Re: [Videolib] Sarah's post on digital streaming

ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
Thu, 30 Oct 2008 12:16:19 -0700 (PDT)

Well...I've been following this thread with totally atypical
restraint...until now.

I need to weigh in on a couple of points:

Jessica's comments re the convenience factor vs face-to-face uses of media
are...well, charmingly retro. The fact of the matter is that pedagogy (at
least in higher ed) is changing radically, as educational culture, student
demographics, and faculty demographics, too. The physical classroom is
only one of many places where learning and teaching occur--in other words,
teaching in many cases is moving toward a "learner-centric model" and away
from the model in which a pundit stands at the head of the class and
expounds. Tools such as learning management systems have facilitated
these generally beneficial shifts. BlackBoard and other LMSs, when used
creatively, offer considerably more than convenience--they offer new ways
of structuring teaching and learning.

The delivery of intellectual and pedagogical content 24/7 is no longer a
luxury...it's a fact of life and an expectation in the academy. I think
most of us on this list are willing to pull that off for video. (Although
I think it will continue to be an uphill battle to educate faculty in this
area) Doing the honorable and ethical thing on our part, however, will
mean that distributors (at least distributors of educational and indie doc
works) will need to meet us half way when it comes to developing
reasonable pricing structures and delivery models which meet the the
long-term needs of the institution and the changing nature of education.

gary

> I thought I was pretty clear. Carrie was saying that since it is legal to
> use a video "face to face' IN a class it SHOULD be legal ( but she admits
> it
> is not) to digitize and stream it to those students. My comparison was
> that
> it IS legal to watch a video in your home , it is not legal to stream to
> others to watch in THEIR homes even though it IS legal for them to see the
> film in their homes .
>
> Some are arguing that for the purchase of a retail video ( this is my area
> FYI not what we often call educational videos) of say $20 a school should
> be
> able to digitize and stream it to students in a class because it is EASIER
> for them than watching in a class or they maybe want to see it again or
> the
> prof does not want to USE class time. Sorry but this is NOT the same as
> "face to face" and I obviously have a strong view that not only is it
> illegal it also violates what I would like to think as a moral pact
> between
> rights holders and the academic world. If you want a student to be able to
> see a film anytime or anywhere they find convenient it is frankly going to
> cost an additional fee because otherwise we just can't stay in business
> trying to make a lot of great films available to the academic world. Now
> we
> can debate what a reasonable fee might be for this use, which I would
> assume
> is somewhere between " we paid $25 for that DVD and we should not have
> to
> pay another penny to stream it " and $5,000 a year license charge.
>
>
> On 10/30/08 2:29 PM, "Moshiri, Farhad" <moshiri@uiwtx.edu> wrote:
>
>>
>>
>> -----Original Message-----
>> From: videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu
>> [mailto:videolib-bounces@lists.berkeley.edu] On Behalf Of Jessica Rosner
>> Sent: Thursday, October 30, 2008 12:57 PM
>> To: videolib@lists.berkeley.edu
>> Subject: Re: [Videolib] Sarah's post on digital streaming
>>
>> Jessica wrote:
>>
>>
>> Now supposes I bought a DVD of film X and I am a computer genius who can
>> download and digitize the thing and sent straight to my friends who have
>> to log in. They are only watching it themselves, I did not post it on
>> the internet so what if I send it to 200 of them who can now watch it at
>> home, I made it from a legal copy and they are watching it for personal
>> use ? If the MPAA finds out do you think that gets me off the hook
>> because it is the exact analogy you have to extending "face to face" to
>> "on demand"
>>
>> Jessica,
>>
>> I just don't understand your logic here. We are talking about official
>> institutions such as universities (in most cases non-profit), for
>> educational purposes only, and for official courses within the
>> university programs. Of course digitizing a video for 100 of your
>> friends is not right. I don't think anyone disputes that.
>>
>> Farhad
>>
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>> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
>> issues
>> relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
>> control,
>> preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries
>> and
>> related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an
>> effective
>> working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication
>> between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and
>> distributors.
>>
>>
>
>
>
> Proud Resident of a BLUE STATE
>
> Jessica Rosner
> Kino International
> 333 W 39th St. 503
> NY NY 10018
> jrosner@kino.com
> 212-629-6880
>
>
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
> issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic
> control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in
> libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve
> as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of
> communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video
> producers and distributors.
>

Gary Handman
Director
Media Resources Center
Moffitt Library
UC Berkeley

510-643-8566
ghandman@library.berkeley.edu
http://www.lib.berkeley.edu/MRC

"I have always preferred the reflection of life to life itself."
--Francois Truffaut

VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.