school, and
>> this was a program that would be used by one instructor with probably no
>> more than 40-50 students a semester. I would guess, given the topic of
>> the program, that more viewers than that would see it in a high school
>> or community organization setting.
>>
>> Initially, the distributor wasn't willing to give us a preview, and
>> finally agreed to a refund within 30 days if the program didn't work for
>> the instructor. It didn't, so we returned it.
>>
>> Cynthia Steinhoff
>> Anne Arundel Community College
>> Arnold, MD
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
>> [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu]On Behalf Of Jerry Notaro
>> Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 3:16 PM
>> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
>> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Restricted PPR
>>
>>
>> 2 Two tiered pricing where a title IS available in the home market but
>> you are ?encouraged? to buy the higher priced model for PPR rights you
>> probably don?t need ( FYI as streaming becomes more desired this may
>> change) . Here you basically have to use common sense and make sure you
>> know your options
>>
>> The situation is worse than two tier and getting out of hand. California
>> Newsreel has a 3 tier pricing structure, differentiating further
>> College, Corporation, Gov't Agencies from High Schools, Public
>> Libraries, HBCUs
>> & Qualifying Community Organizations. The first tier is four times the
>> price of the second. I don?t know where anyone gets the idea we are
>> better off, but we took a 15% hit off the top this year and are facing
>> an additional 10% next year.
>>
>> Jerry
>>
>> ________________________________
>> The information contained in this email may be confidential and/or
>> legally privileged. It has been sent for the sole use of the intended
>> recipient(s). If the reader of this message is not an intended
>> recipient, you are hereby notified that any unauthorized review, use,
>> disclosure, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this
>> communication, or any of its content, is strictly prohibited. If you
>> have received this communication in error, please contact the sender by
>> reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. Thank you.
>>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment scrubbed and removed.
>> HTML attachments are only available in MIME digests.
>>
>> ------------------------------
>>
>> Message: 4
>> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 17:21:10 -0500
>> From: "Elizabeth Stanley" <Elizabeth@bullfrogfilms.com>
>> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Film on Pay Equity Issues
>> To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
>> Message-ID: <C1CCDAA82247BD49A74E8595832E6784018BCCA9@companyweb>
>> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"
>>
>> Hello, Sue,
>>
>> "The Motherhood Manifesto" (DVD, 2007, 58 minutes) looks at the
>> obstacles facing working mothers and families, and the employer and
>> public policy changes needed to restore work-life balance.
>>
>> http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/mother.html
>>
>> Moving personal stories combined with humorous animation, expert
>> commentary and hilarious old film clips tell the tale of what happens to
>> working mothers and their families in America. See how enlightened
>> employers and public policy can make paid family leave, flexible working
>> hours, part-time parity, universal healthcare, excellent childcare,
>> after-school programs and realistic living wages a reality for American
>> families. The film is based on the book The Motherhood Manifesto by
>> Joan Blades and Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner.
>>
>> "Illustrates the point that, compared with other industrial nations, the
>> United States is shockingly remiss in providing working conditions
>> conducive to balancing home and work life...Recommended for public,
>> school, and academic collections." Mary Laskowski, University of
>> Illinois Library, Library Journal
>>
>> "Effectively points out the curious hypocrisy of American politicians
>> who brag about 'family values' -- holding up stay-at-home motherhood as
>> best for children -- yet refuse to put pressure on businesses to offer
>> paid leave or allow federal tax breaks for the working spouse.
>> Recommended." Video Librarian
>>
>> This title may already be in your media collection. Let me know if you
>> need additional copies for Equal Pay Day next year.
>>
>> Best,
>> Elizabeth Stanley
>> Bullfrog Films
>> www.bullfrogfilms.com
>> 800-543-3764
>>
>>
>> ________________________________
>>
>> From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
>> [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Parks, Sue
>> Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 12:36 PM
>> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
>> Subject: [Videolib] Film on Pay Equity Issues
>>
>>
>>
>> All,
>>
>>
>>
>> Our Women's Center and Women's Studies Program are teaming up to
>> increase awareness of gender pay equity issues by hosting some events
>> for Equal Pay Day next year. They'd like to host a screening of a film
>> that deals with pay equity issues. Any suggestions?
>>
>>
>>
>> Thank you!
>>
>>
>>
>> Sue
>>
>>
>>
>> Sue Parks
>>
>> Head, Media Library
>>
>> University of North Texas
>>
>> 1155 Union Circle #305190
>>
>> Denton, TX 76203-5017
>>
>> (940) 369-7249
>>
>> (940) 369-7396 (fax)
>>
>> sue.parks@unt.edu
>>
>>
>>
>> -------------- next part --------------
>> An HTML attachment scrubbed and removed.
>> HTML attachments are only available in MIME digests.
>>
>> End of videolib Digest, Vol 12, Issue 28
>> ****************************************
>>
>> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
>> issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
>> control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
>> libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
>> as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel
>> of
>> communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
>> producers and distributors.
>>
>
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
> issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
> control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
> libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
> as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of
> communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
> producers and distributors.
>

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley

510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"I have always preferred the reflection of life to life itself."
--Francois Truffaut

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of
communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
producers and distributors.

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley

510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"I have always preferred the reflection of life to life itself."
--Francois Truffaut

------------------------------

Message: 2
Date: Thu, 13 Nov 2008 11:41:04 -0500
From: "Mark Kopp" <mkopp@iu08.org>
Subject: Re: [Videolib] ...another peeve [Scanned]
To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu>
Message-ID:
<755EEC6644EDE248A3A31F376E6DDCBF015B568A@EXCHANGE.appalachia.iu8>
Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii"

Would a car salesman tell you a $3000 rebate is coming out on the car
you intended to buy today, if you wait till next month to buy your car?

Mark W. Kopp
Technology Assistant
IT Department
Appalachia Intermediate Unit 8
4500 6th Avenue
Altoona, PA 16602
P: 814-940-0223
F: 814-949-0984
C: 814-937-2802

-----Original Message-----
From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
[mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
Sent: Thursday, November 13, 2008 11:05 AM
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Subject: [Videolib] ...another peeve [Scanned]

Oh yeah...I was just thinking this morning about another peeve related
to
the subject of tiered pricing and home video vs PPR pricing:

I go absolutely wild when I buy an indie doc title for big bucks, only
to
to find that it is released into the home video market a few months
later.
Again, I don't need PPR--we only circulate stuff for in-house viewing
by
individuals or classroom screening. I will consequently ALWAYS go for
the
home version. Seems to me that distributors should be stand-up folks
and
disclose the fact that particular titles in their catalogs are, or will
shortly be, available as home video... My policy is generally to return
materials that I discover to be available as such...which is a pain for
both me and the seller.

gary

---------------------------- Original Message
----------------------------
Subject: Re: [Videolib] videolib Digest, Vol 12, Issue 28
From: ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
Date: Wed, November 12, 2008 6:50 pm
To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
Reply To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
------------------------------------------------------------------------

--

Oy...! OK: let's stop and breath deeply here.

I'm reminded of ol' Ben Franklin's aphorism about hanging together lest we hanging separately. The fact is, I think, as far as independently produced and distributed documentary works, both the makers/distributors and the end-users have a kind of symbiotic relationship that bears little relation to the print publishing/library world. I'm not nuts about paying high prices either, but neither am I thrilled about the prospects of an information universe populated by home video alone.

Tiered pricing has been a fact of life as long as I've been in the business (only 30 years, Jerry...I'm wowed by your 37!) Am I wild about this practice, less and less so as my dollars continue to shrink. I'm willing to shell out mainly because I generally believe in the product and I believe that no one is getting rich in this business. If folks like Newsreel and Bullfrog and Icarus and Filmakers Library and New Day were forced to charge home video prices across the board, how long would they be around? Not very, I'd wager.

What I will not tolerate, however, is "tiered pricing" based on false notions or false sales pitches. I'd like a buck for every distributor I've come across over the years that foists higher prices on institutions under the ol' "public performance rights" ploy...or, worse, the contention that you need separate rights to use the material in a classroom. If a distributor wants to charge higher prices to institutions based on market factors, well, OK. Just do try to BS me about the reasons behind this practice...

Gary Handman

> After 37 years in the business I think I have a very realistic view of > media education distribution. In fact I just ordered "Zora Neale > Hurston: Jump at the Sun" today at a request of a faculty member. > > I'm just glad that book seller's don't follow California Newsreel's > pricing structure. More people read library copies so let's price them > higher. Just because you derive the majority of your income from colleges > and universities does not mean your tier system is justified. What type of > logic is that? I don't know if you've read the newspapers about publicly > funded organizations lately, but they've gone through a bit of a rough > time and we have had to serve many more with much less. And I find your > remarks like "overweening sense of entitlement" to be insulting. No one is > saying producers and distributors shouldn't be compensated. What is being > criticized is the methodology. I think it is the distributors who use the > multitiered system that are going to be facing the "stark realities" of > the present economy. > > Jerry > >> Jerry Notaro's indignation at California Newsreel's two-tier pricing >> policy is a striking illustration of how an overweening sense of >> entitlement blinds some video-lib contributors to the stark realities of >> educational distribution. The University of South Florida touts itself >> as among the top 63 (not 62) public research universities in the nation. >> If its resources are really the same as an AME church in Mississipppi's >> Black Belt, an inner city junior high school or a public library in >> rural Kansas, one can only wonder at the quality of education its >> students receive. California Newsreel is a non-profit, tax-exempt >> corporation; we cannot justify denying poor and community-based >> organizations access to our films just so the University of South >> Florida can get a bargain. But that's exactly what we'd have to do if we >> followed Jerry Notaro's wishes. The unalterable fact is California >> Newsreel like many other educational distributors derives at least 85% >> of its sales revenue from the higher priced university and college >> market. If we were forced to choose just one price point, it is obvious >> which it would have to be. This would, of course, only succeed in >> contributing to the increasing inequality in this country some of us >> hope the recent election will reverse. So if Newsreel elects to use its >> grant income to subsidize the community market, we must, I'm afraid, >> plead guilty. By the way, we have maintained two-tier pricing for close >> to twenty years and most video librarians have understood its benefits. >> If Jerry Notaro can provide USF staff and students films comparable to >> "Unnatural Causes," "Race - the Power of an Illusion," "Zora Neale >> Hurston: Jump at the Sun" or "Blue Eyed" from Blockbuster or Amazon.com, >> so be it. I hope the rest of us on this list-serve will move forward on >> the assumption that no one - producers, distributors or video librarians >> - is getting rich ripping the other off. Educational distribution is a >> fragile ecosystem; it should not be wantonly trashed. >> >> >> -----Original Message----- >> From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu >> [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of >> videolib-request@lists.berkeley.edu >> Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 2:28 PM >> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu >> Subject: videolib Digest, Vol 12, Issue 28 >> >> Send videolib mailing list submissions to >> videolib@lists.berkeley.edu >> >> To subscribe or unsubscribe via the World Wide Web, visit >> >> https://calmail.berkeley.edu/manage/list/listinfo/videolib@lists.berkele >> y.edu >> >> or, via email, send a message with subject or body 'help' to >> videolib-request@lists.berkeley.edu >> >> You can reach the person managing the list at >> videolib-owner@lists.berkeley.edu >> >> When replying, please edit your Subject line so it is more specific than >> "Re: Contents of videolib digest..." >> >> >> Today's Topics: >> >> 1. Re: Restricted PPR (Jerry Notaro) >> 2. Re: Film on Pay Equity Issues (deg farrelly) >> 3. Re: Restricted PPR (Steinhoff, Cindy) >> 4. Re: Film on Pay Equity Issues (Elizabeth Stanley) >> >> >> ---------------------------------------------------------------------- >> >> Message: 1 >> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 15:16:14 -0500 >> From: Jerry Notaro <notaro@stpt.usf.edu> >> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Restricted PPR >> To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu> >> Message-ID: <C540A3BE.206FE%notaro@stpt.usf.edu> >> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="iso-8859-1" >> >> >> 2 Two tiered pricing where a title IS available in the home market but >> you are ?encouraged? to buy the higher priced model for PPR rights you >> probably don?t need ( FYI as streaming becomes more desired this may >> change) . Here you basically have to use common sense and make sure you >> know your options >> >> The situation is worse than two tier and getting out of hand. California >> Newsreel has a 3 tier pricing structure, differentiating further >> College, Corporation, Gov't Agencies from High Schools, Public >> Libraries, HBCUs & Qualifying Community Organizations. The first tier is >> four times the price of the second. I don?t know where anyone gets the >> idea we are better off, but we took a 15% hit off the top this year and >> are facing an additional 10% next year. >> >> Jerry >> -------------- next part -------------- >> An HTML attachment scrubbed and removed. >> HTML attachments are only available in MIME digests. >> >> ------------------------------ >> >> Message: 2 >> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 14:38:43 -0700 >> From: deg farrelly <deg.farrelly@asu.edu> >> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Film on Pay Equity Issues >> To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu> >> Cc: Sue.Parks@unt.edu >> Message-ID: <C5409AF3.3C5D4%deg.farrelly@asu.edu> >> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="US-ASCII" >> >> The first work that comes to my mind is "The Willmar 8" >> >> Still distributed by California Newsreel: >> http://www.newsreel.org/nav/title.asp?tc=CN0108&s=willmar%208 >> >> The Willmar 8 is Academy Award winner Lee Grant's documentary >> about working women which has been featured on the front page of The >> Wall Street Journal, excerpted on 60 Minutes, and was broadcast >> nationally by PBS. The film tells the story of eight unassuming, >> apolitical women in America's heartland--Willmar, Minnesota--who were >> driven by sex discrimination at work to take the most unexpected step of >> their lives and found themselves in the forefront of the struggle for >> women's rights. Risking jobs, friends, family and the opposition of >> church and community, they began the longest bank strike in American >> history in a dramatic attempt to assert their own equality and >> self-worth. >> >> >> >> FMG has a very short (8 minutes) segment from ABC News: >> >> The Pay Gap: Sexism or Something Else? >> >> Warren Farrell protested alongside Gloria Steinem in support of women's >> rights and was even elected to the board of NOW-three times. But Farrell >> is also the author of Why Men Earn More: The Startling Truth Behind the >> Pay Gap-and What Women Can Do About It. In this brief ABC News segment, >> John Stossel considers the opposing views of Farrell and Martha Burk, >> chair of the NCWO and author of Cult of Power: Sex Discrimination in >> Corporate America and What Can Be Done About It. It's about supply and >> demand, states Farrell, not sexism: higher compensation generally means >> bigger sacrifices on the home front-a cost most women are statistically >> less willing to bear than men. (8 minutes) >> >> >> If you want something on a lighter note... >> >> 9 to 5 >> >> >> >> -- >> deg farrelly, Associate Librarian >> Arizona State University at the West campus PO Box 37100 Phoenix, >> Arizona 85069-7100 >> Phone: 602.543.8522 >> Email: deg.farrelly@asu.edu >> >> >>> Our Women's Center and Women's Studies Program are teaming up to >> increase >>> awareness of gender pay equity issues by hosting some events for Equal >> Pay Day >>> next year. They'd like to host a screening of a film that deals with >> pay >>> equity issues. Any suggestions? >>> >>> Thank you! >>> >>> Sue >>> >>> Sue Parks >>> Head, Media Library >>> University of North Texas >> >> >> >> >> ------------------------------ >> >> Message: 3 >> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 17:03:50 -0500 >> From: "Steinhoff, Cindy" <cksteinhoff@aacc.edu> >> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Restricted PPR >> To: "'videolib@lists.berkeley.edu'" <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu> >> Message-ID: >> >> <3614638D4C701B438F335F0EFA8F6EBC6115B0C115@AACC-MAILBOX.aacc.cc.md.us> >> >> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="windows-1252" >> >> I, too, have been seeing more multi-tier pricing, with 3 or 4 tiers. I >> just bought a DVD from a small distributor and it had 4 pricing tiers. >> Home use was the lowest price, followed by K-12 schools Community >> organizations and public libraries were next, and college and >> universities at the highest price - $250, almost 3 times what community >> organizations and public libraries would pay. When I asked about the >> rationale, I was told that "more people would view it in a college," and >> they were trying to price according use. We're not a huge school, and >> this was a program that would be used by one instructor with probably no >> more than 40-50 students a semester. I would guess, given the topic of >> the program, that more viewers than that would see it in a high school >> or community organization setting. >> >> Initially, the distributor wasn't willing to give us a preview, and >> finally agreed to a refund within 30 days if the program didn't work for >> the instructor. It didn't, so we returned it. >> >> Cynthia Steinhoff >> Anne Arundel Community College >> Arnold, MD >> -----Original Message----- >> From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu >> [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu]On Behalf Of Jerry Notaro >> Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 3:16 PM >> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu >> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Restricted PPR >> >> >> 2 Two tiered pricing where a title IS available in the home market but >> you are ?encouraged? to buy the higher priced model for PPR rights you >> probably don?t need ( FYI as streaming becomes more desired this may >> change) . Here you basically have to use common sense and make sure you >> know your options >> >> The situation is worse than two tier and getting out of hand. California >> Newsreel has a 3 tier pricing structure, differentiating further >> College, Corporation, Gov't Agencies from High Schools, Public >> Libraries, HBCUs >> & Qualifying Community Organizations. The first tier is four times the >> price of the second. I don?t know where anyone gets the idea we are >> better off, but we took a 15% hit off the top this year and are facing >> an additional 10% next year. >> >> Jerry >> >> ________________________________ >> The information contained in this email may be confidential and/or >> legally privileged. It has been sent for the sole use of the intended >> recipient(s). If the reader of this message is not an intended >> recipient, you are hereby notified that any unauthorized review, use, >> disclosure, dissemination, distribution, or copying of this >> communication, or any of its content, is strictly prohibited. If you >> have received this communication in error, please contact the sender by >> reply email and destroy all copies of the original message. Thank you. >> >> -------------- next part -------------- >> An HTML attachment scrubbed and removed. >> HTML attachments are only available in MIME digests. >> >> ------------------------------ >> >> Message: 4 >> Date: Wed, 12 Nov 2008 17:21:10 -0500 >> From: "Elizabeth Stanley" <Elizabeth@bullfrogfilms.com> >> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Film on Pay Equity Issues >> To: <videolib@lists.berkeley.edu> >> Message-ID: <C1CCDAA82247BD49A74E8595832E6784018BCCA9@companyweb> >> Content-Type: text/plain; charset="us-ascii" >> >> Hello, Sue, >> >> "The Motherhood Manifesto" (DVD, 2007, 58 minutes) looks at the >> obstacles facing working mothers and families, and the employer and >> public policy changes needed to restore work-life balance. >> >> http://www.bullfrogfilms.com/catalog/mother.html >> >> Moving personal stories combined with humorous animation, expert >> commentary and hilarious old film clips tell the tale of what happens to >> working mothers and their families in America. See how enlightened >> employers and public policy can make paid family leave, flexible working >> hours, part-time parity, universal healthcare, excellent childcare, >> after-school programs and realistic living wages a reality for American >> families. The film is based on the book The Motherhood Manifesto by >> Joan Blades and Kristin Rowe-Finkbeiner. >> >> "Illustrates the point that, compared with other industrial nations, the >> United States is shockingly remiss in providing working conditions >> conducive to balancing home and work life...Recommended for public, >> school, and academic collections." Mary Laskowski, University of >> Illinois Library, Library Journal >> >> "Effectively points out the curious hypocrisy of American politicians >> who brag about 'family values' -- holding up stay-at-home motherhood as >> best for children -- yet refuse to put pressure on businesses to offer >> paid leave or allow federal tax breaks for the working spouse. >> Recommended." Video Librarian >> >> This title may already be in your media collection. Let me know if you >> need additional copies for Equal Pay Day next year. >> >> Best, >> Elizabeth Stanley >> Bullfrog Films >> www.bullfrogfilms.com >> 800-543-3764 >> >> >> ________________________________ >> >> From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu >> [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Parks, Sue >> Sent: Wednesday, November 12, 2008 12:36 PM >> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu >> Subject: [Videolib] Film on Pay Equity Issues >> >> >> >> All, >> >> >> >> Our Women's Center and Women's Studies Program are teaming up to >> increase awareness of gender pay equity issues by hosting some events >> for Equal Pay Day next year. They'd like to host a screening of a film >> that deals with pay equity issues. Any suggestions? >> >> >> >> Thank you! >> >> >> >> Sue >> >> >> >> Sue Parks >> >> Head, Media Library >> >> University of North Texas >> >> 1155 Union Circle #305190 >> >> Denton, TX 76203-5017 >> >> (940) 369-7249 >> >> (940) 369-7396 (fax) >> >> sue.parks@unt.edu >> >> >> >> -------------- next part -------------- >> An HTML attachment scrubbed and removed. >> HTML attachments are only available in MIME digests. >> >> End of videolib Digest, Vol 12, Issue 28 >> **************************************** >> >> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of >> issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic >> control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in >> libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve >> as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel >> of >> communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video >> producers and distributors. >> > > > VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of > issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic > control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in > libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve > as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of > communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video > producers and distributors. >

Gary Handman Director Media Resources Center Moffitt Library UC Berkeley

510-643-8566 ghandman@library.berkeley.edu http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"I have always preferred the reflection of life to life itself." --Francois Truffaut

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

Gary Handman Director Media Resources Center Moffitt Library UC Berkeley

510-643-8566 ghandman@library.berkeley.edu http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"I have always preferred the reflection of life to life itself." --Francois Truffaut

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

End of videolib Digest, Vol 12, Issue 31 ****************************************

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.