Re: [Videolib] where to buy vhs-monitor combo?

Susan Weber (sweber@langara.bc.ca)
Mon, 26 Nov 2007 14:20:12 -0800

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Janice:
The technology is shifting away from VHS-only. Our media services Dept.
is replacing VHS only players with dual
DVD and VHS players in all classrooms. That will carry us over for the
life of the player. We'll see
what technology arises by the time the dual machines need to be replaced.
You asked if combo vhs -TV players are still sold and I can't answer
that, except that we will
be disposing of some. I wouldn't recommend buying
VHS-only anything at this point, but the dual players are a bridging
measure to cover both formats.
We bought 3 Panasonic VHS-DVD-TVs with 20-inch screens 3 years ago, and
I wouldn't buy them again
because they are so large, to accommodate the dual players. They are
very heavy, and require
2 people to lift. Better to buy the TV separately
from the DVD-VHS combo player - much lighter to carry.

For DVD-only units, we went with the ultra portable DVD-TV units that
have a 10-inch screen. They have 2 headphone
jacks and run on 12 volt or 110 or batteries. Obviously made for the
traveller, they have a large-
enough screen that we use them as preview units. I placed 1 of these
side by side with a 14-inch
DVD-TV combo unit and asked a teacher which unit she preferred.
Her answer was the small portable unit, because the brightness was
better, and the
picture appeared to be crisper.
The controls on the unit are the reason I would choose one model over
another. Some
controls are confusing, while others are very easy to use. Even within
the same brand name,
like Kodak, the models are very different. Since models change every
month, it seems, it
would be hard to recommend a specific one to you. Tomorrow, they could
be changed.

Viewing DVDs on a computer is not as easy to manoeuver through the
chapters or fast forward as
it is on a portable DVD player described above. I'm sure it depends on
the software that runs the
DVD, but I find the computer player much slower and cumbersome (no
remote). I've tried playing
DVDs on my notebook, and I find it is also slower and not as easy to
manipulate as a dedicated
player.
That has been my personal experience. Others may have more to say, and
I'm sure they will.

Susan

jwoo wrote:
> Hello everyone,
>
> I need to replace some old broken down equipment.
>
> Is it still possible to buy a vhs player with monitor combo (with
> headphone jack and less than 29 inches wide)?
> Or is everyone going the separate component route?
>
> Also, is it common to have users view dvds via computers rather than
> with a monitor and player?
>
> Thanks for your advice,
>
> Janice Woo, Director of Libraries
> California College of the Arts
> 5212 Broadway Oakland CA 94618
> 510.594.3660 || jwoo@cca.edu || library.cca.edu
>
>
> VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of
> issues relating to the selection, evaluation,
> acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current
> and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It
> is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for
> video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between
> libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

-- 
Susan Weber, Media Librarian
Langara College, Advanced Education Media
   Acquisitions Centre
100 West 49th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.  V5Y 2Z6
Tel. 604-323-5533     email: sweber@langara.bc.ca

Fast Forward Media Showcase http://www.langara.bc.ca/ffwd http://www.langara.bc.ca/aemac

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<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01 Transitional//EN"> Janice:
The technology is shifting away from VHS-only. Our media services Dept. is replacing VHS only players with dual
DVD and VHS players in all classrooms. That will carry us over for the life of the player. We'll see
what technology arises by the time the dual machines need to be replaced.
You asked if combo vhs -TV players are still sold and I can't answer that, except that we will
be disposing of some. I wouldn't recommend buying
VHS-only anything at this point, but the dual players are a bridging measure to cover both formats.
We bought 3 Panasonic VHS-DVD-TVs with 20-inch screens 3 years ago, and I wouldn't buy them again
because they are so large, to accommodate the dual players. They are very heavy, and require
2 people to lift.  Better to buy the TV separately
from the DVD-VHS combo player - much lighter to carry.

For DVD-only units, we went with the ultra portable DVD-TV units that have a 10-inch screen. They have 2 headphone
jacks and run on 12 volt or 110 or batteries. Obviously made for the traveller, they have a large-
enough screen that we use them as preview units. I placed 1 of these side by side with a 14-inch
DVD-TV combo unit and asked a teacher which unit she preferred.
Her answer was the small portable unit, because the brightness was better, and the
picture appeared to be crisper.
The controls on the unit are the reason I would choose one model over another. Some
controls are confusing, while others are very easy to use. Even within the same brand name,
like Kodak, the models are very different. Since models change every month, it seems, it
would be hard to recommend a specific one to you. Tomorrow, they could be changed.

Viewing DVDs on a computer is not as easy to manoeuver through the chapters or fast forward as
it is on a portable DVD player described above. I'm sure it depends on the software that runs the
DVD, but I find the computer player much slower and cumbersome (no remote). I've tried playing
DVDs on my notebook, and I find it is also slower and not as easy to manipulate as a dedicated
player.
That has been my personal experience. Others may have more to say, and I'm sure they will.

Susan


jwoo wrote:

Hello everyone,

I need to replace some old broken down equipment.

Is it still possible to buy a vhs player with monitor combo (with headphone jack and less than 29 inches wide)?
Or is everyone going the separate component route?

Also, is it common to have users view dvds via computers rather than with a monitor and player?

Thanks for your advice,

Janice Woo, Director of Libraries
California College of the Arts
5212 Broadway Oakland CA 94618
510.594.3660 || jwoo@cca.edu || library.cca.edu


VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.

-- 
Susan Weber, Media Librarian
Langara College, Advanced Education Media
   Acquisitions Centre
100 West 49th Avenue, Vancouver, B.C.  V5Y 2Z6
Tel. 604-323-5533     email: sweber@langara.bc.ca

Fast Forward Media Showcase
  http://www.langara.bc.ca/ffwd
  http://www.langara.bc.ca/aemac

--Boundary_(ID_51dwmfev0TkVIg+y31hdnw)-- VIDEOLIB is intended to encourage the broad and lively discussion of issues relating to the selection, evaluation, acquisition,bibliographic control, preservation, and use of current and evolving video formats in libraries and related institutions. It is hoped that the list will serve as an effective working tool for video librarians, as well as a channel of communication between libraries,educational institutions, and video producers and distributors.