Re: [Videolib] Long live DVD... for five more years

Delin, Peter (delin@zlb.de)
Fri, 07 Nov 2008 16:09:14 +0100

... for five more years? I don't think so. Blu ray is great for 4K
restorations to be seen on a big screen (30" up). Blu ray (1920 x 1080)
comes near to 2K digital cinema projection (2048 x 1536) and works very
well in home theaters with video projectors and screens of 80" and more.

But how many HD masters exist to be published on Blu ray. Otherwise
there will be not much difference to SD-DVD. Production of Blu ray is
expensive. How many publishers can afford Blu ray publishing in a market
with such a small household penetration of Blu ray players? As a Blu
ray publisher you need a high volume of sales. That's difficult with not
so much popular titles. So Blu ray might work well for the major
companies but perhaps only for them.

DVD will be the work horse for film publishing for a long time. Remember
that many countries in the world are just adopting the DVD format, e.g.
in Turkey where most videos were published on CD video up to rencently.
We are replacing our Turkish CD videos by DVDs just now, but many rare
titles are not yet available on DVD.

By the way I was told that Blu ray Disc are not appropriate to library
use because they can't be repaired. Scratch remove is difficult because
the layer is at the bottom.

kind regards
Peter

Zentral- und Landesbibliothek Berlin
Videolektorat
Bluecherplatz 1
10961 Berlin
Germany

Tel.: +4930/90226-198
Fax.: +4930/90226-163
Email: delin@zlb.de
http://www.zlb.de/wissensgebiete/kunst_buehne_medien/videos
http://buecherei.netbib.de/coma/FilmSearch
http://buecherei.netbib.de/coma/Filmliteratur
http://dvdbiblog.wordpress.com/ (privat)

John Fossett schrieb:
> Did anyone see this? Thoughts?
>
> John
>
>
>
> http://videoeta.com/news.html?id=2609&rss=1
> <http://videoeta.com/news.html?id=2609&rss=1>
>
> BLU-RAY DISC NEWS
>
> *Long live DVD... for five more years*
>
> http://videoeta.com/images/news/dvd_tombstone.jpg
>
> /Posted October 23, 2008 at 12:09 PM /
>
> By John Couture <http://videoeta.com/about/staff/john.html>
>
> I was sitting in a meeting the other day, and someone mentioned that
> Adams Media Research <http://www.adamsmediaresearch.com/>, a well
> respected research firm in the home entertainment world, predicts that
> DVD will die a swift death sometime in 2013. That's five years from now.
>
> I could drone on and on about Blu-ray market penetration trends and DVD
> adoption models and how they translate to the current situation, but the
> point of all that would be simply that DVD is already considered to be a
> mature product line and Blu-ray will inevitably replace the DVD much
> like DVD replaced VHS, CDs replaced cassette tapes and so on.
>
> This wasn't the first time that I've heard these estimates or the idea
> that Blu-ray will ultimately replace DVD, but it's the first that it
> sunk in that DVDs might be as hard to find in 2013 as VHS is to find
> today. And now that it's sunk in, I think the data crunchers might be a
> wee bit ahead of themselves on this one.
>
> The more I started to think on this, the more reasons I came up with as
> to why I think DVD will survive its impending death. If it interests
> you, I've included my thoughts below.
>
> 1. *This 2013 projection relies too heavily on the VHS model*
> It is only natural for researchers to use the DVD vs. VHS data
> when projecting the Blu-ray vs. DVD scenario, but it's not all
> comparing apples to apples. When it came to DVD vs. VHS, DVD was
> the vastly superior format in many ways. DVD was more durable than
> VHS, easier to store, allowed for special features and more
> content in the same box and the quality difference between DVD and
> VHS was so vast that anyone who saw a DVD could easily admit that
> it was better than VHS.
>
> When comparing Blu-ray to DVD, the main differences are increased visual
> and audio quality and more space on the disc to allow for more features
> to be included in the box. Unfortunately, the quality differences
> between Blu-ray and DVD are minor when compared to the quality
> differences between DVD and VHS. Also, according to Adams, while the
> number of HD homes in America will rise to 84% in 2012, only about 55%
> of US households will be using HDTV.
>
> In other words, only half of America will be taking advantage of the
> increased quality of high def TV over standard def TV. If that's the
> case, why would you expect a higher percentage to choose the higher def
> disc over the "standard def" disc?
>
> 2. *Blu-ray players are backwards compatible*
> Unless you have one of those DVD/VHS combo players, you can't play
> your VHS tapes on the same machine that you play your DVD movies.
> Blu-ray players, however, play DVD movies just fine.
>
> As someone with a vast DVD library, this was a big factor in my decision
> to enter the Blu-ray realm. As a bonus, most (if not all) Blu-ray
> players automatically upconvert DVDs to near HD quality.
>
> As a result, this means that I am less likely to replace my DVD copy
> with a Blu-ray version of the said movie automatically. Of course, I did
> have to get The Fifth Element <http://videoeta.com/movie/266> on
> Blu-ray, despite having it on every format imaginable already.
>
> 3. *Not all movies deserve Blu-ray treatment*
> Recently, Warner Bros. announced that Dumb and Dumber
> <http://videoeta.com/movie/302> was coming out on Blu-ray. No,
> really, it is. Far be it for me to debate the merits of a Jim
> Carrey <http://videoeta.com/person/13> movie being fit for
> Blu-ray, but suffice it to say, there's really not much of a
> difference between seeing it on DVD vs. Blu-ray. It's not going to
> make the fart jokes funnier.
>
>
>
> 4. *The cost and technology are a barrier to entry for some.*
> Granted, we are getting to a point where people are finally
> getting technologically savvy enough to be dangerous, but Blu-ray
> is another beast altogether.
>
> Currently, the high cost of entry is prohibiting mass adoption of
> Blu-ray, but there are rumblings
> <http://www.tvsnob.com/archives/022212.php> that Blu-ray players might
> cross under that magical price point of $200 as early as next month. Of
> course, these entry level machines are not created equal as they are
> (for the most part) on DVD.
>
> Two of the more compelling arguments in favor of Blu-ray are also two of
> the most technologically advanced features. They both require internet
> connectivity, if not constant connection. The first is the ability to
> update Blu-ray firmware automatically through the Internet connection.
> The second is the exciting BD-Live feature that allows viewer to
> download more content after buying the Blu-ray disc, as well as interact
> with other owners of the movie.
>
> Both of these features are sometimes lacking from entry-level players
> and even when they are available, the process of connecting to the
> Internet from a stand-alone player isn't all too intuitive.
>
> The Sony PS3 is really the key here as its dual function as a game
> system allows for constant Internet connection and ease of updates.
> Although currently, the PS3 trails the XBOX 360 in market penetration
> and the PS3 has yet to hit that magical $200 price point.
>
> At the end of the end, five years from now, only then will we truly be
> at a place where we can say with any sort of certainty what the 2013
> will bring. But, as someone who has already replaced most, if not all,
> of my VHS with DVDs, I'm not looking forward to going through the
> process again so quickly.
>
>
>
>
>
>
>
> John F. Fossett
>
> Media Librarian
>
> Kitsap Regional Library
>
> Sylvan Way Branch
>
> 1301 Sylvan Way
>
> Bremerton, WA 98310
>
> (360)405-9101
>
> jfossett@krl.org
>
>
>
> */KRL Mission Statement/*
>
> /Kitsap Regional Library serves the community as a center for lifelong
> learning and a steward of access to stories, information, and knowledge./
>
>
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------------------------------------------
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.