Re: [Videolib] copyright AGAIN

Dennis Doros (milefilms@gmail.com)
Thu, 30 Oct 2008 10:08:32 -0400

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Dear Anna,The basis for traditional film distribution was that a license had
a finite point. Life of material was never thought of as more than a decade
or so. A 16mm print supposedly would only last a certain amount of time (you
have to go back in time to remember that these prints would be run
frequently and most projectors -- even the best maintained -- would wear
down and even eat up prints periodically), and VHS and DVDs (even more so)
were expected to last even fewer years. Especially since the 1970s, a lot of
film and video income is based on the concept of re-selling rights and
materials with each new generation of technology.

The fact that half the original digital material for Toy Story (worth
millions) was lost within a decade proves that digital isn't necessarily
forever, but distributors and audio-visual librarians are both facing a new
era where we might all go the way of the buggy whip manufacturers and appear
in a Julius Knipl-Real Estate Photographer cartoon (The League of Lost Men,
anyone?). Why does one need either if everything is online and can be shown
with a click of a button? And don't think that the professors are currently
too ignorant to find a film and use technology. The generation of kids who
started using a computer at the age of two are becoming the professors of
today.

And the real fear is not that digitally, a film could last forever, but
unlike DVD and VHS, that it can be spread virally -- without loss of quality
-- until the day comes that only one copy is sold for $29.95 and is used by
everybody. I do know professors (they actually tell me!) who have downloaded
illegal copies of KILLER OF SHEEP and shown them in class so it is happening
already. We sold 12,000 copies of this DVD which sounds like an awful lot,
but five years ago, it would have sold two to three times more.

So until the day happens when technology, copyright laws, users and
distributors can form an agreeable business plan, there is going to be a
angst and animosity on all sides.

I personally have a date picked out for retirement, November 25, 2019, if
anyone wants to come to the party.

Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video

On Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 9:12 AM, Anna Headley <aheadle1@swarthmore.edu>wrote:

> As I understand it:
> I can buy a DVD with PPR for the life of the product. Even if you stop
> selling that DVD, if I still have it and it still works, I still have those
> rights. What is the difference with a digital file?? It should be the same
> thing. You sell it to me, you send it to me, and I own it along with the
> rights until it's obsolete or broken. After a while, your ownership runs
> out and you can't sell it anymore. But that shouldn't affect the copy I
> already have. Please tell me what I'm missing.
> best,
> anna h.
>

-- 
Best,
Dennis Doros
Milestone Film & Video
PO Box 128
Harrington Park, NJ 07640
Phone: 201-767-3117
email: milefilms@gmail.com
www.milestonefilms.com
www.exilesfilm.com
www.killerofsheep.com

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Dear Anna,<div>The basis for traditional film distribution was that a license had a finite point. Life of material was never thought of as more than a decade or so. A 16mm print supposedly would only last a certain amount of time (you have to go back in time to remember that these prints would be run frequently and most projectors -- even the best maintained -- would wear down and even eat up prints periodically), and VHS and DVDs (even more so) were expected to last even fewer years. Especially since the 1970s, a lot of film and video income is based on the concept of re-selling rights and materials with each new generation of technology.&nbsp;</div> <div><br></div><div>The fact that half the original digital material for Toy Story (worth millions) was lost within a decade proves that digital isn&#39;t necessarily forever, but distributors and audio-visual librarians are both facing a new era where we might all go the way of the buggy whip manufacturers and appear in a Julius Knipl-Real Estate Photographer cartoon (The League of Lost Men, anyone?). Why does one need either if everything is online and can be shown with a click of a button? And don&#39;t think that the professors are currently too ignorant to find a film and use technology. The generation of kids who started using a computer at the age of two are becoming the professors of today.&nbsp;</div> <div><br></div><div>And the <span class="Apple-style-span" style="font-style: italic;">real</span> fear is not that digitally, a film could last forever, but unlike DVD and VHS, that it can be spread virally -- without loss of quality -- until the day comes that only one copy is sold for $29.95 and is used by everybody. I do know professors (they actually tell me!) who have downloaded illegal copies of KILLER OF SHEEP and shown them in class so it is happening already. We sold 12,000 copies of this DVD which sounds like an awful lot, but five years ago, it would have sold two to three times more.</div> <div><br></div><div>So until the day happens when technology, copyright laws, users and distributors can form an agreeable business plan, there is going to be a angst and animosity on all sides.<br></div><div><br></div><div> I personally have a date picked out for retirement, November 25, 2019, if anyone wants to come to the party.</div><div><br></div><div>Dennis Doros</div><div>Milestone Film &amp; Video</div><div><br></div><div><br><br><div class="gmail_quote"> On Thu, Oct 30, 2008 at 9:12 AM, Anna Headley <span dir="ltr">&lt;<a href="mailto:aheadle1@swarthmore.edu">aheadle1@swarthmore.edu</a>&gt;</span> wrote:<br><blockquote class="gmail_quote" style="margin:0 0 0 .8ex;border-left:1px #ccc solid;padding-left:1ex;">

<div bgcolor="#ffffff" text="#000000"> As I understand it:<br> I can buy a DVD with PPR for the life of the product.&nbsp; Even if you stop selling that DVD, if I still have it and it still works, I still have those rights.&nbsp; What is the difference with a digital file??&nbsp; It should be the same thing.&nbsp; You sell it to me, you send it to me, and I own it along with the rights until it&#39;s obsolete or broken.&nbsp; After a while, your ownership runs out and you can&#39;t sell it anymore.&nbsp; But that shouldn&#39;t affect the copy I already have.&nbsp; Please tell me what I&#39;m missing.<br> best,<br> anna h.<br></div></blockquote></div><br clear="all"><br>-- <br>Best,<br>Dennis Doros<br>Milestone Film &amp; Video<br>PO Box 128<br>Harrington Park, NJ 07640<br>Phone: 201-767-3117<br>email: <a href="mailto:milefilms@gmail.com">milefilms@gmail.com</a><br> <a href="http://www.milestonefilms.com">www.milestonefilms.com</a><br><a href="http://www.exilesfilm.com">www.exilesfilm.com</a><br><a href="http://www.killerofsheep.com">www.killerofsheep.com</a><br> </div>

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